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Co-producing research

Co-producing research: A community development approach

Sarah Banks
Angie Hart
Kate Pahl
Paul Ward
Copyright Date: 2019
Edition: 1
https://doi.org/10.2307/j.ctv80cccs
Pages: 192
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctv80cccs
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  • Book Info
    Co-producing research
    Book Description:

    Offering a critical examination of the nature of co-produced research, this important new book draws on materials and case studies from the ESRC funded project ‘Imagine – connecting communities through research’. Outlining a community development approach to co-production, which privileges community agency, the editors link with wider debates about the role of universities within communities. With policy makers in mind, contributors discuss in clear and accessible language what co-production between community groups and academics can achieve. The book will be valuable for practitioners within community contexts, and researchers interested in working with communities, activists, and artists.Offering a critical examination of the nature of co-produced research, this important new book draws on materials and case studies from the ESRC funded project ‘Imagine – connecting communities through research’. Outlining a community development approach to co-production, which privileges community agency, the editors link with wider debates about the role of universities within communities. With policy makers in mind, contributors discuss in clear and accessible language what co-production between community groups and academics can achieve. The book will be valuable for practitioners within community contexts, and researchers interested in working with communities, activists, and artists.

    eISBN: 978-1-4473-4077-5
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Series editors’ foreword
    (pp. xii-xii)
    Keri Facer and George McKay

    Around the globe, communities of all shapes and sizes are increasingly seeking an active role in producing knowledge about how to understand, represent and shape their world for the better. At the same time, academic research is increasingly realising the critical importance of community knowledge in producing robust insights into contemporary change in all fields. New collaborations, networks, relationships and dialogues are being formed between academic and community partners, characterised by a radical intermingling of disciplinary traditions and by creative methodological experimentation.

    There is a groundswell of research practice that aims to build new knowledge, address longstanding silences and exclusions,...

  2. Preface and acknowledgements
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
    Sarah Banks, Angie Hart, Kate Pahl and Paul Ward
  3. ONE Co-producing research: A community development approach
    (pp. 1-18)
    Sarah Banks, Angie Hart, Kate Pahl and Paul Ward

    This book focuses on a ‘community development approach’ to the co-production of research. By this we mean research undertaken collaboratively by several parties that values multiple perspectives and voices; contributes to creating and developing communities of place, interest and identity; builds collective capacity for action; and works towards social change.

    The contributors were all involved in a five-year research project, Imagine — Connecting communities through research (see www. imaginecommunity. org. uk). The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded the project, focusing on exploring the contexts in which civic engagement takes place — that is, how people become engaged in civic life....

  4. Part I: Forming communities of inquiry and developing shared practices

    • TWO Between research and community development: Negotiating a contested space for collaboration and creativity
      (pp. 21-48)
      Sarah Banks, Andrea Armstrong, Anne Bonner, Yvonne Hall, Patrick Harman, Luke Johnston, Clare Levi, Kath Smith and Ruth Taylor

      This chapter explores the interface between co-produced research and community development, drawing on work undertaken in North East England as part of the Imagine project. Discussion of the process and outcomes of Imagine North East provides fruitful material for contributing to perennial debates about whether certain forms of co-produced research (especially participatory action research) are, in fact, indistinguishable from community development. In this chapter we offer a brief overview of the work of Imagine North East before outlining the debates about the relationship between co-production and community development. We then examine three elements of Imagine North East: (1) an academic-led...

    • THREE A radical take on co-production? Community partner leadership in research
      (pp. 49-68)
      Susanne Martikke, Andrew Church and Angie Hart

      In this chapter, we examine a research collaboration between Susanne Martikke, Research Officer at the Greater Manchester Centre for Voluntary Organisation (GMCVO), and two academics from the University of Brighton, Andrew Church and Angie Hart. Because all of the partners were professional researchers, the research collaboration has to be seen as a very specific case. It would have been more challenging for someone who was not a professional researcher to play the role Susanne played on the project. However, it must also be acknowledged that being a researcher in a voluntary and community sector (VCS) organisation like GMCVO differs from...

