Children caring for parents with HIV and AIDS

Children caring for parents with HIV and AIDS: Global issues and policy responses

Ruth Evans
Saul Becker
Copyright Date: 2009
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qgvzh
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  • Book Info
    Children caring for parents with HIV and AIDS
    Book Description:

    This ground-breaking book focuses on the experiences and perspectives of children and young people who care for a parent with HIV in the global North and South. Drawing on in-depth qualitative research from the UK and Tanzania, the book presents a unique insight into the similarities and differences in children's and parents' experiences across diverse socio-economic, cultural and welfare contexts. The book makes a significant contribution to the growing research evidence on children and young people with caring responsibilities ('young carers') and the impacts of HIV and AIDS on families globally. It examines caring relationships within families affected by HIV and AIDS; the outcomes of caregiving; children's and families' resilience; the factors influencing whether children become involved in care work; and local and global policy responses. It also provides insight into the perspectives of parents living with HIV and service providers working with families. This book will be of interest to policy makers and practitioners in the field of HIV and AIDS, and to researchers, academics and students concerned with international development, social policy, human geography, childhood and youth studies, social work, health and social care, education, children's services and nursing and palliative care.

    eISBN: 978-1-84742-370-2
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-ix)
  3. List of figures, tables and boxes
    (pp. x-xv)
  4. Preface
    (pp. xvi-xviii)
  5. ONE Children’s and young people’s caring responsibilities within the family
    (pp. 1-38)

    Globally it is family members and communities that are usually relied upon – before state, charitable or other welfare agencies and sectors – to provide care, help, money and support to other family members who are ill, have physical impairments, mental health problems, chronic or life-limiting illnesses, or any other condition or need which requires personal intervention and assistance. The significance of the family as both an institution of welfare and for caregiving exists almost irrespective of the country’s familial, social and sociopolitical structures (Jani-Le Bris, 1993), although what isexpectedof family members and what they must do as...

  6. TWO HIV and the family
    (pp. 39-66)

    Since the first cases emerged in the early 1980s, HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) have been recognised not only as ahealthissue, but as a social issue that can have profound effects on people’s sense of self, emotional well-being, relationships with partners, family members and friends and their requirements for care and support. During the early years of the epidemic in the US, Western Europe and other high-income countries, HIV was associated with particular ‘risk groups’, notably gay men and intravenous drug users (Bor et al, 1993). Since the late 1990s, however, there has been...

  7. THREE Reflexivity, methodology and ethics: the research process
    (pp. 67-90)

    This book draws on qualitative research conducted for a comparative study¹ that aimed to explore the similarities and differences in the experiences, needs and resilience of children and young people who cared for parents/relatives with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania and the UK. The key objectives of the study were to, firstly, compare and contrast the structural and relational factors which influence whether and why children become carers in Tanzania and the UK; second, to develop an understanding of the experiences, needs and resilience of children caring for parents/relatives with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania and the UK; and third, to begin to identify...

  8. FOUR Living with HIV and the effects on family life: parents’ narratives
    (pp. 91-128)

    This chapter draws on a range of theoretical concepts to interpret the everyday lived experiences of women living with HIV. Based on indepth interviews with mothers and female relatives living with HIV in Tanzania and the UK, this chapter focuses on the effects of HIV on family life. We explore women’s changing health identities over time, from discovery of their status, their embodied everyday experiences of HIV and AIDS, to secrets and disclosure within the family. We discuss changes in family relationships and the wider socioeconomic factors that intersect with HIV/AIDS at the household and community levels, including poverty and...

  9. FIVE Children’s and young people’s care work in households affected by HIV and AIDS
    (pp. 129-150)

    This chapter discusses young people’s everyday caring responsibilities within households affected by HIV/AIDS in both the global North and South. As discussed in Chapter 1, research in the UK and other high-income countries as well as in Sub-Saharan Africa has demonstrated that young carers’ caring responsibilities do differ from other children’s household responsibilities in both the North and the South in terms of the extent and nature of children’s care work (Becker, 2007). The research in Tanzania and the UK further develops understandings of children’s care work gained from research with children caring for parents with a range of mental...

  10. SIX Resilience and impacts of care work for individual young people and their families
    (pp. 151-174)

    The growing body of research on young carers in the North has suggested that many children experience a range of negative outcomes for their education, health, emotional well-being, social lives and transition to adulthood as a result of their care work, as we discussed in Chapter 1 (Aldridge and Becker, 1993; Dearden and Becker, 1995; Becker et al,1998; Dearden and Becker, 1998; Frank et al, 1999; Thomas et al, 2003; Dearden and Becker, 2004). Research in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa has also identified a range of positive outcomes for children who care for a family member, such as increased...

  11. SEVEN Resilience and impacts of young people’s care work within the school and wider community
    (pp. 175-200)

    Previous research with young carers in the global North has suggested that young caregiving may have negative impacts on children’s educational performance and school attendance as well as restricting children’s opportunities for developing peer friendships and taking part in leisure and social activities in the wider community (Bilsborrow, 1992; Aldridge and Becker, 1993; Dearden and Becker, 1995; Marsden, 1995; Dearden and Becker, 1998; Crabtree and Warner, 1999; Thomas et al, 2003; Dearden and Becker, 2004). Following on from the previous chapter, this chapter discusses resilience and impacts of children’s care work in families affected by HIV/AIDS within the domains of...

  12. EIGHT The role of formal safety nets in building children’s and families’ resilience
    (pp. 201-226)

    This chapter focuses on the role of formal safety nets and external support from non-governmental community- and faith-based organisations and governmental/statutory providers in building the resilience of families affected by HIV/AIDS within the context of the North and South. In the previous chapters, we suggested that informal safety nets and supportive relationships within the family, neighbourhood, school and wider community play a crucial role in building children’s and families’ resilience and mitigating the negative impacts of young caregiving and HIV/AIDS on households. In severely affected communities in the South, however, these informal safety nets are being overstretched, and the capacity...

  13. NINE Global and local processes influencing young people’s caring roles in families affected by HIV and AIDS
    (pp. 227-268)

    Despite the growing body of research on young carers, only a few studies have theorised the factors influencing whether and why children become carers for family members with physical impairments, mental illness or chronic or life-limiting illnesses. However, since the 1990s, Becker’s research with his colleagues on young carers in the UK and other European countries has shown that the reasons why a particular child becomes a carer within any family will be complex and will vary from household to household and from situation to situation. Building on the analyses of previous studies on young carers in both the North...

  14. TEN Responding to the support needs of children and young people caring for parents with HIV
    (pp. 269-308)

    In our final chapter, we focus on the support needs of children and young people who care for parents with HIV and discuss local and global strategies and responses. The previous chapters have highlighted positive and negative outcomes of young caring for children, young people and parents and have analysed the structural, relational and individual factors that influence young people’s caring roles in the context of HIV/AIDS. In this chapter, we discuss the implications of these experiences for the needs and requirements for support of families affected by HIV/AIDS. First, we examine the perspectives of young people, parents and service...

  15. Bibliography
    (pp. 309-336)
  16. Index
    (pp. 337-350)
  17. Back Matter
    (pp. 351-351)