Leave No Doubt

Leave No Doubt: A Credo for Chasing Your Dreams

MIKE BABCOCK
RICK LARSEN
Copyright Date: 2012
Pages: 146
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.cttq9280
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  • Book Info
    Leave No Doubt
    Book Description:

    Mike Babcock is the only hockey coach in the history of the game to lead teams to victory in the Stanley Cup, the World Championship, and the Olympic Games. Currently head coach for the Detroit Red Wings, he is arguably the best coach in the game today. In this book, against the dramatic backdrop of the Canadian men's gold medal victory in Vancouver, Babcock provides an inspiring roadmap for achieving goals and fulfilling dreams. This is not just a book about hockey but a book about life, rooted in Babcock's "Leave No Doubt" credo. Written by Babcock and his longtime friend Rick Larsen, the credo hung on Team Canada's dressing-room wall during their historic run to Olympic gold. It provides a compelling framework for excelling in life. Illuminated by revealing stories about overcoming doubt, "owning pressure," and making a difference, "Leave No Doubt" is based on a firm belief in everyday commitment and a step by step approach to being "better than good enough." The words originally written for Canada's Olympic gold medal hockey team - leave no doubt, every day counts, our determination will define us - inspire an approach to succeeding in life that is relevant to people of all interests and ambitions. Athlete or not, each of us will find valuable guidance in this succinct primer from one of the most respected leaders in sports.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-8679-6
    Subjects: Business

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. FOREWORD Scotty Bowman
    (pp. ix-x)

    I consider it both an honour and privilege to write the foreword to this insightful book,Leave No Doubt, detailing the preparation and experiences that culminated in a gold medal for Canada in ice hockey at the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver.

    Having known Mike Babcock for over ten years, I am truly amazed at the details and thought processes Mike chronicles in this book. Needless to say, I came to respect him for his intensity and his thoroughness. He takes the reader through his early days as a coach, with all the trials and tribulations he encountered. Mike...

  4. TEAM CANADA, 2010
    (pp. xi-2)
  5. THE CREDO
    (pp. 3-4)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 5-8)

    This isn’t just a book about hockey. It’s about life.

    While the story is anchored in Canada’s 2010 gold medal-winning Olympic experience, it’s really about potential, pressure, and turning dreams into reality. This book isn’t a chronological, game-bygame review of the Olympics. It’s a book of perspective; snapshots of moments. It’s about learning moments – big and small.

    Each chapter is headlined by a phrase from the “Leave No Doubt” credo that hung in our dressing room throughout the two weeks of the 2010 Vancouver games. While the credo was written specifically for the Olympics, it represents my approach to life,...

  7. CHAPTER 1 LEAVE NO DOUBT (PART ONE)
    (pp. 9-19)

    Sunday, February 28th, 2010.Vancouver, Canada.

    It was Canada against the United States in the gold medal game for men’s hockey on the final day of the Olympics. Our entire nation was watching. And with 24 seconds left in the third period, the Americans scored the tying goal. My daughter Taylor, who was in the stands, slumped into her seat, put her head into her hands and burst into tears. Her reaction was a very personal one, but what she felt captured the emotion of people across our country.

    Ownership of our game, our dream, our destiny was going into overtime....

  8. CHAPTER 2 THIS IS OUR GAME
    (pp. 20-28)

    “Henderson has scored for Canada …”

    Paul Henderson’s goal in the last minute of the final game lifted Canada to victory in the 1972 Summit Series against the Soviet Union. He rescued our pride as a hockey power and became a national folk hero. I remember the excitement of that moment. Time seemed to stop as fans across the country watched from the edge of their seats. They sat in homes and offices. And in schools too.

    I was a nine-year-old boy in Leaf Rapids, Manitoba. It was a newly built mining town in the northern part of the province....

  9. CHAPTER 3 THIS IS OUR TIME
    (pp. 29-37)

    Before I left for Vancouver, we sat down as a family to talk about all of us going to the Olympics.

    It was a once-in-a-lifetime thing. Rene and I sat down with our three kids – Allie, Michael, and Taylor – and spoke about doing it right. Allie and Michael would have to miss a couple weeks of high school and Taylor would have tomiss a couple weeks of junior high, but they wanted to be there. And I wouldn’t have had it any other way. We talked about being grateful for the chance we had been given. We talked about the...

  10. CHAPTER 4 TWO WEEKS FOR THE AGES
    (pp. 38-46)

    Difference-makers believe that if you can dream it, you can do it.

