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Research Report

Civilian crisis management:: the EU way

Catriona Gourlay
Damien Helly
Isabelle Ioannides
Radek Khol
Agnieszka Nowak
Pedro Serrano
Edited by Agnieszka Nowak
Copyright Date: Jun. 1, 2006
Pages: 150
OPEN ACCESS
https://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep06945
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Table of Contents

  1. (pp. 9-14)
    Agnieszka Nowak

    European integration is a project born from the desire to secure a lasting peace between European nations. From the beginning, the European Community underpinned the reconciliation and harmonious development of Western Europe, helped to increase its stability, raised standards of living and promoted closer relations between its Member States. Subsequently, through development co-operation, external assistance programmes, through the process of enlargement and through the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP), the European Union has been seeking to project stability and lasting peace not only within but also beyond its borders.

    Despite its own experience of a whole array of policies...

  2. (pp. 15-38)
    Agnieszka Nowak

    Since January 2003 when the first ever ESDP operation – the Police Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina – was launched, the EU has deployed another fifteen civilian and military operations.¹ Ten of these are of a civilian nature and they have been deployed not only in the Western Balkans but also in the Southern Caucasus, Sub- Saharan Africa, the Middle East and South-East Asia. The growing number of civilian operations, their larger geographical scope and the various types of engagement they require, shows that the EU has made faster operational progress in the ‘soft’ dimension of crisis management, than in...

  3. (pp. 39-48)
    Pedro Serrano

    Activities in the field of ESDP are relatively broad. Many of the efforts carried out in the last five years have concentrated on the development of ESDP as a policy instrument (concepts, structures, procedures, capabilities, etc.). Also, after recent natural disasters and major terrorist attacks, the use of tools developed in the context of ESDP for disaster and emergency relief is now being considered. But, undoubtedly, the main aim of ESDP in its present stage of development is crisis management actions. With twelve ESDP missions or actions currently deployed, and more than three years since the launching of the first...

  4. (pp. 49-68)
    Catriona Gourlay

    Although the term ‘civilian crisis management’ was first used in the context of the development of the non-military capacities to be used in the second pillar framework of the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP), the Community has long engaged in a range of activities that provide assistance to third countries in crisis. In line with the overarching objectives set out in the Treaty establishing the Economic Community (TEC), notably the promotion of stable conditions for human and economic development and the promotion of human rights, democracy and fundamental freedoms¹ and the ‘political commitment to pursue conflict prevention as one...

  5. (pp. 69-86)
    Isabelle Ioannides

    The recent enlargement of the EU, which brought the Western Balkans into its immediate neighbourhood, has led to the increased importance of security- and institution-building in the region for Europe’s long-term interests. The EU has been engaged in the management of crises and the reconstruction of the Western Balkans for more than a decade, and is the single largest donor to the region. The Stabilisation and Association Process (SAP), subsequent declarations – especially pledges made at the Thessaloniki Summit in June 2003 –, the move of the Western Balkans’ portfolio from DG RELEX to DG Enlargement with the Barroso Commission,...

  6. (pp. 87-102)
    Damien Helly

    Since 2001, the EU has upgraded its political visibility in the South Caucasus. An EU Special Representative (EUSR) for the South Caucasus was appointed on 7 July 2003¹ whose mandate has been successively extended since then.² The EUSR is expected to assist conflict resolution processes in the region and to ensure co-ordination, consistency and effectiveness of the EU’s action in the South Caucasus.³

    In 2003, the ‘Rose Revolution’ in Georgia created a new momentum for democratisation and ‘westernisation’,⁴ and was followed by the inclusion of the three Caucasian countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia) into the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) on...

  7. (pp. 103-122)
    Catriona Gourlay

    The challenge of civil-civil co-ordination is central to realizing the EU’s strategic security objectives in relation to effective crisis management. The European Security Strategy (ESS), agreed by the European Council in December 2003, specifically calls for a ‘more coherent’ approach. It recognizes that ‘over the years we have created a number of different instruments, each of which has its own structure and rationale’ and argues that:

    ‘the challenge now is to bring together the different instruments and capabilities: European assistance programmes and the European Development Fund, military and civilian capabilities from Member States and other instruments. All of these can...

  8. (pp. 123-138)
    Radek Khol

    This Chaillot Paper focuses primarily on the internal challenges of consolidating EU civilian crisis management and one of the important aspects of these challenges is to ensure coherence between civil and military capabilities. Such coherence often lies at the heart of effective EU external action. A new dynamic security environment requires the use of a wide range of instruments available to the EU and their use in the most effective and co-ordinated way. Civil-military interactions are increasingly a crucial part of EU operations. The two concepts of Civil-Military Co-operation (CIMIC) and Civil-Military Co-ordination (CMCO) apply to this area and it...

  9. (pp. 139-140)
    Agnieszka Nowak

    Being a relative latecomer to peace support activities, the EU has been working hard over the last couple of years to establish itself as a credible security provider. If this status is to be sustained in the future, the EU will have to build upon the added value of having a whole array of crisis management instruments at its disposal and, more importantly, to prove that it is able to use them in a coherent manner in order to project stability and lasting peace. The challenge of coherence is particularly needed in the civilian dimension of EU involvement in crisis...