A Dictionary of Russian Idioms and Colloquialisms

A Dictionary of Russian Idioms and Colloquialisms: 2,200 Expressions with Examples

Wasyl Jaszczun
Szymon Krynski
Copyright Date: 1967
Pages: 118
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qh53w
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  • Book Info
    A Dictionary of Russian Idioms and Colloquialisms
    Book Description:

    The dictionary covers phraseological fusions, units, and combinations; single words used figuratively; and colloquialisms. Each idiom or colloquialism, translated into English, is accompanied by a sentence in Russian showing its correct use. Approximately one-fifth of the illustrative text is drawn from the classics most frequently studied in undergraduate and graduate Russian courses. An index to writers quoted and a bibliography are included.The work presupposes knowledge of basic Russian grammar and a vocabulary of about 2,000 words. The native speaker of Russian will be able to use this book to develop greater sophistication in English. The advanced student, the teacher, and the specialist who reads Russian will find this an invaluable guide to the subtleties of Russian usage.The work presupposes knowledge of basic Russian grammar and a vocabulary of about 2,000 words. The native speaker of Russian will be able to use this book to develop greater sophistication in English. The advanced student, the teacher, and the specialist who reads Russian will find this an invaluable guide to the subtleties of Russian usage.

    eISBN: 978-0-8229-7562-5
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. v-vi)
    W. J.

    This collection includes the following types of expressions:

    1.Phraseological fusions. These are word combinations whose rigid overall meaning derives neither from their fossilized components no longer independent in use today (e.g., бить баклýши = to twiddle one’s thumbs, to waste one’s time, to loiter, to idle), nor from the accumulative meaning of their viable parts (e.g., замори́ть червячкá = to have a snack, to take a bite). The semantic content of this type of idiom is sometimes not even remotely determined by the relationship of the whole to its parts.

    2.Phraseological units. In these phrases the meaning of the whole...

  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. EXPLANATORY NOTES
    (pp. ix-xii)
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
  6. A DICTIONARY OF RUSSIAN IDIOMS AND COLLOQUIALISMS
    (pp. 1-96)
  7. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 97-100)
  8. INDEX OF WRITERS QUOTED
    (pp. 101-102)