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Anglo-Norman Studies 25

Anglo-Norman Studies 25: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2002

Edited by John Gillingham
Copyright Date: 2003
Edition: NED - New edition
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 252
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt14brvd2
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  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 25
    Book Description:

    The Battle Conference celebrated its quarter-centenary in 2002 in Glasgow, and this volume, while ranging from Norman Sicily to Scandinavia, has a particular focus on Scottish themes. There are six papers on aspects of Scottish history from the eleventh to the early thirteenth century: on kings and their followers, on the building of burghs, and on the border abbey churches. Charters (Norman, Anglo-Norman and Scottish) represent another focus. In addition to papers discussing problems of authenticity and the implications of forgery, several others use charter evidence to shed new light on royal and aristocratic values and on critical periods in the history of William the Conqueror and the Marshal earls. Three papers take a comparative look at past and present interpretations of law and law codes in England, Scotland and Scandinavia; two investigate contemporary historians' perceptions of the Jews and Byzantium.Contributors: MICHAEL ANGOLD, G.W.S. BARROW, DAVID BATES, DAUVIT BROUN, JULIA CRICK, A.A.M. DUNCAN, RICHARD FAWCETT, J0HN HUDSON, MICHAEL H. GELTING, MICHAEL KENNEDY, RICHARD MORTIMER, BRUCE O'BRIEN, DANIEL POWER, NIGEL WEBB.

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-019-7
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. vii-viii)
    John Gillingham
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. ix-xii)
  6. R. Allen Brown Memorial Lecture THE CONQUEROR’S ADOLESCENCE
    (pp. 1-18)
    David Bates

    It is a great honour to be asked to give this lecture and a privilege to be able to do so in my own University. The Battle Conference is now so much an established institution that it is important to remember how radical and exciting Allen Brown’s foundation of the conference was for all of us who were around when the first one was held in 1978. My own first Battle Conference was in 1981 and, although I have not been as regular an attender as I would have liked in the last decade, I have always been present in...

  7. KNOWLEDGE OF BYZANTINE HISTORY IN THE WEST: THE NORMAN HISTORIANS (ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CENTURIES)
    (pp. 19-34)
    Michael Angold

    What Western historians knew about Byzantine history at any given point in the middle ages provides a rough and ready guide to the standing of Byzantium in the West. It is an approach that requires refinement. It will be more effective if the chronological span is reduced in such a way as to cover significant developments in relations between Byzantium and the West. It equally makes sense to take a group of historians, who will reflect the interests of a particular area or people. On this occasion that group is self-selecting. It comes in the shape of the Norman historians...

  8. COMPANIONS OF THE ATHELING
    (pp. 35-46)
    G. W. S. Barrow

    First, a littledramatis personaeand chronology.¹ Edmund Ironside, heroic son of Æthelraed ‘Unraed’, who died in 1016, left two very young sons – possibly twins – who fell into the hands of Cnut. Cnut despatched the boys to his half-brother King Olaf of Sweden, perhaps intending them to be put to death, perhaps hoping they would simply disappear. Olaf’s daughter had married Jaroslav the Great, duke of Novgorod and prince of Kiev, and the boys probably grew up at his court, to which the Christian claimant to the throne of Hungary, Andrew, came as refugee and suppliant in the late 1030s...

  9. THE ABSENCE OF REGNAL YEARS FROM THE DATING CLAUSE OF CHARTERS OF KINGS OF SCOTS, 1195–1222
    (pp. 47-64)
    Dauvit Broun

    The year 1195 witnessed a clutch of curious decisions by William I. Although these were not directly related to each other, they were all concerned in different ways with Scotland’s interaction with England. The most striking decision is relayed to us by Roger of Howden,² who tells us, during his account of events in June 1195, that in this year King William fell ill in the royal ‘vill’ at Clackmannan, and decided that Otto of Brunswick, King Richard I’s nephew, should marry his eldest daughter, Margaret, and succeed him as king of Scots, despite the fact that there was already...

  10. ST ALBANS, WESTMINSTER AND SOME TWELFTH-CENTURY VIEWS OF THE ANGLO-SAXON PAST
    (pp. 65-84)
    Julia Crick

    More than fifty years ago Vivian Galbraith sketched in a single paragraph a scene of frenetic historical industry in the generations after the Norman Conquest.¹

    The heightened curiosity about the Anglo-Saxon past in the early twelfth century, though bound up with the wider intellectual renaissance of the age, had, like all such movements, a local and practical basis. All over Europe princes were hammering into shape well-run states and striving to overcome the intense localism of a still largely customary society.²

    Meanwhile, in England ‘On all sides there was a movement to record the facts in writing, and the Domesday...

  11. THE ARCHITECTURAL CONTEXT OF THE BORDER ABBEY CHURCHES IN THE TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES
    (pp. 85-106)
    Richard Fawcett

    The grouping of major monastic houses along Scotland’s border with England must always have been one of the most impressive concentrations of medieval church architecture to be found anywhere in Britain, and several of them have retained highly imposing structural remains. The Augustinian abbey at Jedburgh has preserved the shell of its church, and the plan of its conventual buildings has been recovered and laid out following excavation.¹ At Dryburgh the Premonstratensian abbey in a loop of the Tweed survives as an outstandingly beautiful, if fragmentary, ruin. Of Kelso’s Tironensian abbey the chief remains are the greater part of its...