    • FOUR Community-university partnership research retreats: A productive force for developing communities of research practice
      (pp. 69-92)
      Josh Cameron, Beverly Wenger-Trayner, Etienne Wenger-Trayner, Angie Hart, Lisa Buttery, Elias Kourkoutas, Suna Eryigit-Madzwamuse and Anne Rathbone

      Etienne Wenger (1998) applied the term ‘communities of practice’ (CoP) to groups of people who come together to understand and respond to a shared topic of concern, emphasising examples from work organisations. This is something that human society has always done, but in analysing the process and exploring how to cultivate it, social learning theorists consider how to overcome challenges and support effective CoP collaborations (Wenger et al, 2002). Most published literature on CoP has reported on mono-professional contexts (Hart et al, 2013). However, the concept and approach lends itself to mobilising knowledge and experiences from more diverse sources. In...

  5. Part II: Co-creating through and with the arts

    • FIVE How does arts practice inform a community development approach to the co-production of research?
      (pp. 95-114)
      David Bell, Steve Pool, Kim Streets, Natalie Walton and Kate Pahl

      At the heart of this chapter is a recorded conversation between four people working at the interface between art and research. This Introduction, along with the Conclusion, is designed to situate the conversation within the wider context of arts practice and co-produced research.

      Contemporary art practice has experienced a paradigm shift from the idea of art as sitting within the gallery to a more diffuse concept of art as collaborative and participatory (Bishop, 2012). These approaches involve people building knowledge together, and rely on a de-centring or de-materialising of the art object to suggest something new. This chapter sits within...

    • SIX Co-designing for a better future: Re-imagining the modernist dream at Park Hill, Sheffield
      (pp. 115-134)
      Prue Chiles, Louise Ritchie and Kate Pahl

      In this chapter we explore the possibilities for creative co-production, with Park Hill flats in Sheffield as the site of our enquiry. We describe how we collaborated with a small community of new residents in this newly regenerated and very well known ‘housing estate’. We make a case for ‘making’, using drawings, models and images as a way to think about the residents’ lived experience and how it might change and allow re-imagining. In this case we were thinking towards a future living in Park Hill and the opportunity the residents have to build a better community. Our aim was...

    • SEVEN On not doing co-produced research: The methodological possibilities and limitations of co-producing research with participants in a prison
      (pp. 135-152)
      Elizabeth Chapman Hoult

      To what extent is it possible to adhere to the principles of a community development approach to co-produced research, when the community involved resides in a prison? Pain et al’s definition of co-produced research as ‘research which is conducted together by a community, organisation or group with academic researchers’ (2015, p 4) suggests parity between community and academic partners in the realisation of the project plan. Genuinely co-produced research is underpinned by the commitment to constructing research questions as they emerge around the concerns of the community. Where possible this is accompanied by a commitment to selecting and developing methodologies...

  6. Part III: Co-designing outputs

    • EIGHT Co-production as a new way of seeing: Using photographic exhibitions to challenge dominant stigmatising discourses
      (pp. 155-180)
      Ben Kyneswood

      In this chapter I explore historic regeneration in Hillfields, an area of inner-city Coventry, UK, that could be described as suffering from ‘territorial stigmatisation’ (Wacquant, 2007, p 66). This work in Hillfields was part of the Imagine research project, forming a work package focusing on historical aspects of civic participation along with Imagine North East (see Chapter 2). Scoping interviews with current and former residents and community workers suggested that the poor reputation of the area developed in the post-war period, created by both outsiders and insiders, leading to Hillfields being perceived as a space, not a place, a ‘potential...

    • NINE ‘Who controls the past controls the future’: Black history and community development
      (pp. 181-202)
      Shabina Aslam, Milton Brown, Onyeka Nubia, Elizabeth Pente, Natalie Pinnock-Hamilton, Mandeep Samra and Paul Ward

      What role does ‘Black history’ play in community development? This chapter discusses the ways in which Black and Asian minority ethnic (BAME) communities have been excluded from contributing to national and local histories, depriving them of resources that would enable them to develop coherent alternative perspectives on the British narrative. It focuses on the intersection of history and community development. It concentrates on local people and organisations and how they have used Black history in a variety of community-based activities in collaboration with the University of Huddersfield. Huddersfield, in the North of England, has a population of around 165,000, of...

    • TEN Conclusion: Imagining different communities and making them happen
      (pp. 203-210)
      Paul Ward, Sarah Banks, Angie Hart and Kate Pahl

      In this book we have explored and developed the idea of a community development approach to the co-production of research. This approach emerged during the five years of Imagine – Connecting communities through research. Many communities are excluded from decision-making processes and are marginalised in relation to civic engagement and community participation. The Imagine project tried to imagine better communities and make them happen, but with a difference. We tried to do this together as a partnership between people based largely in universities and those based mainly in non-academic communities of place, interest and identity. This enabled the emergence of discussions...