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Fourteenth Century England IV

Fourteenth Century England IV

Edited by J. S. Hamilton
Copyright Date: 2006
Edition: NED - New edition
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 204
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt163t9wb
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  • Book Info
    Fourteenth Century England IV
    Book Description:

    The new research here covers a number of aspects of the politics and culture of fourteenth-century England, including religious culture and institutions as illustrated in the cult of Thomas of Lancaster, preaching to women in the later fourteenth century, and in the Church's response to a royal fundraising campaign. There are detailed examinations of prominent and less prominent individuals - Bishop Thomas Hatfield, Agnes Maltravers, and Lord Thomas Despenser - together with investigations of broader policy issues, particularly the dispensation of justice in the reign of Richard II. Finally, the intersection of environmental, political, and economic issues is approached from two very different perspectives, the development of royal landscapes and of the late medieval coal industry. Contributors: JOHN T. MCQUILLEN, AMANDA RICHARDSON, A. K. MCHARDY, CHRISTIAN D. LIDDY, J.S. BOTHWELL, BETH ALLISON BARR, DIANE MARTIN, HELEN LACEY, JOHN LELAND, MARTYN LAWRENCE, ULRIKE GRASSNICK, MARK ARVANIGIAN J.S. HAMILTON is Professor and Chair of History at Baylor University.

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-466-9
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. List of Illustrations
    (pp. vi-vii)
  4. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. viii-viii)
  5. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xi-xii)
  7. WHO WAS ST THOMAS OF LANCASTER? NEW MANUSCRIPT EVIDENCE
    (pp. 1-25)
    John T. McQuillen

    Medieval England was rife with national and local, official and unofficial cultic centers, drawing pilgrims up, down, and across the country. ‘From every shires ende/ Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende’, as well as to Durham, Oxford, Walsingham, Evesham, and a multitude of towns and villages in between. Medieval Christianity cleaved to a strong belief in the curative power of relics and places and the simple efficacy of the pilgrimage act. Every church and cathedral housed a relic of some saint or holy person, and claims of miracle cures wrought by the saint via their relic lured the pilgrims with...

  8. ‘HEDGING, DITCHING AND OTHER IMPROPER OCCUPATIONS’: ROYAL LANDSCAPES AND THEIR MEANING UNDER EDWARD II AND EDWARD III
    (pp. 26-42)
    Amanda Richardson

    The above order, issued from Windsor by Edward II in November 1317, lies behind the writing of this paper. Almost a throwaway reference that has hitherto been overlooked by scholars of Clarendon Palace and its park, the mandate might be considered at best noteworthy (and at worst insignificant) by late-medieval landscape historians. Yet at a local level its unambiguity, verified by other documentary sources,² reveals that while Clarendon Park in Wiltshire is undeniably ancient, its size did not remain constant throughout the late medieval period. The deer park, which is among the best-preserved medieval royal hunting spaces in the country,...

  9. PAYING FOR THE WEDDING: EDWARD III AS FUNDRAISER, 1332–3
    (pp. 43-60)
    A. K. McHardy

    In 1331, at the tournament organised by his friend William de Montacute in Cheapside, London, the king’s sister Eleanor was accorded a prominent place in the associated procession, where her beauty made a strong impression. There was a sound practical reason for this: Eleanor was on the marriage market. Eleanor was the elder of the king’s two sisters and her marriage had been of diplomatic importance for a number of years. In 1325, when she was seven, her father had tried to arrange her wedding to Alfonso V of Castile. In 1329 she was proposed as bride of the future...

  10. THE POLITICS OF PRIVILEGE: THOMAS HATFIELD AND THE PALATINATE OF DURHAM, 1345–81
    (pp. 61-79)
    Christian D. Liddy

    On 22 September 1375 Pope Gregory XI granted the newly appointed archbishop of York, Alexander Neville, special permission to conduct a visitation of the city and diocese of Durham and to impose the ‘usual procurations’ (the hospitality traditionally received by a bishop in the course of his visitation from the churches visited), without first completing the visitation of his own city and diocese of York, as was prescribed by canon law.² The tensions arising from Durham’s subordinate position as a suffragan see of the diocese of York had frequently crystallized on the issue of the right of visitation, which York...

  11. AGNES MALTRAVERS (d. 1375) AND HER HUSBAND, JOHN (d. 1364): REBEL WIVES, SEPARATE LIVES, AND CONJUGAL VISITS IN LATER MEDIEVAL ENGLAND
    (pp. 80-92)
    J. S. Bothwell

    When Agnes Maltravers died in the summer of 1375, she was one of wealthiest women of the lesser peerage. Holder of dower and jointure lands from three husbands, and an heiress in her own right, upon her death Agnes controlled at least twenty-eight manors spread throughout East Anglia, the Welsh Marches and the south-west. Her personal possessions at the time of the writing of her will were equally impressive: among other bequests, she was able to distribute valuable forget-me-nots to relatives and friends, including her ‘great cup’, one dragenall, six plates, six pottengers, six saucers, and two pitchers, all made...

