Skip to Main Content
Have library access? Log in through your library
The Poems of Exile

The Poems of Exile: Tristia and the Black Sea Letters

OVID
TRANSLATED WITH AN INTRODUCTION, NOTES, AND GLOSSARY BY PETER GREEN
Copyright Date: 2005
Edition: 1
Pages: 535
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt14btgbm
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    The Poems of Exile
    Book Description:

    In the year A.D. 8, Emperor Augustus sentenced the elegant, brilliant, and sophisticated Roman poet Ovid to exile-permanently, as it turned out-at Tomis, modern Constantza, on the Romanian coast of the Black Sea. The real reason for the emperor's action has never come to light, and all of Ovid's subsequent efforts to secure either a reprieve or, at the very least, a transfer to a less dangerous place of exile failed. Two millennia later, the agonized, witty, vivid, nostalgic, and often slyly malicious poems he wrote at Tomis remain as fresh as the day they were written, a testament for exiles everywhere, in all ages.The two books of thePoems of Exile,theLamentations (Tristia)and theBlack Sea Letters (Epistulae ex Ponto),chronicle Ovid's impressions of Tomis-its appalling winters, bleak terrain, and sporadic raids by barbarous nomads-as well as his aching memories and ongoing appeals to his friends and his patient wife to intercede on his behalf. While pretending to have lost his old literary skills and even to be forgetting his Latin, in thePoems of ExileOvid in fact displays all his virtuoso poetic talent, now concentrated on one objective: ending the exile. But his rhetorical message falls on obdurately deaf ears, and his appeals slowly lose hope. A superb literary artist to the end, Ovid offers an authentic, unforgettable panorama of the death-in-life he endured at Tomis.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-93137-4
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

Export Selected Citations Export to NoodleTools Export to RefWorks Export to EasyBib Export a RIS file (For EndNote, ProCite, Reference Manager, Zotero, Mendeley...) Export a Text file (For BibTex)
  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. FOREWORD TO THE 2005 EDITION
    (pp. vii-xii)

    It is now a decade since the first publication of this version of the exilic poems. When I originally undertook it, my aim was to produce an English equivalent of Ovid’s elegiacs that captured – as near as was possible in an uninflected language with no fixed vowel-quantities – both the exact sense and the structural rhythms of the original. If it also at any point managed to suggest Ovid’s verbal wit and poetic sharpness, I figured that would be luck over and above the ordinary. I also was very conscious of the need to fill in the essential historical...

  4. PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. xiii-xvii)
    P. M. G.
  5. Map
    (pp. xviii-xviii)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xix-lv)

    Publius Ovidius Naso was born on 20 March 43 bc – the year after Caesar’s assassination – and grew up during the final violent death-throes of the Roman Republic: he was a boy of twelve when news arrived of Octavian’s victory over Antony at Actium (31 bc), and his adolescence coincided with the early years of thepax Augusta. His family was from Sulmo (the modern Sulmona) in the Abruzzi, and had enjoyed provincial equestrian status for generations. As Ovid himself points out with satisfaction (Am. I.3.8, III.15.5–6;Tr. IV.10.7–8;EPIV.8.17–18), they were landed gentry, not...

  7. TEXTUAL VARIANTS
    (pp. lvi-lxi)
  8. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. lxii-lxxvi)
  9. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. lxxvii-lxxxiv)
  10. Tristia

  11. Black Sea Letters

  12. NOTES AND REFERENCES
    (pp. 201-381)
  13. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 382-426)
  14. INDEX
    (pp. 427-452)