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The Fifteenth Century XI

The Fifteenth Century XI: Concerns and Preoccupations

Edited by LINDA CLARK
Volume: 11
Copyright Date: 2012
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 176
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt1x73jg
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  • Book Info
    The Fifteenth Century XI
    Book Description:

    The concerns of people over differing levels of fifteenth-century society are the focus of the essays contained in this volume. How would a queen in exile wish to be depicted on a medal, or a newly-crowned king deal with recalcitrant London merchants when their interests clashed with his policies? The logistics of an invasion of France present a challenge to the military advisers of another king, and by bringing fresh insights to the text a translator of Vegetius' 'De re militari' addresses the fears of rulers and ruled in a time of civil unrest. English supplicants to the papal curia require expert advice to navigate bureaucratic procedures at Rome; while Welsh students encounter other obstacles as they embark on careers in Church and state. Manuscript and printed versions of parliamentary statutes point to differing preferences on the part of government clerks and practising lawyers in their choice of language; while the papers of a professional estate manager from Norfolk reveal antiquarian interests and an affinity with William of Worcester. Contributors: Christopher Allmand, Peter Clarke, Rhun Emlyn, Samantha Harper, Frederick Hepburn, John Milner, Dean Rowland, Anthony Smith.

    eISBN: 978-1-78204-019-4
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. vi-vii)
  4. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. viii-viii)
  5. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-xii)
  6. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  7. THE ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS OF VEGETIUS’ DE RE MILITARI. WHAT WERE THEIR AUTHORS’ INTENTIONS?
    (pp. 1-8)
    Christopher Allmand

    Many will be familiar with the De re militari of Vegetius, probably written very late in the fourth century, which served as a kind of military ‘bible’ or authority for men in the Middle Ages. The survival today of more than 200 medieval manuscripts of the complete or nearly complete text, not to mention collections of excerpts which met the demands of preachers and compilers of encyclopaedic works (such as Vincent of Beauvais), suggests how widespread the appreciation of Vegetius’ ideas was in the Middle Ages.

    There came a time, in the second half of the thirteenth century, when the...

  8. THE ENGLISH COMMITMENT TO THE 1412 EXPEDITION TO FRANCE
    (pp. 9-24)
    John Milner

    On 10 March 1415, Henry V commanded the mayor, aldermen and ‘certain of the more substantial commoners’ of London to come to the Tower where he explained to them his plans for the invasion of France. On 14 March a delegation comprising the archbishop of Canterbury, the bishop of Winchester and the dukes of Bedford, Gloucester and York went to meet the city fathers so that ‘they might more willingly contribute money to the campaign’.¹ This element of careful advance planning had been missing in the summer of 1412. Through the oath of their ambassadors on 18 May 1412 to...

  9. SERVING CHURCH AND STATE: THE CAREERS OF MEDIEVAL WELSH STUDENTS
    (pp. 25-40)
    Rhun Emlyn

    Reading the chronicle of Adam Usk one could get the distinct impression that being Welsh proved to be a great disadvantage to ecclesiastical promotion in the later Middle Ages, especially during and after the Glyndŵr rebellion in the first decades of the fifteenth century. In failing to be promoted to a bishopric Adam complains of the ‘violent and vociferous objections’ made against him and the ‘envy of the English’ which led to disastrous consequences: ‘I was humiliated, and spent the next four years undergoing dreadful hardships, condemned to suffer like an exile by land and sea, stripped of all my...

  10. PETITIONING THE POPE: ENGLISH SUPPLICANTS AND ROME IN THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY
    (pp. 41-60)
    Peter D. Clarke

    Petitions to the papal curia have long been recognised as a valuable source for the religious, social and political history of later medieval Europe. They requested a wide variety of papal favours, ranging from marriage dispensations to provisions for benefices. They are important, firstly, for what they reveal about relations between the papacy and different parts of Europe. As far as England is concerned, J.A.F. Thomson argued that they epitomised a view of the late medieval papacy as chiefly a source of spiritual favours, what Sir John Paston called ‘the welle of grace’.¹ Indeed most of these favours were a...

  11. THE QUEEN IN EXILE: REPRESENTING MARGARET OF ANJOU IN ART AND LITERATURE
    (pp. 61-90)
    Frederick Hepburn

    The battle of Towton, fought in a blizzard on Palm Sunday, 29 March 1461, with massive loss of life among the combatants, effectively brought an end to the long and increasingly troubled reign of Henry VI. With the decisive defeat of the Lancastrian army, the crown of England was now firmly in the hands of the Yorkist contender, the newly-acclaimed Edward IV. The story is well known of how, in the aftermath of the battle, King Henry, together with his wife Margaret of Anjou and their seven-year-old son Edward, fled for refuge to the Scottish court; of how, in the...

  12. THE PRESENCE OF THE PAST: THE BOKKYNGS OF LONGHAM IN THE LATER MIDDLE AGES
    (pp. 91-106)
    Anthony Smith

    Longham is situated in the middle of north Norfolk, about four miles north-west of Dereham. It was the home of the Bokkyngs, a modest gentry family, from the late fourteenth century until the early sixteenth century. The focus of this paper is one member of the family, Nicholas Bokkyng, particularly his perception and use of the past, both the recent and the historical past. But to introduce this theme, I shall first briefly review the family’s earlier history and Nicholas Bokkyng’s own career.

    The history of the Bokkyngs before their arrival at Longham is obscure. Their fortunes were established by...

  13. THE END OF THE STATUTE ROLLS: MANUSCRIPT, PRINT AND LANGUAGE CHANGE IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH STATUTES
    (pp. 107-126)
    Dean Rowland

    Historians have long been aware of the deficiencies of the printed text of the folio edition of the Statutes of the Realm covering the statutes prior to the 1350s, and of the need to explore sources beyond the statute roll when considering early legislation.¹ In their paper on these statutes, H.G. Richardson and G.O. Sayles encouraged the production of a new scholarly edition, while at the same time seeking to explain why the picture was so confused.² Specifically, they demonstrated how the first collections of statutes were put together for utilitarian reasons by courts, royal administrators and lawyers from whatever...

  14. DIVIDE AND RULE? HENRY VII, THE MERCERS, MERCHANT TAYLORS AND THE CORPORATION OF LONDON
    (pp. 127-140)
    S.P. Harper

    ‘The closing years of the reign of Henry VII were marked by a series of incidents which, to Londoners at any rate, bore the impress of tyranny.’ So Helen Miller wrote in her 1962 article ‘London and Parliament in the Reign of Henry VIII’.¹ The example Miller used to substantiate her argument was that of the squabble between the crown and the city that followed the award by Henry VII to the Tailors’ Company of a letter patent which, among other things, allowed them to style themselves ‘Merchant Taylors’. This patent was to prove so unpopular with the citizens of...

  15. INDEX
    (pp. 141-149)
  16. Back Matter
    (pp. 150-158)