The Sparking Discipline of Criminology

The Sparking Discipline of Criminology: John Braithwaite and the construction of critical social science and social justice

Stephan Parmentier
Lode Walgrave
Ivo Aertsen
Jeroen Maesschalck
Letizia Paoli
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: Leuven University Press
Pages: 165
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qf1n0
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    The Sparking Discipline of Criminology
    Book Description:

    Over the past decades, the Australian social scientist John Braithwaite (1951) has played a crucial role in the development of international criminology. He is universally considered one of the most renowned criminologists of our times and he has characteristically put his scientific engagement at the service of humanity and society by aiming at social justice, participative democracy, sustainable development and world peace. His relentless efforts to create links between the study of criminology and other scientific disciplines has led the K.U.Leuven (Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium) to honour Braithwaite in February 2008 with an honorary doctorate. In this collection of essays a number of well-known academics reflect on the work of John Braithwaite by addressing two leading questions: What are the implications of a republican theory of justice for criminology and criminal policy? And secondly, what is the role of academic criminology in today's social, political and economic environment? The volume is concluded by an extensive and insightful contribution from John Braithwaite himself, not only reflecting on the preceding essays in the book, but also addressing the challenges and future directions for academic criminology in the present day.

    eISBN: 978-94-6166-119-7
    Subjects: Law

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. INTRODUCTION: CRIMINOLOGY IN SEARCH OF NEW FRONTIERS
    (pp. 1-6)
    Ivo Aertsen, Jeroen Maesschalck, Letizia Paoli, Stephan Parmentier and Lode Walgrave

    On 4 February 2008 John Braithwaite received an honorary doctorate from the Catholic University of Leuven (K. U. Leuven, Belgium). By doing so, both the university and the Leuven Institute of Criminology (LINC) wished to express their deep appreciation for the crucial role that Braithwaite has played over the last decades in the development of international criminology and his relentless efforts to create links between criminology and other scientific disciplines. The ceremony was the more remarkable when taking into account that the general theme of the 2008 university-wide honorary doctorates was ‘sustainable development’ and that the two other foreign colleagues...

  4. LAUDATIO FOR JOHN BRAITHWAITE
    (pp. 7-10)
    Stephan Parmentier

    What do restorative justice, financial regulation and peacebuilding in post-conflict societies have in common? Most observers will be puzzled by this quiz-like question and will resort to sophisticated search engines on the World Wide Web to find an answer. For all us today, however, the answer is a very simple one, for the three topics mentioned have all been studied in extenso and with immense depth and great skill by our doctor honoris causa-to-be , Professor John Braithwaite.

    “The most cited author” in international criminological journals during the 1990s, “one of the most influential criminologists of our time”, and “the...

  5. BETWEEN EVANGELISM AND CHARLATANISM: REFLECTIONS ON THE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF CRIMINOLOGY AND OTHER SOCIAL SCIENCES
    (pp. 11-32)
    Lode Walgrave

    Some scientists behave like chickens. Chickens lay their egg without any concern about how it will be used. Whether it will be used for an omelette, be boiled hard, scrambled, laid out to hatch or simply thrown away, chickens do not care. Likewise, some scientists produce their ‘truth’, lay their ‘egg of knowledge’, and do not worry about how it will be used. Whether it is applied to produce more energy or a bomb, to cure people or to torture them more efficiently, to improve living conditions for all or to increase individual profits of the rich, to increase understanding...

  6. OUR SENSE OF JUSTICE: VALUES, JUSTICE AND PUNISHMENT
    (pp. 33-58)
    Susanne Karstedt

    As much as the criminological community has endorsed John Braithwaite’s theory of shaming, and the idea, concept and practice of restorative justice, as little attention criminologists have paid to the conceptual framework where he situated these ideas.A Republican Theory of Criminal Justice– the subtitle toNot Just Desertswhich was written in collaboration with political philoso - pher Philip Pettit (1990) - was published shortly after the path breakingCrime, Shame and Reintegration(1989), and in his collection of essays Braithwaite (2002: 12) reiterated and strengthened the link between restorative justice and a republican perspective. He named the following...

  7. WHY CRIMINOLOGY NEEDS OUTSIDERS
    (pp. 59-84)
    Tom Daems

    Most readers are probably familiar with the FAQ-sections (Frequently Asked Questions) of brochures or webpages of government organisations and private companies. The rationale is simple: the most common questions are grouped together in a simple format – standard questions are followed by standard answers. It is a smart way to avoid getting too many questions either by (proactively) anticipating difficulties that might arise when citizens or customers are in need of more information about a certain service or a specific product, or (reactively) by way of past experience with getting too many questions on a certain issue that, apparently, is in...

  8. BRAITHWAITE, CRIMINOLOGY AND THE DEBATE ON PUBLIC SOCIAL SCIENCE
    (pp. 85-114)
    Ian Loader and Richard Sparks

    We are involved in an extended project – or rather, though it still feels somehow immodest to put it in this way, a linked series of projects potentially extending over a number of years - aimed at re-thinking the character and scope of contemporary social science work on crime, justice and public policy.² Part of this work is concerned with contextual questions and with tracing historical connections amongst ideas and the policy outcomes that they have supported. This is pretty much what we had in mind in earlier work in advocating anhistorical-sociologicalapproach to crime policy (Loader and Sparks 2004)....

  9. WHY RESEARCH CANNOT BUT BE TRANS-DISCIPLINARY IN COMPLEX MATTERS OF ETHOS AND JUSTICE
    (pp. 115-130)
    Bart Pattyn

    In their preceding chapter, Ian Loader and Richard Sparks have started an interesting discussion. Sociologists and criminologists are considering whether they should be involved in the social debate and contribute to policy-supporting research. They are wondering whether, if they do so, they will still meet the strict requirements of scientific research, and conversely, if they don’t get involved, whether their research will still be relevant. The debate on the limitations of one’s own scientific expertise and the conditions of claiming the right to speak as an expert is, in itself, an interesting topic for sociological research. However, there is more...

  10. OPPORTUNITIES AND DANGERS OF CAPITALIST CRIMINOLOGY
    (pp. 131-150)
    John Braithwaite

    I have been lucky in my professional life as a criminologist to be surrounded by so many good friends and insightful scholars. Among them are the authors of the fine papers in this volume, whom I thank. I enjoy their company. They typify why I have been so nourished by the community of scholars that is criminology. That is the positive way in which I think of criminology – as a community of interesting people who come together with common research interests on the topic of crime. I do not think of it as a discipline with methods and theories that...

  11. SELECTED PUBLICATIONS BY JOHN BRAITHWAITE BY SUBJECT (1979-2010)
    (pp. 151-160)
  12. ABOUT THE AUTHORS
    (pp. 161-169)