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The Gnat and Other Minor Poems of Virgil

The Gnat and Other Minor Poems of Virgil

TRANSLATED BY DAVID R. SLAVITT
Foreword by Gordon Williams
Copyright Date: 2011
Edition: 1
Pages: 88
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pnbfg
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  • Book Info
    The Gnat and Other Minor Poems of Virgil
    Book Description:

    These delightful poems—by turns whimsical, beautiful, and vulgar—seem to have primarily survived because they were attributed to Virgil. But in David R. Slavitt’s imaginative and appealing translations, they stand firmly on their own merits. Slavitt brings to this little-known body of verse a fresh voice, vividly capturing the tone and style of the originals while conveying a lively sense of fun.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-94999-7
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. ix-xii)
    Gordon Williams

    The only link that unites the medley of poems in The Virgilian Appendix is the fact that they were tossed together into one manuscript. Then the title Appendix Virgiliana was invented for this collection in the sixteenth century. The word “Appendix” asserts that these poems are an addendum to the three canonical works of Virgil(Eclogues, Georgics, Aeneid)that established for the Renaissance the ideal career of the poet.

    In fact, not one of the poems in the Appendix can plausibly be attributed to Virgil. What needs emphasis in this context is that poetry was a major source of entertainment...

  4. Introduction
    (pp. xiii-2)

    This mixed bag of poems was called the Virgilian Appendix by Josephus Justus Scaliger, the Dutch philologist and historian, in 1572. There had been a tradition of crediting Virgil with the writing of various of these poems, and Statius, Lucan, Martial, Quintilian, and Suetonius could all be cited (not always directly or convincingly) as authorities. Modern scholars have decided, however, that none of the poems is likely to have been Virgil’s.

    The effects of the misattribution have been equivocal. The advantage has been that the poems were preserved, Virgil’s name having had a certain authority. (Even today, poetry editors look...

  5. THE GNAT
    (pp. 3-20)
  6. THE BARMAID
    (pp. 21-26)
  7. CURSES
    (pp. 27-32)
  8. LYDIA
    (pp. 33-38)
  9. PRIAPUS POEMS
    (pp. 39-46)
  10. PESTO (MORETUM)
    (pp. 47-54)
  11. THE GOOD MAN
    (pp. 55-58)
  12. YES AND NO
    (pp. 59-62)
  13. BUDDING ROSES
    (pp. 63-67)
  14. Back Matter
    (pp. 68-68)