    When I was named head coach of the Olympic hockey team, the sense of responsibility hit me hard. This wasn’t about me, this was about our game. This was about our country, about our national pride. And this was about having a chance to win the Olympic gold medal – on Canadian soil.

    Two weeks in February would be a defining time. Two weeks full of meaningful moments.

    It was two weeks that would make a lifelong difference to the players, coaches, and management of Team Canada. And it...

  11. CHAPTER 5 EVERY DAY COUNTS
    (pp. 47-55)

    Tuesday, February 16th, 2010.

    It was time to drop the puck and do what we do.

    The roar of the sold-out crowd was deafening. This was Game One for the 2010 Olympic team. You could almost feel the level of expectation taking the roof off Canada Hockey Place.

    I think some media people figured we should score every time we touched the puck against Norway.

    I knew that given the buildup, nothing could satisfy expectations out of the gate. And I knew every move, line change and tactic would be put under a microscope. We beat Norway 8–0. We...

  12. CHAPTER 6 EVERY MEETING MATTERS
    (pp. 56-62)

    You shouldn’t have a meeting if it’s not going to matter.

    Meetings need to provide an action plan. If they don’t, they’re a waste of time.

    I have a rule I learned from Scotty Bowman. I don’t talk to players after a game. I shake their hands when we win and I leave them alone when we lose. You want to say the right thing, at the right time, for the right impact. Inmy experience, talking to players after a loss isn’t usually the right time. Things are said in the heat of a moment that can be counter-productive or...

  13. CHAPTER 7 IT’S ABOUT OUR COUNTRY
    (pp. 63-66)

    Some dreams are bigger than any one person.

    2010 Olympic gold in hockey was our country’s dream. The Swedes had won the gold in 2006. The Russians had won backto-back world championships. The time was right to re-establish Canada’s hockey supremacy.

    We knew fromthe very beginning we had what it took to make the dream a reality.

    Steve Yzerman set the tone the first night at the summer camp in 2009. He made it clear it wasn’t about any one of us. He told the players, “I’m the general manager. Ken Holland, Kevin Lowe, and Doug Armstrong are allmore experienced...

  14. CHAPTER 8 RISING TO EVERY OCCASION
    (pp. 67-72)

    Since 1972 Canada versus Russia has been the most intense rivalry in hockey.

    The anticipation leading up to our game with Russia was incredible. You could feel it in the air. It was as if the anticipation from every part of the country had travelled toVancouver and was sitting in the seats at Canada Hockey Place.

    This would be a game remembered by hockey fans for generations to come. Many had expected these two teams to meet for the gold medal. Many now felt the winner would go on and take the gold. One thing was for certain, the loser...

  15. CHAPTER 9 EVERY PRACTICE MAKES A DIFFERENCE
    (pp. 73-79)

    I believe you play how you practice.

    An Olympic opportunity has to be seen as a once-in-a-lifetime thing. Some people get there more than once, but it’s not something you count on.

    We were determined that our preparation would be equal to our opportunity.

    I believe preparation, practice, and learning go hand-in-hand.

    Practice involves working to make yourself better. Whether you’re a player or a coach, an employee or a boss, you have to personally work to get better constantly. And that means you can’t ever stop learning.

    I believe that anyone who’s great at what they do is a...

  16. CHAPTER 10 33 MILLION CANADIANS
    (pp. 80-85)

    No matter how big you dream, how committed or intense you are, I believe you miss out if you don’t enjoy the process.

    We went to Vancouver to win Olympic gold. Absolutely.

    I believe we also went to Vancouver to experience the Olympic Games. To have fun. To feel the energy. To soak in the national pride. To be among our fellow Canadians and visitors fromaround the world.

    I loved the Olympic journey. I loved thatmy family loved it. I loved that every single person in Vancouver seemed to love it.

    I think the volunteers did a great job representing...

  17. CHAPTER 11 HOME ICE IS AN ADVANTAGE
    (pp. 86-93)

    You can either embrace pressure or it can own you.

    Hosting the Olympics, playing on home ice was something special.

    People talked about it adding pressure. And it did. Playing for your country is different. The stakes are different. The sense of pride is different. It’s not only about what you do – it’s about who you are. It’s about who we are as Canadians. People had put their faith in me, our staff, and our players. We had to make a decision to embrace and enjoy it or let the pressure crush us.

    We chose to embrace it. If you...

