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The Modern World-System III

The Modern World-System III: The Second Era of Great Expansion of the Capitalist World-Economy, 1730s–1840s

Immanuel Wallerstein
Copyright Date: 2011
Edition: 1
Pages: 390
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1ppb70
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  • Book Info
    The Modern World-System III
    Book Description:

    Immanuel Wallerstein's highly influential, multi-volume opus,The Modern World-System,is one of this century's greatest works of social science. An innovative, panoramic reinterpretation of global history, it traces the emergence and development of the modern world from the sixteenth to the twentieth century.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-94859-4
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xi-xii)
  5. PROLOGUE TO THE 2011 EDITION
    (pp. xiii-xviii)

    There are three controversial questions in my treatment of the period running from 1730 to the 1840s. For many analysts, perhaps the majority, this period represents the great turning point of the modern era, the moment when capitalism as a system, or modernity as a mode of existence, came into being. Readers of the first three volumes will know that I do not agree, since I think the great turning point was in the “long sixteenth century.”

    The second controversial question concerns the concept of “incorporation” into the capitalist world-economy of zones that were previously part of what I have...

  6. 1 INDUSTRY AND BOURGEOISIE
    (pp. 1-54)

    We are accustomed to organizing our knowledge around central concepts which take the form of elementary truisms. The rise of industry and the rise of the bourgeoisie or middle classes are two such concepts, bequeathed to us by nineteenth-century historiography and social science to explain the modern world. The dominant view has been that a qualitative historical change took place at the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth centuries. This was an age of revolutions when both the “first”² industrial revolution in Great Britain and the “exemplary”³ bourgeois revolution in France occurred. No doubt there have...

  7. 2 STRUGGLE IN THE CORE—PHASE III: 1763–1815
    (pp. 55-126)

    The Treaty of Paris in 1763 placed Great Britain in an advantageous position to accomplish what it had been seeking to do for a century already—outdistance France decisively at all levels, economically, politically, and militarily.¹ It was not, however, until 1815 that this task was accomplished, and it was not easy.

    This third and last phase of the continuous and open struggle between the two claimants to hegemony occurred under circumstances of a renewed expansion of the capitalist world-economy, itself the result of the restructuring of this world-economy during the long stagnation of the seventeenth century (which I analyzed...

  8. 3 THE INCORPORATION OF VAST NEW ZONES INTO THE WORLD-ECONOMY: 1750–1850
    (pp. 127-190)

    In the course of the renewed economic expansion (and monetary inflation) of the period 1733–1817 (more or less), the European world-economy broke the bounds it had created in the long sixteenth century and began to incorporate vast new zones into the effective division of labor it encompassed. It began by incorporating zones which had already been in its external arena since the sixteenth century—most particularly and most importantly, the Indian subcontinent, the Ottoman empire, the Russian empire, and West Africa.

    These incorporations took place in the second half of the eighteenth and the first half of the nineteenth...

  9. 4 THE SETTLER DECOLONIZATION OF THE AMERICAS: 1763-1833
    (pp. 191-256)

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, more than half the territory of the Americas was, in juridical terms, composed of colonies of European states, primarily of Great Britain, France, Spain, and Portugal. The remaining territory was outside the interstate system of the capitalist world-economy. By the middle of the nineteenth century, virtually all of these colonies had been transformed into independent sovereign states (after some combinations of and divisions among previous administrative entities). Furthermore, these new states had, by this time, laid claim to jurisdiction over the remaining land area in the hemisphere.

    This was a remarkable reshaping of...

  10. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 257-352)
  11. INDEX
    (pp. 353-372)