  12. GENDERING PASTORAL CARE: JOHN MIRK AND HIS INSTRUCTIONS FOR PARISH PRIESTS
    (pp. 93-108)
    Beth Allison Barr

    William Pantin made this observation in his 1955 survey of the fourteenth-century English church.¹ In short, he had recognized a critical point: that – despite the inadequacies of the Avignon Papacy, the chaos of the Great Schism, and the heresy of John Wycliff – the church reforms of the thirteenth century had not been in vain. They had provided the impetus for the didactic pastoral manuals of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. By including such basic tenets as the Ten Commandments, Articles of Faith, Works of Mercy, Seven Vices and Virtues, and Seven Sacraments, these texts fulfilled the spirit of...

  13. PROSECUTION OF THE STATUTES OF PROVISORS AND PREMUNIRE IN THE KING’S BENCH, 1377–1394
    (pp. 109-123)
    Diane Martin

    In the early 1380s William Southam broke the windows, door and gate of Napton church in Warwickshire and assaulted the rector, Richard Tylhe, in order to disinter the body of Joan Radele who was buried within.¹ Joan, a parishioner of Napton, had been laid to rest only twelve days before William exhumed her body, carried it outside the church, despoiled it, and then stole it. Why William sought such a gruesome revenge on Joan is unfortunately not known. This story is, nevertheless, recorded in the plea rolls of the king’s bench during the reign of Richard II as a prosecution...

  14. ‘MERCY AND TRUTH PRESERVE THE KING’: RICHARD II’S USE OF THE ROYAL PARDON IN 1397 AND 1398
    (pp. 124-135)
    Helen Lacey

    Richard II convened his so-called ‘Revenge Parliament’ on 17 September 1397, with the intention of imposing a new personal agenda on the polity of the realm.² Two months earlier the king had ordered the arrest of his longstanding political opponents, the Lords Appellant, and the autumn parliament provided the forum for their public trial and conviction. Furthermore, he extorted concessions from the Lords and Commons which effectively curtailed the powers of parliament.³ For the chronicler Thomas Walsingham these events were the herald of a new and tyrannical phase of Richard’s reign, and historians have generated a considerable body of scholarship...

  15. ALIENS IN THE PARDONS OF RICHARD II
    (pp. 136-145)
    John L. Leland

    R. R. Davies, in his 1994 presidential address to the Royal History Society, began by saying that ‘Peoples are back on the historian’s agenda’.¹ In his 1996 address, however, he went on to say that ‘a people … is a most evanescent and elusive concept; it lacks fixed form and geographical definition. This is precisely where law could be helpful: it helped establish the identity of a people in its own eyes and those of others.’² Davies here was thinking primarily of the claim of a people to possess a unique body of law and custom as an identifying characteristic,...

  16. ‘TOO FLATTERING SWEET TO BE SUBSTANTIAL’? THE LAST MONTHS OF THOMAS, LORD DESPENSER
    (pp. 146-158)
    Martyn Lawrence

    ‘Murder, like talent, seems occasionally to run in families.’¹ The nineteenth-century British philosopher George Henry Lewes could almost have been writing of the Despenser family, for whombeingmurdered – or, at least, failing to die warm in their beds – was an alarming family tendency. In six generations, no fewer than three of the Despensers were executed brutally, another was slaughtered at the battle of Evesham (1265), and the remaining two are believed to have fallen victim to plague. Of these six generations, easily the most politically significant deaths were those of Hugh Despenser the younger, who was hanged,...

  17. ‘O PRINCE, DESYRE TO BE HONOURABLE’: THE DEPOSITION OF RICHARD II AND MIRRORS FOR PRINCES
    (pp. 159-174)
    Ulrike Graßnick

    The year 1399 was troublesome for many in England, for the unfortunate Richard II as well as for other members within the political field, including Thomas, Lord Berkeley:¹

    What should he, Berkeley, do? To which side did honour and justice direct him? In his soul-searching dilemma his Lordship turned to his ageing chaplain and confessor.

    Trevisa was not surprised that his patron should seek his advice. Had they not often during the last ten years, and more especially in the last two, discussed theoretical situations somewhat similar to the present one, with always the ultimate question, “Is it ever morally...

  18. REGIONAL POLITICS, LANDED SOCIETY AND THE COAL INDUSTRY IN NORTH-EAST ENGLAND, 1350–1430
    (pp. 175-192)
    Mark Arvanigian

    Over the years, historians of the late-medieval English gentry have mapped out several working models to explain the character and behavior of landed society in various localities around the country. While various, two basic models have nonetheless emerged which have served to define the parameters of the debate. On the one hand, some have argued that gentry life was usually dominated by the presence and operation of great aristocratic affinities, which often became stages for the drama of competition between gentry families, and which thereby preoccupied gentry families; they were often left scrambling for fortune and preferment within one or...

  19. Back Matter
    (pp. 193-193)