  18. CHAPTER 12 NOTHING CAN DISTRACT US
    (pp. 94-100)

    As an organization, Hockey Canada had a singular focus.

    We were going to be the best in the world. And we were going to win the gold medal to prove it.

    I think relationships are critical to an organization or a team’s success. It’s important to know, trust and respect the people around you. That kind of connection allows you to focus on the important stuff.

    It was important to me that the relationship I had with Steve Yzerman was anchored in mutual respect. I respect Steve as a person and as a family guy. He’s a great leader and...

  19. CHAPTER 13 NOTHING WILL STOP US
    (pp. 101-108)

    Life’s speed bumps should never stop us – they should only help us go forward a little smarter.

    I’ve been to the Stanley Cup finals three times. I’ve won once. I’ve lost twice in Game Seven. You want to talk about speed bumps? That’s a tough way to lose. To have a chance to win it all means a lot. It takes a lot too – it takes wining 15 playoff games to get there. It’s an incredible process. You learn, you grow, you get better and stronger through the playoff process. The stakes are higher. The learning curve is steeper. The...

  20. CHAPTER 14 OUR DETERMINATION WILL DEFINE US
    (pp. 109-112)

    For me, determination has always been about doing, not saying.

    It’s easy to talk.

    Delivering is a different thing. You can’t deliver anything of meaning unless you’re determined.

    There are a lot of people who are determined enough to be there until it gets hard. You know these people. You’ve seen themin action (or inaction) at your office, your school, your PTA meetings, at team practices or in a big game.

    The reality is that when you’re chasing a dream, you’ve got to go until there’s no doubt.

    Our semi-final against Slovakia was a case in point.

    The Slovaks were...

  21. CHAPTER 15 WE ARE BUILT TO WIN
    (pp. 113-116)

    We all have to build toward our dreams.

    And dreams like Olympic hockey gold don’t happen without a lot of work, from a lot of people.

    One thing that Steve and I share is a belief in doing your homework. Nobody would out-prepare us.

    That’s critical because when you are playing the best of the best, success is in the margins. Everything counts. Everything makes a difference. Every detail is important. Small differences can have a big impact – 211 degrees is hot water, 212 degrees is steam. And that can drive a locomotive. One degree more from a goalie, a...

  22. CHAPTER 16 A TEAM OF CHARACTER
    (pp. 117-122)

    You can’t cheat your way to your dreams.

    If you want to live your dreams and make a difference, you have to do things with integrity. Shortcuts get you lost.

    I’ve mentioned respect before, but I believe it’s so important in everything we do.

    You have to respect the process. You have to respect yourself. You have to respect the game. You have to respect the competition. And you have to respect your team. I think that respecting other people is essential – in sports and in life. Respect is a key to character.

    A great way to respect other people...

  23. CHAPTER 17 A TEAM OF DESTINY
    (pp. 123-126)

    The day before our gold medal game, I went to see the gold medal curling match with my family.

    I could have been holed up in my room re-watching tape, reviewing the match-ups again, or over-analyzing the game plan. I could have, but I didn’t. We had done the work. We knew we were ready. I knew I was ready. So my family went to the curling match. And we had so much fun. Curling doesn’t have a reputation for thrills, but I think it was the most exciting sporting event I had ever seen. The crowd was so into...

  24. CHAPTER 18 LET THE WORLD BE WARNED
    (pp. 127-133)

    Sunday, February 28th, 2010.

    The Americans scored with 24 seconds left in the goldmedal game.

    Stunned silence across Canada.

    Jonathan Toews and Corey Perry scored the first two goals of the game for us and many people were assuming it was over. But give the Americans credit. They were a talented group that played with a lot of heart, and they battled back.

    My wife Rene told me after the game that as disappointed as she was when the Americans scored, she didn’t doubt the outcome would be in our favour. She described her mindset as an “eerie calm.” She...

  25. CHAPTER 19 LEAVE NO DOUBT (PART TWO)
    (pp. 134-135)

    I started this book by saying the Leave No Doubt credo was a call to action. I said it was an approach that could help us achieve our dreams and make a difference. I told the story of how it came into being and I described the place it took in the dressing roomduring our journey toward winning Olympic gold.

    That journey ended more than two years ago now. In retrospect, the credo feels more powerful than ever. And in the world we live in, it feels more important than ever to chase our dreams. I can tell you that...

  26. THE BABCOCK DICTIONARY
    (pp. 136-138)
  27. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. 139-140)
  28. [Illustrations]
    (pp. None)