Child poverty, evidence and policy

Child poverty, evidence and policy: Mainstreaming children in international development

Nicola Jones
Andy Sumner
Copyright Date: 2011
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qgpkz
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  • Book Info
    Child poverty, evidence and policy
    Book Description:

    This book is about the opportunities and challenges involved in mainstreaming knowledge about children in international development policy and practice. It focuses on the ideas, networks and institutions that shape the development of evidence about child poverty and wellbeing, and the use of such evidence in development policy debates. It also pays particular attention to the importance of power relations in influencing the extent to which children's voices are heard and acted upon by international development actors. The book weaves together theory, mixed method approaches and case studies spanning a number of policy sectors and diverse developing country contexts in Africa, Asia and Latin America. It therefore provides a useful introduction for students and development professionals who are new to debates on children, knowledge and development, whilst at the same time offering scholars in the field new methodological and empirical insights.

    eISBN: 978-1-84742-447-1
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. List of figures, tables and boxes
    (pp. v-vii)
  4. Acknowledgements
    (pp. viii-viii)
    Nicola Jones and Andy Sumner
  5. List of acronyms
    (pp. ix-xii)
  6. Introduction
    (pp. 1-4)

    This book is about child poverty, evidence and policy. It is about how children’svisibility, voice and visioninideas, networks and institutionscan be mainstreamed in development research and policy (see Figure I.1).

    Children (younger than 18 years old) account for, on average, over a third of the population in developing countries and almost half in the least-developed countries. Not only are a large proportion of these children poor, but the impacts of poverty suffered during childhood are often enduring and irreversible. We use the lens of ‘3D well-being’ to convey a holistic understanding of child poverty and well-being,...

  7. Part One: Child poverty, evidence and policy:: perspectives and approaches
    • ONE Child poverty and well-being
      (pp. 7-24)

      Children (if one takes theUnited Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child[UNCRC] definition of less than 18 years old) account for an average of 37% of the population in developing countries and 49% in the least-developed countries (UNICEF, 2005:12). Demographics are not the only reason, however, to advocate for a greater focus on child poverty and well-being in development research and policy: children are more likely to be poor, making up a disproportionate number of the total poor (Gordon et al, 2004; Barrientos and DeJong, 2009). The different ways in which adults and children experience poverty is...

    • TWO Knowledge generation and child poverty and well-being
      (pp. 25-52)

      In this chapter, we extend our 3D thinking on child poverty and well-being to consider knowledge and evidence generation. Given this book’s focus on the knowledge–policy interface around childhoods in the developing world, it is critical that we explore the knowledge base that underpins dominant understandings of childhood poverty and well-being. Questions that we need to consider include: how are multiple forms of ‘expertise’ accommodated? Whose ‘evidence’ prevails – that is, is perceived to be most credible – in policy debates and why? What accounts for the prevailing underinvestment in evidence about children, especially in developing countries? This chapter...

    • THREE Policy processes, knowledge and child well-being
      (pp. 53-86)

      In this chapter, we extend our 3D perspective on child poverty and well-being to consider policy processes, the role of knowledge in policy processes and policy advocacy with regard to children’s poverty and well-being.¹ There is a growing literature on children and policy processes. Many have defined a child-centred approach as one based on participatory decision-making with children (e.g. O’Malley, 2004). However, this is just one approach, and is no guarantee that children’s voices will be heard or heard equally. A child-sensitive approach can also be achieved by ensuring that children’s needs and rights are represented by children’s advocates –...

  8. Part Two: Child poverty, evidence and policy:: regional perspectives and case studies
    • FOUR Child poverty, knowledge and policy in Africa
      (pp. 89-124)

      This chapter is about children and the knowledge–policy interface in sub-Saharan Africa, and is structured as follows: Section 4.1 briefly outlines the extent and nature of child poverty and well-being across Africa using the 3D approach. Section 4.2 reflects on the characteristics of the knowledge-generation process in Africa. Section 4.3 discusses the knowledge–policy interface surrounding child well-being in Africa. Section 4.4 focuses on a case study of evidence-informed policy change in the context of an expert-led initiative to promote a more child-sensitive PRSP during the revision process of Ethiopia’s second-generation PRSP¹ and Section 4.5 concludes.

      In this section...

    • FIVE Child poverty, knowledge and policy in Asia
      (pp. 125-166)

      This chapter is about children and the knowledge–policy interface in Asia, and is structured as follows: Section 2 briefly outlines the extent and nature of child poverty and well-being across Asia using the 3D well-being approach and reflects on the characteristics of the knowledge-generation process in this region. Section 3 discusses opportunities and challenges involved in the knowledge–policy interface surrounding child well-being in Asia, paying particular attention to the significant decentralisation trend many countries in the region have undergone and the implications for evidence-informed policy-influencing initiatives. Section 4 focuses on a case study of evidence-informed policy change in...

    • SIX Child poverty, knowledge and policy in Latin America and the Caribbean
      (pp. 167-194)

      This chapter is about children and the knowledge–policy interface in Latin America, and is structured as follows: Section 1 briefly outlines the extent and nature of child poverty and well-being across Latin America using the 3D well-being approach, and Section 2 reflects on the characteristics of the knowledge-generation process in this region. Section 3 discusses opportunities and challenges involved in the knowledge–policy interface surrounding child well-being in Latin America, paying particular attention to the role of the media in shaping policy debates in the region and the rise of civil society in demanding greater accountability and transparency over...

  9. SEVEN Conclusions
    (pp. 195-202)

    Our book has focused on the relationships between child poverty/well-being, evidence/knowledge and policy change. We have employed a multilayered model as outlined in the Introduction (see Figure 7.1). These layers seek to understand child poverty and well-being in its material, relational and subjective domains; and the role of ideas, actors and political contexts in shaping related knowledge–policy interactions. Our approach is informed by a multidimensional understanding of power as material, discursive and institutional, and the ways in which power relations shape opportunities for children’s own voice (in decision-making), visibility (in knowledge-generation and policy processes) and vision (of well-being).

    By...

  10. References
    (pp. 203-236)
  11. APPENDIX: OECD’s Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI)
    (pp. 237-242)
  12. Index
    (pp. 243-251)
  13. Back Matter
    (pp. 252-252)