Research Report

CLEAN ENERGY BLUEPRINT: A Smarter National Energy Policy for Today and the Future

Steven Clemmer
Deborah Donovan
Alan Nogee
Jeff Deyette
Copyright Date: Oct. 1, 2001
Pages: 52
https://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep00001
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Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. iii-iii)
  3. Figures
    (pp. iv-iv)
  4. Tables
    (pp. iv-iv)
  5. Acknowledgements
    (pp. v-vi)
  6. Executive Summary
    (pp. vii-xii)
  7. CHAPTER 1 THE NEED FOR NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY
    (pp. 1-2)

    Can America develop a national energy system that will provide security and jobs, and also leave a heritage of clean air, clean water, and pristine wilderness areas for the children and grandchildren?

    Can the United States increase international good will and credibility by reducing carbon dioxide emissions that threaten to destabilize the global climate, and also have economic growth?

    Can the country plan for the long term and also respond to immediate problems and meet short-term energy needs?

    Can the nation develop a truly balanced portfolio of clean energy solutions that will stop wasting energy and also develop diverse, domestic...

  8. CHAPTER 2 THE CLEAN ENERGY BLUEPRINT
    (pp. 3-8)

    UCS and its co-authors analyzed a set of policies that includes standards and incentives to increase investment in clean energy by consumers and the electricity sector and to help overcome existing market barriers that currently slow investment. UCS has analyzed transportation efficiency policies in a separate report, Drilling in Detroit (UCS, 2001). The analysis reported here examines the following 10 renewable energy and energy efficiency policies:

    renewable portfolio standard

    public benefits fund

    net metering

    production tax credit

    increased R&D funding

    combined heat and power

    improved efficiency standards

    enhanced building codes

    energy efficiency tax incentives

    industrial energy efficiency measures

    We also...

  9. CHAPTER 3 OUR METHODS
    (pp. 9-12)

    UCS used the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), a computer model maintained by the US Energy Information Administration, to compare the costs and benefits of the Clean Energy Blueprint described in Chapter 2 with business as usual.² The business-as-usual scenario is based on Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (EIA, 2000a), the EIA’s most recent long-term forecast of US energy supply, demand, and prices. The year 1999 is the last year of history in the model, which makes projections through 2020.

    UCS modified several NEMS assumptions for renewable energy in order to model these technologies more accurately and applied these modifications to...

  10. CHAPTER 4 WHAT WE FOUND
    (pp. 13-30)

    Below we present the results for two policy scenarios compared to the business-as-usual scenario. The first scenario illustrates the impacts of the full package of Clean Energy Blueprint policies. The second identifies the impacts of the subset of the Blueprint policies included in the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Investment Act of 2001 (S. 1333)—the renewable portfolio standard, public benefits fund, and net metering—plus increased R&D funding for renewable energy.

    The findings of our analysis fall into five categories. First, we identify the impacts of the policy scenarios on total energy use. Second, we present the impacts of...

  11. CHAPTER 5 ADDITIONAL BENEfiTS OF THE CLEAN ENERGY BLUEPRINT
    (pp. 31-34)

    While they are not explicitly quantified in this study, the Clean Energy Blueprint would also provide many additional environmental, economic, and national security benefits.

    By reducing the use of natural gas and coal, the Clean Energy Blueprint decreases the need to expand natural gas drilling and coal mining, creating less pressure to open public lands and sensitive areas to fossil fuel exploration. Less gas must be transported, lessening pressure for the 301,000 miles in natural gas transmission and distribution pipelines that the National Energy Plan says must be built (NEPDG, 2001). Less coal mining means less damage to land and...

  12. CHAPTER 6 A PROMISING ENERGY FUTURE
    (pp. 35-36)

    The nation needs a balanced approach to meeting future energy demands—one that invests in clean and efficient technologies both to reduce energy demands and to increase energy supplies. This analysis by UCS and its co-authors shows that energy efficiency and renewable energy sources can meet a large share of the country’s energy needs both today and in the future, including replacing some of the most polluting power plants that operate today. Moreover, they do so while providing health and environmental benefits, lower energy bills, and net savings to consumers.

    The policies in the Clean Energy Blueprint are practical and...

  13. References
    (pp. 37-40)