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Anglo-Norman Studies 35

Anglo-Norman Studies 35: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2012

Edited by David Bates
Volume: 35
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 400
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt31nhmm
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  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 35
    Book Description:

    This volume of 'Anglo-Norman Studies' demonstrates yet again the multi-disciplinarity and European range of the series. As befits the proceedings of a conference held in Normandy at Bayeux, it contains two articles on the renowned Tapestry, and a consideration of the campaign of 1066; there are also several papers on the medieval duchy, their topics including its early tenth-century origins, the abbesses of Norman nunneries, abbatial investitures in the context of religious reform, the reign of Robert Curthose, the charters of a major aristocratic family, and historical writing in and around late twelfth- and early thirteenth-century Normandy. Alongside these are articles on landscape and belief, villein manumissions and the theology of the incarnation, the evolution of criminal law in Scotland, Bohemond of Antioch, the architectural historian John Bilson, and important aspects of twelfth-century poetry. David Bates is a Professorial Fellow at the University of East Anglia and was until recently a Visiting Professor at the University of Caen Basse-Normandie. Contributors: Lesley Abrams, Bernard S. Bachrach, Steven Biddlecombe, Alexandrina Buchanan, Howard B. Clarke, Edoardo D'Angelo, Gregory Fedorenko, Jean-Hervé Foulon, George Garnett, Véronique Gazeau, Paul R. Hyams, Sylvette Lemagnen, Monika Otter, Daniel Power, Alice Taylor, C. S. Watkins.

    eISBN: 978-1-78204-108-5
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND TABLES
    (pp. ix-xii)
  4. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. xiii-xv)
    DAVID BATES
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xvi-xx)
  6. A THREE-CORNERED DYNAMIC OF REDEMPTION IN THE ‘LONG’ THIRTEENTH CENTURY: VILLEIN MANUMISSIONS AND THE THEOLOGY OF THE INCARNATION (The R. Allen Brown Memorial Lecture, 2011)
    (pp. 1-16)
    Paul R. Hyams

    This article investigates the three-cornered transaction by which a merciful God contrived to defeat and destroy the power of Satan over humankind by permitting the Incarnation of His Son as a human but sinless being who could then offer himself up to suffer an unmerited crucifixion. It examines, in particular, an unexpected parallelism between this and the three-sided dynamic of villein manumissions in the English countryside of the ‘long’ thirteenth century. I am, as I fear I shall show below, no theologian. I noticed the analogies between the two processes very much by chance in the course of studying villeinage...

  7. FEMMES EN RELIGION, PERSONNES D’AUTORITÉ: LES ABBESSES NORMANDES (XIe–XIIIe SIÈCLES) (The R. Allen Brown Memorial Lecture, 2012)
    (pp. 17-34)
    Véronique Gazeau

    It was with great pleasure and pride that I accepted David Bates’s kind invitation to give the annual Allen Brown Memorial Lecture on this, the thirty-fifth anniversary of the foundation of the Battle Conference on Anglo-Norman Studies. I remember the first time I was invited by Allen to Battle in 1983. It was at Pyke House, and it was my first time giving a paper at a British conference. When I arrived, I was taken on to the battlefield, and Allen gave me a helmet and a mail coat that I had to put on as if I was a...

  8. THE ROLE OF THE CURATOR OF THE BAYEUX TAPESTRY
    (pp. 35-44)
    Sylvette Lemagnen

    When, during one of his visits to Bayeux, David Bates asked me to speak at this conference about my work, I must admit, I was slightly dubious. What could I reveal to catch your attention? Does the role of Curator take on a particular slant when the exhibit is a world-renowned masterpiece? David was convinced that I could shed some light on aspects of my role that intrigue you and which would be of great interest to the readers ofAnglo-Norman Studies, and so I looked back at my twenty-three years in post in Bayeux.¹

    I was appointed Head of...

  9. EARLY NORMANDY
    (pp. 45-64)
    Lesley Abrams

    The year 2011 witnessed two 1,100th-anniversary celebrations relevant to the activities of Scandinavians overseas. On 2 September 911 a treaty designed to facilitate trade and promote good relations between the Byzantines and the Kievan Rus was agreed in Constantinople.¹ The treaty between the Frankish king Charles the Simple and the viking army led by Rollo that marked the beginning of Normandy is almost virtual in comparison, in the absence of a text or a contemporary record; but, according to Dudo of Saint-Quentin, it too was granted in 911, at Saint-Clairsur-Epte.² The exact nature of the power of the vikings on...

