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Research Report

NATO’S NEW STRATEGY:: STABILITY GENERATION

Franklin D. Kramer
Hans Binnendijk
Daniel S. Hamilton
Copyright Date: Sep. 1, 2015
Published by: Atlantic Council
Pages: 21
OPEN ACCESS
https://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep03628
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Table of Contents

  1. (pp. 3-3)

    Effective strategy requires an understanding of, and a balance among, ends, ways, and means, with an appropriate calculation of risk concerning each element and the overall result. Other words can and have been utilized in the definition of strategy: “ends” are objectives; “ways” are concepts or policies; and “means” are capabilities or resources. But no matter the terms used, an effective strategy requires the combination of all three elements: knowing where one is headed, how one plans to get there, what means are available and required, and an evaluation of the risks involved.

    NATO historically has had two effective strategies...

  2. (pp. 4-6)

    Effective strategy requires an understanding of, and a balance among, ends, ways, and means, with an appropriate calculation of risk concerning each element and the overall result. Other words can and have been utilized in the definition of strategy: “ends” are objectives; “ways” are concepts or policies; and “means” are capabilities or resources. But no matter the terms used, an effective strategy requires the combination of all three elements: knowing where one is headed, how one plans to get there, what means are available and required, and an evaluation of the risks involved.

    NATO historically has had two effective strategies....

  3. (pp. 7-15)

    The fundamental goals of NATO and its member nations are to assure the security, prosperity, and freedom of their populations. In a globalized world, however, with its multiple interdependencies, the international security requisite to achieving those goals is heavily dependent on the impact of and interaction with other nations. NATO’s key challenges come from regions adjacent to its borders, including cross-border challenges, and resilience vulnerabilities within the NATO nations themselves. While the critical adversarial actors are different—in the East, a nation-state organized along autocratic lines; in the South, multiple nonstate actors that purport to rely on theocratic justifications; and...

  4. (pp. 16-16)
    Franklin D. Kramer, Hans Binnendijk and Dan S. Hamilton

    NATO has historically been an extremely effective alliance, in large part because its strategy met the requirements of the time. Today, NATO needs to adopt a new strategy of stability generation based on collective defense, crisis management, and cooperative security with the additional task of resilience and the concomitant capabilities necessary to promote success in the twenty-first century....