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Ours

Ours

COLE SWENSEN
Copyright Date: 2008
Edition: 1
Pages: 118
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pp82p
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  • Book Info
    Ours
    Book Description:

    These poems are about gardens, particularly the seventeenth-century French baroque gardens designed by the father of the form, André Le Nôtre. While the poems focus on such examples as Versailles, which Le Nôtre created for Louis XIV, they also explore the garden as metaphor. Using the imagery of the garden, Cole Swensen considers everything from human society to the formal structure of poetry. She looks in particular at the concept of public versus private property, asking who actually owns a garden? A gentle irony accompanies the question because in French, the phrase "le nôtre" means "ours." Whereas all of Le Nôtre's gardens were designed and built for the aristocracy, today most are public parks. Swensen probes the two senses of "le nôtre" to discover where they intersect, overlap, or blur.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-94156-4
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-v)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vi-viii)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xi-xii)

    André Le Nôtre (1613 – 1700) is often considered the father of the French formal garden. As the son and grandson of royal gardeners, he was born in the Tuileries and inherited a tradition already quite old. He took those traditions and adapted them to early Enlightenment thinking, incorporating contemporary mathematical and optical techniques, such as anamorphic perspective, to create gardens unprecedented in their appeal to both the eye and the mind.

    Versailles is his best-known work, but he played a crucial role in many other gardens, including those at Chantilly, Saint-Cloud, Sceaux, the Tuileries, and Vaux-le-Vicomte. This last was...

  5. HISTORY

  6. PRINCIPLES

    • IN AN EFFORT TO MAKE THE GARDEN A STANDING PROOF
      (pp. 19-19)
    • CERTAIN PRINCIPLES MUST BE OBSERVED
      (pp. 20-20)
    • A GARDEN OCCURS IN FOUR STAGES
      (pp. 21-21)
    • A GARDEN AS A LETTER
      (pp. 22-22)
    • A GARDEN AS BETWEEN
      (pp. 23-23)
    • A GARDEN AS A UNIT OF MEASURE
      (pp. 24-24)
    • ANAMORPHOSIS
      (pp. 25-25)
    • EUCLIDʹS EIGHTH THEOREM
      (pp. 26-26)
    • BECAUSE A GARDEN MUST END
      (pp. 27-28)
  7. VAUX-LE-VICOMTE

  8. OTHER GARDENS

  9. THE MEDICIS

  10. VERSAILLES

  11. STATUARY
    (pp. 79-86)
  12. ORANGERIES
    (pp. 87-94)
  13. ʺYOU ARE A HAPPY MAN, LE NÔTREʺ