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Anglo-Norman Studies 37

Anglo-Norman Studies 37: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2014

Edited by Elisabeth van Houts
Copyright Date: 2015
Edition: NED - New edition
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 307
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt13wzt1t
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  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 37
    Book Description:

    The contributions collected here demonstrate the full range and vitality of current work on the Anglo-Norman period, from a variety of different angles and disciplines. Topics include architecture and material remains in Winchester, Kent and Hampshire; the role of Duke Richard II and Abbot John of Fécamp in early Normandy; political and liturgical culture at the Anglo-Norman and Angevin courts; the lost (illustrated?) prototype of Dudo of Saint-Quentin's early Norman history and Geoffrey of Monmouth's motivation for his Historia Regum Britonum; twelfth-century legal scholarship and the archaic use of vernacular vocabulary in law texts; trade and travel; and a study of episcopal acta from the south-western Norman dioceses. Contributors: Richard Allen, Pierre Bauduin, Johanna Dale, Jennifer Farrell, Peter Fergusson, Sara Harris, Nicholas Karn, Edmund King, Lauren Mancia, Eljas Oksanen, Gesine Oppitz-Trotman, Benjamin Pohl, Katherine Weikert

    eISBN: 978-1-78204-525-0
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND TABLES
    (pp. vii-x)
  4. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. xi-xii)
    Elisabeth van Houts
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
  6. Henry of Winchester: the Bishop, the City, and the Wider World (The R. Allen Brown Memorial Lecture, 2014)
    (pp. 1-24)
    Edmund King

    Henry of Winchester is one of the most recognisable figures of the twelfth century. In the Winchester Bible, which he commissioned, he is found as Pope Desiderius, addressing a slightly sceptical St Jerome. He bears his Bible under his left hand, and over his vestments he wears the pallium which he had long sought (Fig. 1).¹ On the Tournai marble font, in the cathedral, he appears as St Nicholas, the very model of pastoral care, with his beard rather more carefully trimmed (Fig. 2).² On the famous enamel plaques in the British Museum, he appears to be presenting an altar...

  7. EPISCOPAL ACTA IN NORMANDY, 911–1204: THE CHARTERS OF THE BISHOPS OF AVRANCHES, COUTANCES AND SÉES
    (pp. 25-52)
    Richard Allen

    The launch of the British Academy’sEnglish Episcopal Acta (EEA)project in 1973, and the publication of its first volume in 1980, along with the further forty-one that have since come to press, have helped to revolutionize our understanding of the English Church in the High Middle Ages.¹ Whereas previous generations of scholars interested in such documents had been forced to rely upon scattered, outdated and very often difficult-to-access published and unpublished material, those working today can depend upon a body of meticulously edited texts collected together in a single series that, upon its completion, will answer the call famously...

  8. RICHARD II DE NORMANDIE: FIGURE PRINCIÈRE ET TRANSFERTS CULTURELS (FIN DIXIÈME–DÉBUT ONZIÈME SIÈCLE)
    (pp. 53-82)
    Pierre Bauduin

    This paper considers the construction of a model prince in Normandy under Duke Richard II. Its main topic concerns some borrowings that shaped the image of the Norman prince. First, it evokes the different representations of the Normans and of their duke at the end of the tenth and at the beginning of the eleventh centuries. This image, which retains a negative connotation around 1000, notably changed under Richard II with the duke himself contributing to this change by his largesse, especially in favour of churches. The model of a prince is also indebted to the model of a king:...

  9. ROYAL INAUGURATION AND THE LITURGICAL CALENDAR IN ENGLAND, FRANCE, AND THE EMPIRE c. 1050–c. 1250
    (pp. 83-98)
    Johanna Dale

    Rigord included a story in hisGesta Philippi Augusticoncerning the postponement of the young prince’s consecration from 15 August to 1 November 1179.¹ The mysterious tale of the illness Philip developed after becoming lost in the forest of Compiègne, and his father’s visit to the shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury to pray for his safe recovery, has understandably intrigued scholars. Less attention, however, has been paid to the importance of the dates, which are stressed by Rigord himself. Rigord twice mentions that the young king should have been consecrated on the feast of the Assumption of the Virgin,...

  10. HISTORY, PROPHECY AND THE ARTHUR OF THE NORMANS: THE QUESTION OF AUDIENCE AND MOTIVATION BEHIND GEOFFREY OF MONMOUTH’S HISTORIA REGUM BRITANNIAE
    (pp. 99-114)
    Jennifer Farrell

    Speaking at the Battle Conference for Anglo-Norman Studies in 1990, John Gillingham said that ‘it is unlikely there could ever be a single satisfying explanation for a book as extraordinary and influential as Geoffrey of Monmouth’sHistory of the Kings of Britain’.¹ However, this has not prevented scholars attempting to find it, or, at the very least, to offer up some plausible argument which might shed light on both theHistoria Regum Britanniaeand its author. The continued interest in Geoffrey’sHistoriais due largely to the fact that Geoffrey’s inspirations and appeal transcended social and political borders, while the...

