Deleuze and Guattari

Deleuze and Guattari: Aesthetics and Politics

Robert Porter
Copyright Date: 2009
Edition: 1
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qhfq5
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  • Book Info
    Deleuze and Guattari
    Book Description:

    This book examines the relationship between aesthetics and politics based on the philosophies of Gilles Deleuze (1925–1995) and Pierre-Félix Guattari (1930–1992), most famous for their collabarative works Anti-Oedipus (1972) and A Thousand Plateaus (1980).

    eISBN: 978-0-7083-2231-4
    Subjects: Philosophy

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Acknowledgements
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Introduction
    (pp. 1-5)

    This short book is intended to perform a rather specific two-fold function, namely (a) to give a feel for some of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s writings on the arts and (b) to extrapolate from these writings the idea that thinking the political, that political theory if you like, can have aesthetic form.¹ Or, put another way; that the arts as such can be thought to be forms of political theory. So how, then, can Deleuze and Guattari’s writings be mobilized in order to render concrete the idea that the arts can be thought to be forms of political theory?...

  5. 1 Language and Literature
    (pp. 6-40)

    Deleuze and Guattari immediately force us to confront the idea that there is always-already a politics in the things we name ‘language’ and ‘literature’. And in this chapter my concern will be to render concrete and finesse this basic intuition somewhat, drawing explicitly on two of their works:A Thousand PlateausandKafka.¹ In the first part of the chapter, the focus will be on plateau four ofA Thousand Plateaus, ‘postulates of linguistics’, and we will see that Deleuze and Guattari’s analysis of ‘the postulates of linguistics’ is animated by two important and inextricably connected intuitions. First, there is...

  6. 2 Painting
    (pp. 41-70)

    Deleuze and Guattari immediately force us to confront the idea that there is an ethics and politics always-already at play in painting. This, they suggest, is expressed in and through the way painting engages and thinks the ‘face’ or the ‘abstract machine of faciality’. In order to make sense and render this intuition concrete it is important again to draw on Deleuze and Guattari’sA Thousand Plateaus, in particular plateau seven, ‘Year Zero: Faciality’.¹ This will be our focus in the second part of the chapter, and what will begin to emerge here are two images of the political, one...

  7. 3 Architecture
    (pp. 71-100)

    Just as Deleuze and Guattari confront us with the idea that language, literature and painting think the political, so too do they suggest that architecture thinks the political. That is to say, there is a politics of deterritorialization that is proper and peculiar to architecture or, more broadly put, built form, just as there is, for example, a politics of deterritorialization expressed through Kafka’s literary experiments on the real, or Bacon’s deterritorialization of the face. But what, though, is proper and peculiar to the politics of built form, or how does architecture as a form think the political? We shall...

  8. Conclusion
    (pp. 101-106)

    As I said in my introductory remarks, this short book was intended to perform a two-fold function: (a) to give a feel for some of Deleuze and Guattari’s writings on the arts and (b) to extrapolate from these writings the idea that thinking the political, that political theory if you like, can have aesthetic form. Or, put another way, that the arts as such can be thought to be forms of political theory. The general intuition here, to repeat, is that the arts alwaysalready are forms of political theory to the degree that they actively exercise their capacity or autonomy...

  9. Notes
    (pp. 107-128)
  10. Bibliography
    (pp. 129-132)
  11. Index
    (pp. 133-136)