No Cover Image

The Chrysanthemum and the Eagle: The Future of U.S.-Japan Relations

RYUZO SATO
Copyright Date: 1994
Published by: NYU Press
Pages: 240
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qfsnv
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    The Chrysanthemum and the Eagle
    Book Description:

    Whether in the form of the ongoing automotive wars, books and films such as Michael Crichton's Rising Sun, or George Bush's ill-fated trip to Japan in 1991, frictions between the United States and Japan have been steadily on the rise. Americans are bombarded with images of Japan's fundamental difference; at the same time, voices in Japan call for a Japan That Can Say No. If the guiding principle of the Clinton administration is indeed new values for a new generation, how will this be reflected in U.S.-Japanese relations?Convinced that no true solution to U.S.-Japanese frictions can be achieved without tracing these frictions back to their origin, Ryuzo Sato here draws on a binational experience that spans three decades in both the Japanese and American business and academic communities to do just that. In an attempt to bridge the communication gap between the two countries and dispel some of the mutual ignorance and misunderstanding that prevails between the two, Sato addresses the following questions: --Is Japan really different? --Has America's sun set?--How have conflicting views on the role of government affected U.S.-Japan relations?--What are the real differences in American and Japanese industrial policies?--What is the anatomy of U.S.-Japanese antagonisms?--What effect has the collapse of the bubble economy had on relations?--What is Japan's future course? Is it truly a technological superpower? Can it avoid international isolation? An incisive personal look at one of the most important political and economic global relationships, written by a major player in the world of international business and finance, THE CHRYSANTHEMUM AND THE EAGLE provides a readable and engaging tour of U.S.-Japan relations, past and present.

    eISBN: 978-0-8147-8870-7
    Subjects: Business

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-xviii)
  4. ONE THE RISE OF REVISIONISM
    (pp. 1-38)

    A New Containment Policy?Early in 1991, I had a discussion with James Fallows, the Washington editor of theAtlantic Monthly, who is calling for drastic changes in U.S. policy toward Japan. During the course of our conversation he made a remark that helps explain the mixed feelings Americans have toward Japan. When General Douglas MacArthur returned to the United States after heading the Allied occupation of Japan, Fallows said, the general was certain he had made Japan into an American clone, a notion that was apparently shared by most Americans in those days. In the course of subsequent Japan...

  5. TWO CONFLICTING VIEWS OF THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT
    (pp. 39-72)

    Japanese Hypercorporatism. One crucial difference between the United States and Japan is that Japan is a country that holds government in high esteem, whereas the American public has a fundamental distrust of government. This difference is significant because, as many have pointed out, postwar Japan has become an economic superpower under the “administrative guidance” of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), the government department whose function is to formulate and implement Japanese commercial and industrial policies. In order to rebuild a country that had been reduced to rubble during World War II, the Japanese government adopted policies that...

  6. THREE THE ANATOMY OF U.S.–JAPANESE ANTAGONISMS
    (pp. 73-102)

    America Is a Country of Rules. As I travel back and forth between Japan and the United States, I always feel that the first country is too homogeneous and the second is too pluralistic. In Japan, for example, it is easy to chat with the cab driver on the way to Narita Airport. From the opening conversational gambit about the weather to queries about my destination, the conversation flows smoothly and naturally with no hesitations or awkward silences. A dozen or so hours later when my plane lands in America and I disembark, I again take a taxi. My first...

  7. FOUR IN SOME WAYS JAPAN REALLY IS ODD
    (pp. 103-136)

    Are Money Games Really Bad?“America has become so engrossed in money games and M&As [mergers and acquisitions] that it no longer makes things. That is why its industrial base has eroded, and the country has gone on a consumer spending spree, buying things from all over the world. This is the basic reason for America’s twin deficits. Despite all the talk about service industries and the postindustrial society, it is inevitable that the economy of a country which has forgotten the importance of manufacturing will deteriorate.” These observations by Sony chairman Akio Morita are acute. The situation in the...

  8. FIVE IS A PAX JAPONICA POSSIBLE?
    (pp. 137-182)

    Conditions for Leadership. Paul Kennedy’sThe Rise and Fall of the Great Powerswas highly acclaimed in Japan because it contains two messages that are welcome to Japanese ears. The first is that the age of the great power (America) is coming to an end. The other is that the age of Japan is about to begin. But the Japanese have interpreted Kennedy’s work in a much too subjective fashion. Furthermore, references to Japan can only be found on a dozen or so pages of this very thick tome.

    Most Japanese readers bought this hefty history book to read those...

  9. SIX JAPAN’S FUTURE COURSE
    (pp. 183-208)

    Product Innovation versus Process Innovation. Has Japan really become such a technological superpower that it can, as Shintaro Ishihara claims, twist America and Russia around its little finger by controlling the flow of its high-tech exports? Or is Japan’s technological status still comparatively minor? Is the U.S. criticism that Japan is weak in the area of basic research still justified, and is the argument that, when it comes to technology, Japan has had a “free ride” correct? Both these views are probably right, but both are also probably wrong.

    Technological development should be thought of as a flow or a...

  10. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 209-210)
  11. INDEX
    (pp. 211-221)
  12. Back Matter
    (pp. 222-223)