  10. THE NORMAN CONQUEST, COUNTESS ADELA, AND ABBOT BAUDRI
    (pp. 65-78)
    Bernard S. Bachrach

    Much is still controversial regarding the Norman conquest of England.¹ Among important contested matters are the respective sizes of the forces deployed by Duke William and King Harold at Hastings.² The traditional view that William’s army numbered in the 7,000 range rests on neither a contemporary nor a later source, and in my opinion it is untenable.³ By contrast, theChronicle of Saint-Maixentprovides a figure in the neighbourhood of 14,000 men for William’s total force.⁴ This is the only figure in any source that is not absurdly large.⁵ More importantly, theChroniclewas patronized by the court of Viscount...

  11. BALDRIC OF BOURGUEIL AND THE FLAWED HERO
    (pp. 79-94)
    Steven Biddlecombe

    It is rare for us to have a critique of a medieval text by a number of contemporary authors, and even more uncommon for it to be roundly panned. But this is what happened to theGesta Francorum,a history of the First Crusade written by an anonymous witness to those events.¹ Guibert of Nogent said it was ‘pieced together in words more simple than was appropriate’,² while Robert the Monk called it ‘uncertain and unsophisticated in its style and expression’.³ These critical appraisals were written in northern France less than ten years after the composition of the Gesta and...

  12. JOHN BILSON (1856–1943) AND THE STUDY OF ANGLO-NORMAN ROMANESQUE
    (pp. 95-118)
    Alexandrina Buchanan

    On 24 June 1908 John Bilson, a minor architect from Hull, visited Bayeux. After lunch at the Hôtel du Luxembourg, reported as ‘good, 3 fr’,¹ he went to the cathedral. As was his wont, he recorded his visit with detailed notes and sketches. But instead of glorying in the Gothic beauties of the choir, or puzzling over the chronology of the nave, he focused his attention on the crypt and, in particular, on the ground floor chamber in the north-west tower (Figure 1). His peculiar interest is confirmed by a return visit two years later, again carefully recorded in his...

  13. THE IDENTITY OF THE DESIGNER OF THE BAYEUX TAPESTRY
    (pp. 119-140)
    Howard B. Clarke

    ‘Everything ultimately revolves around the nameless figure of the artist in charge.’¹ How right this sentiment is, apart from the fact that he (or she) need not remain nameless! By its nature the Bayeux Tapestry is a work of art that is partly visual and partly narrative and that contains numerous political statements and implicit social commentary. If we could identify the person who was primarily responsible for so much invaluable historical material, questions of an interpretative nature could more easily and more accurately be answered. And if serious study of the artefact goes back to Dom Bernard de Montfaucon’s...

  14. THE PSEUDO-HUGH FALCANDUS IN HIS OWN TEXTS
    (pp. 141-162)
    Edoardo D’Angelo

    Despite the thousands of pages written on the subject by scholars over the last two centuries, the identity of the author of theLiber de regno SicilieandEpistola ad Petrum Panormitane Ecclesie thesaurarium¹ remains a mystery. Here I refrain from summarizing the full history of work on the subject, referring readers to the works of Jamison, Fuiano, da De Lellis, Loud, and Hood.² Having presented the main points of the problem, beginning with the limited data available, I am going to attempt to shed light on this intricate topic.

    As no author is named in the manuscripts, the name...

  15. THE THIRTEENTH-CENTURY CHRONIQUE DE NORMANDIE
    (pp. 163-180)
    Gregory Fedorenko

    On 2 July 1875 a meeting took place of the administrative committee of the Société de l’Histoire de Normandie, chaired by the famous historian, philologist, and librarian Léopold Delisle. In a wide-ranging opening address, Delisle began by thanking his listeners for their scholarly studies of Norman history at a time when, in the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian War, ‘the misfortunes of the fatherland have made the memories of an often glorious, ever-interesting past even dearer to us’.¹ After a survey of the chief Latin narrative sources for the history of medieval Normandy prior to its annexation by the French monarchy...

