A Holocene Prehistoric Sequence in the Egyptian Red Sea Area: The Tree Shelter

A Holocene Prehistoric Sequence in the Egyptian Red Sea Area: The Tree Shelter

Edited by Pierre M. VERMEERSCH
A.P. Kweakason
V. Linseele
E. Marinova
J. Moeyersons
V. Rots
B. Vanmontfort
W. Van Neer
Ph. Van Peer
P.M. Vermeersch
Volume: 7
Copyright Date: 2008
Published by: Leuven University Press
Pages: 104
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qf03t
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  • Book Info
    A Holocene Prehistoric Sequence in the Egyptian Red Sea Area: The Tree Shelter
    Book Description:

    The prehistory of the Eastern Desert of Egypt is not well understood. A Holocene Prehistoric Sequence in the Egyptian Red Sea Area: The Tree Shelter is an important contribution to our knowledge of the Epi-Palaeolithic, Neolithic and Predynastic occupation of the area. It presents the results of an excavation of a small rock shelter near Quseir, Egypt, which is one of the rare stratified sites in the Eastern Egyptian desert. The stratigraphic sequence starts around 8000 bp and continues until about 5000 bp. The archaeological material attests clear connections with the Nile Valley and the Western Desert during the wet Holocene period. Topics covered in the book include the site’s lithics and ceramics, microwear analysis of the lithic artefacts, and the woody vegetation of the Neolithic period.

    eISBN: 978-94-6166-033-6
    Subjects: Archaeology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-6)
  3. LIST OF FIGURES
    (pp. 7-8)
  4. Acknowledgements
    (pp. 9-9)
  5. Remarks in relation to the storage of the archaeological material
    (pp. 9-10)
  6. 1 FIELD WORK
    (pp. 11-62)
    P. M. Vermeersch, J. Moeyersons, P. Van Peer, V. Rots and B. Vanmontfort

    The site, a small shelter, is situated in a short wadi (fig. 1), which drains into the northern part of the large depression (figs. 2 & 3), east of the Gebel um Hammad and the Gebel Duwi, northwest of Quseir on the Red Sea coast in Egypt (26°16,332’ N; 33° 57,370’ E).

    During the 1995 field campaign, Dr. E. Paulissen and Dr. J. Moeyersons, who had joined a team working at the nearby Sodmein Cave (Vermeerschet al.1994), discovered, north of Sodmein Cave, a shelter in a small wadi tributary of the Sodmein Valley, characterised by a canyonlike deep...

  7. 2 MICROWEAR ANALYSIS OF SOME ARTEFACTS FROM ARCHAEOLOGICAL HORIZON 5
    (pp. 63-72)
    Amandus P. Kweakason

    The flint² which was used at the site is not very fine grained when compared with French fine grey flint, or British chalk flint. The flint has suffered slight structural transformation with the development of a microcrystalline form, with clearly shaped crystals floating in silica jelly matrices. Under a transmitted light microscope³, this flint is rich in a dark mineral solution, which may have caused the colouration, probably of iron impurities. It ranges from sub-crystalline to micro-crystalline with irregular but fused internal partitions. Although there is a slight variation between the flints from the lower horizon, as compared to the...

  8. 3 WOODY VEGETATION AND ITS USE DURING THE NEOLITHIC AT THE TREE SHELTER
    (pp. 73-78)
    Elena Marinova

    The site of Tree Shelter presents the rare opportunity of investigating Neolithic vegetation and its use by humans during their visits to the Red Sea Mountains, Egypt, an area still poorly studied from an archaeobotanical point of view. The main source of archaeobotanical information for this study is wood charcoal from the Neolithic layers of the site (Archaeological Horizons [AH] 1-4). Additional plant macrofossil material from several ovicaprine coprolites was analysed. In an earlier publication (Moeyersonset al.1999) identifications were pro vided from two wood charcoal samples from the two lowermost levels, AH4 and AH5. They were no longer available...

  9. 4 FAUNAL REMAINS FROM THE TREE SHELTER SITE
    (pp. 79-84)
    Veerle Linseele and Wim Van Neer

    Tree Shelter is a rock shelter in Wadi Sodmein, located in the Red Sea Mountains near El Qoseir. After a survey in 1995, small-scale excavations were carried out at the site in 1996. The site provided lumps ofin situarchaeologically rich deposits. Several habitation levels were recognised, but could not be individualised and have been attributed to five different archaeological horizons (AH). The upper horizon, AH1, has a subrecent hearth at its surface with a date of 200 BP ± 35 (GrN-22559). AH2 and AH3 are Neolithic, and comparable to the Middle and Late Neolithic from the Egyptian Western...

  10. 5 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION
    (pp. 85-98)
    P. M. Vermeersch

    Tree Shelter has been repeatedly occupied, probably always for a short–term period, from about 8.0 ka calBC on until about 3.7 calBC. The occupation horizons within this time period can not be individualised. For that reason five successive archaeological horizons have been defined (AH1-AH5). The attribution of an artefact to one of these horizons was based on the attribution to a field layer, on the study of the stratigraphic sedi ment genesis, and on the tri-dimensional position of the artefact. Each of the archaeological horizons represents a succession of probably short time visits to Tree Shelter. Such short-term visits...

  11. 6 REFERENCES
    (pp. 99-103)
  12. Back Matter
    (pp. 104-104)