Research Report

Narrating Atrocity:: Uses of Evidence in the Political Asylum Process

Amy Shuman
Carol Bohmer
Copyright Date: Jan. 1, 2010
Pages: 21
OPEN ACCESS
https://www.jstor.org/stable/resrep13411
  • Cite this Item

Table of Contents

  1. (pp. 5-19)

    Political asylum is one remedy for human rights abuses. By offering safe haven to people fleeing persecution in their homelands, countries providing political asylum acknowledge that violence can make some places too dangerous for members of particular groups. Although political asylum is historically connected to human rights, in practice, there is a significant disconnect between the two. We explore this disconnect at two levels. First, we examine the relationship between written documentation and oral narrative testimony in political asylum hearings as genres of representation that display and rely on different norms of evidence. Second, we consider how these evidentiary differences...