  11. CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL PRIORY’S BATH HOUSE AND FISHPOND
    (pp. 115-130)
    Peter Fergusson

    Changes in monasticism in the century following the Norman Conquest may be recognized with the help of two documents. Archbishop Lanfranc’sDecreta,writtenc.1077, make reference on occasion to the buildings which he had newly constructed for the monks at Canterbury.¹ Along with the surviving remains, these references allow for a reconstruction of his ideas on monastic organization at the start of Norman rule. A second document, from the late 1150s, shows the entire precinct with the cathedral church and thirty of its surrounding buildings resulting from the extensive renovations undertaken by Prior Wibert (c.1153–67).² The depiction of...

  12. Tam Anglis quam Danis: ‘Old Norse’ Terminology in the Constitutiones de foresta (The Marjorie Chibnall Memorial Essay, 2014)
    (pp. 131-148)
    Sara Harris

    TheConstitutiones de forestais an anonymous Latin description of forest law which purports to be authentic legislation from the reign of Cnut (1016–35). However, its details have been drawn from the author’s knowledge of twelfth-century forest administration, implicitly depicting forest law as a product of Anglo-Saxon England. The text has been informed by a broader twelfth-century consciousness of the ways in which Old English legal lexis could be employed to situate texts within specific historical circumstances. However, its author formulated a highly unusual response to this trend for the retention of key terms from vernacular legislation. As part...

  13. QUADRIPARTITUS, LEGES HENRICI PRIMI AND THE SCHOLARSHIP OF ENGLISH LAW IN THE EARLY TWELFTH CENTURY
    (pp. 149-160)
    Nicholas Karn

    This paper is based on two sources, theLeges Henrici PrimiandQuadripartitus. They are the two largest and most important sources for English law in the Anglo-Norman era, and are usually regarded as though they were written by the same individual.¹ Nonetheless, they differ greatly in nature and content.Quadripartitus² consists of two parts – the title is attested no earlier than the sixteenth century and is probably misleading³ – one of which is a translation into Latin of a wide range of pre-Conquest legal documents, prefaced by a lament on the condition of England in the reign of...

  14. JOHN OF FÉCAMP AND AFFECTIVE REFORM IN ELEVENTH-CENTURY NORMANDY
    (pp. 161-180)
    Lauren Mancia

    Over the course of the eleventh century, the monastery of Fécamp developed an increasingly unified liturgical, political, and devotional culture. Under the direction of John of Fécamp, abbot of the monastery from 1028 to 1078, the monastery battled for monastic liberties, collected books, reformed ritual practices, acquired relics, and worked to streamline and strengthen the reform programme that had begun at the monastery in 1001 under John’s mentor, William of Volpiano (d. 1031).

    In this paper, I set out to trace one motif of the Fécamp reform programme of the eleventh century, one that appeared in many different media within...

  15. TRADE AND TRAVEL IN ENGLAND DURING THE LONG TWELFTH CENTURY
    (pp. 181-204)
    Eljas Oksanen

    This paper investigates the development of the English commercial landscape of markets, boroughs, and fairs from the late eleventh to the early thirteenth centuries, and sets it against the background of networks of travel and communications that supported it. The great economic and social transformations during this period are well known: among the more notable are the growth of the English population by half,¹ the increase in the number of coins in circulation from an estimated average of six million to sixty million silver pennies or more,² and the foundation of a multitude of new towns across the realm.³ The...

  16. THE EMPEROR’S ROBE: THOMAS BECKET AND ANGEVIN POLITICAL CULTURE
    (pp. 205-220)
    Gesine Oppitz-Trotman

    Traditionally the cult of St Thomas Becket has been associated with opposition to English kings.¹ However, in the period between Henry II’s penance in Canterbury in 1174 and the political renewal of the cult following the 1220 translation overseen by Stephen Langton, the symbolic fortunes of Plantagenet kingship and the cult of St Thomas were entwined. My article explores this relationship from one particular angle: namely, an imperial one. Following Henry II’s accession, Plantagenet political culture had acquired a fresh imperial emphasis. Thomas Becket’s murder in 1170 challenged this emphasis, and called for a sudden reorientation in the crown’s relationship...

  17. THE ILLUSTRATED ARCHETYPE OF THE HISTORIA NORMANNORUM: DID DUDO OF SAINT-QUENTIN WRITE A ‘CHRONICON PICTUM’?
    (pp. 221-252)
    Benjamin Pohl

    Around the turn of the first millennium, Dudo of Saint-Quentin was commissioned to write the first dynastic history of Normandy and its ruling family. His patrons were the Norman rulers residing at Rouen, namely Richard I and his son and successor, Richard II. The proud result of this transgenerational relationship between the ducal family and their first ‘official’ or ‘house historian’ was theHistoria Normannorum (HN), which Dudo presented to the Norman court in or shortly after 1015.¹ Scholars have paid much attention to the intricate textual relationships which governed theHN’s literary composition, successfully scrutinizing its similarities to works...

  18. THE BIOGRAPHY OF A PLACE: FACCOMBE NETHERTON, HAMPSHIRE, c. 900–1200
    (pp. 253-280)
    Katherine Weikert

    A place is not a static thing. The creative and destructive process that a place goes through leaves innumerable marks on it: buildings are created, destroyed, rebuilt. Boundaries are fixed, changed, moved. Landscapes are altered, left to fallow, recreated. A place is a palimpsest, and it is our job to look between the layers and the scraping and the reuse to try to see the meanings of these places.¹

    There are many ways we attempt to do this: excavation, of course, and documentary research, and as often as not in the medieval period a healthy combination of the two. Our...

  19. Back Matter
    (pp. 281-294)