  16. LES INVESTITURES ABBATIALES EN NORMANDIE: QUELQUES RÉFLEXIONS AUTOUR DU CAS DE L’ABBAYE DU BEC-HELLOUIN (1034–1136)
    (pp. 181-212)
    Jean-Hervé Foulon

    This article analyses and eventually rejects the existing orthodoxy that there was a precocious reform of abbatial investitures in Normandy in the eleventh century that anticipated changes elsewhere. It focuses specifically on evidence from the abbey of Le Bec and analyses in detail the content and construction of the text known as theDe Libertate Beccensis monasterii, written betweenc.1136 and 1140. It then locates its evidence within the context of the considerable liturgical evidence for practice within Normandy and neighbouring regions and proceeds to demonstrate that theDe Libertatewas both anachronistic in its presentation and designed to...

  17. ROBERT CURTHOSE: THE DUKE WHO LOST HIS TROUSERS
    (pp. 213-244)
    George Garnett

    Robert Curthose has been the subject of much recent reassessment.¹ Some of it has questioned how shambolic his reign as duke really was.² The purpose of this essay is different, and narrower: to analyse the most detailed, definitive treatment of the reign, in Orderic Vitalis’sHistoria Ecclesiastica. I shall not, therefore, attempt to judge how accurate Orderic’s account might have been, but I shall conclude by showing that it was not entirely divorced from reality. Indeed, it was partially grounded in, or at least made congruent with, the official treatment of the reign propounded on behalf of King Henry I...

  18. SUFFICIENTIA: A HORATIAN TOPOS AND THE BOUNDARIES OF THE SELF IN THREE TWELFTH-CENTURY POEMS
    (pp. 245-258)
    Monika Otter

    The title of this essay is furnished by one of Baudri of Bourgueil’s autobiographical poems, ‘De sufficientia votorum suorum’. We shall return to the title’s rich polysemy in due course. What it refers to, in the first place, is a topos borrowed from Horace: the modest wealth and the snug self-sufficiency of the rural poet–landowner, who displays his agrarian and rhetorical bounty in copious lists and descriptions. Baudri is not alone in imitating this topos.¹ Of the three poems under consideration here, Hildebert of Lavardin’s ‘De casu huius mundi’ would seem to be the linchpin.² It apparently made an...

  19. ARISTOCRATIC ACTA IN NORMANDY AND ENGLAND, c. 1150–c. 1250: THE CHARTERS AND LETTERS OF THE DU HOMMET CONSTABLES OF NORMANDY
    (pp. 259-286)
    Daniel Power

    With these melodramatic words, published in 1912, a purported descendant of the constables of Normandy bemoaned the decline of his dynasty since the Middle Ages. Their author, Baron Théophile-Paul du Hommet, may have had only a spurious claim to be an offshoot of one of the most prominent families in Angevin and early Capetian Normandy. He was certainly justified, though, in his statement that ‘Few lords have left so many marks of generosity in the archives of our Norman abbeys as William du Hommet.’² This assessment of the abundance of William I du Hommet’s charters for Norman abbeys could be...

  20. CRIME WITHOUT PUNISHMENT: MEDIEVAL SCOTTISH LAW IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
    (pp. 287-304)
    Alice Taylor

    The origins and early history of the category of crime in Scotland have been identified in the increasing strength of royal justice from the reign of David I (1124–53) and the widening in the remit of royal legislation during the reigns of William the Lion (1165–1214) and Alexander II (1214–49).¹ From the reign of David I, the jurisdiction of some major monastic institutions, founded either by David or his successors, was made explicitly subordinate to royal justice: if an abbot failed to do justice in his own court, the king would do it in his stead. During...

  21. LANDSCAPE AND BELIEF IN ANGLO-NORMAN ENGLAND
    (pp. 305-320)
    C. S. Watkins

    Mention of the word ‘landscape’ floods the mind’s eye with images of the picturesque, with recollections of canvases evoking the natural sublime or bucolic country scenes. And appropriately so: the term ‘landscape’ derives from art. Coined in Dutch and used to talk about painting, it reached England in the seventeenth century and became a means to think about space.¹ It is, then, a concept that was not readily available to medieval men and women. There were, for example, no obvious cognates for the term in the lexicons of medieval Latin writers, though a number of chroniclers, such as Henry of...

  22. Back Matter
    (pp. 321-333)