  12. PREDATORY KINSHIP REVISITED
    (pp. 107-120)
    Michael H. Gelting

    If I have chosen the title of my paper to refer to Eleanor Searle’s bookPredatory Kinship and the Creation of Norman Power,¹ it is not that I believe that work to reflect current consensus on Norman society in the tenth and eleventh centuries.² Searle’s book is replete with interesting observations on the functioning of kinship as a political instrument during those centuries, but she ultimately fails in her attempt to demonstrate that the Normans were in this respect somehow different from their – supposedly more ‘feudal’ – Frankish neighbours.³ What interests me here is the basic assumption at the root of...

  13. LEGAL ASPECTS OF SCOTTISH CHARTER DIPLOMATIC IN THE TWELFTH CENTURY: A COMPARATIVE APPROACH
    (pp. 121-138)
    John Hudson

    Just over a century ago, F. W. Maitland was in correspondence with George Neilson, and at various points expressed his growing interest in the medieval development of Scots Law. He stated that ‘I have long had the dream that Scotland is the link between England and Normandy’, and ‘If I had another life I would spend much of it among your Scotch documents, and this for the sake of England.’¹ A comparative study of English and Scottish legal development in the middle ages remains highly desirable, and not merely for the sake of England. The present paper is very much...

  14. ‘FAITH IN THE ONE GOD FLOWED OVER YOU FROM THE JEWS, THE SONS OF THE PATRIARCHS AND THE PROPHETS’: WILLIAM OF NEWBURGH’S WRITINGS ON ANTI-JEWISH VIOLENCE
    (pp. 139-152)
    M. J. Kennedy

    William of Newburgh, a canon of the Augustinian house there, some fifteen miles north-east of York, wrote in the 1190s at the end of the most fruitful and creative century of historical writing in medieval England, and hisHistoria Rerum Anglicarum(History of English Affairs) has attracted high praise over the last century and more. Howlett, his editor in the Rolls Series, described him in what now read as very ‘Victorian’ terms as ‘a man of unusual moral elevation’ who recorded events with ‘unswerving faithfulness’.² Kate Norgate, author of his entry in theDictionary of National Biography, ascribed to him...

  15. ANGLO-NORMAN LAY CHARTERS, 1066–c. 1100: A DIPLOMATIC APPROACH
    (pp. 153-176)
    Richard Mortimer

    Documents purporting to be those of Anglo-Norman lay men and women have survived in quite substantial numbers from before 1100. For lay estates they are often the only source that can be used alongside Domesday Book, and for the religious institutions which are the beneficiaries they are often the foundation charter or the earliest record of endowment. But interpreting them poses serious problems. They are often suspected of being forgeries. The eleventh century was a period of very decentralised document production everywhere in northern Europe: ‘each establishment created its own tradition’, leading inevitably to a great variety of diplomatic practice.¹...

  16. THE INSTITUTA CNUTI AND THE TRANSLATION OF ENGLISH LAW
    (pp. 177-198)
    Bruce O’Brien

    In 1893, the same year that he published his slim edition of theConsiliatio Cnuti, Felix Liebermann turned his attention, in a paper published by the Royal Historical Society, to another overlooked Latin translation of Old English law. The object of his interest was one of the three Latin translations of Old English legal texts made after 1066. It went under many titles – Liebermann proposed replacing these with his own, drawn in part from two of the earliest witnesses, but crafted to reflect better, he thought, the actual contents of the translation: theInstituta Cnuti aliorumque regum Anglorum.¹ And so...

  17. THE FRENCH INTERESTS OF THE MARSHAL EARLS OF STRIGUIL AND PEMBROKE, 1189–1234
    (pp. 199-226)
    Daniel Power

    The so-called ‘end of the Anglo-Norman realm’ in 1204 is a pivotal moment in the history of England and France.² At first glance it appears to bring the Anglo-Norman chapter in the history of the two countries to a complete close: although the kings of England and their counsellors long nourished hopes that ‘England and Normandy would be one’, most of the aristocracy soon had to abandon their possessions on one or other side of the Channel. Yet although the broad outlines of this disengagement are well known, its details are still relatively unexplored – in marked contrast with the establishment...

  18. SETTLEMENT AND INTEGRATION: THE ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ARISTOCRACY IN SCOTLAND (1124–1214)
    (pp. 227-238)
    Nigel M. Webb

    This paper arose out of an attempt to study in detail the development of local aristocratic society in twelfth-century Scotland. The themes to be advanced below will develop the current body of Scottish historiography and will present a picture of society characterised by the fragmentation of settlement into small local groups. At the same time these groups all remained part of the larger regional society. Analysis will take the form of a regional study and will be principally focused upon the relatively well documented county of Roxburghshire. The observations made by Professor Barrow regarding the majority of minor landholders established...

  19. Back Matter
    (pp. 239-239)