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The Old English Martyrology

The Old English Martyrology: Edition, Translation and Commentary

Edited with a translation by CHRISTINE RAUER
Volume: 10
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 416
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt31njnj
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  • Book Info
    The Old English Martyrology
    Book Description:

    The 'Old English Martyrology' is one of the longest and most important prose texts written in Anglo-Saxon England; it also represents one of the most impressive examples of encyclopaedic writing from the European Middle Ages. Probably intended as a reference work, it was used and transmitted for over 200 years, providing its readers with information on native and foreign saints, time measurement, the seasons of the year, biblical events, and cosmology. Its lively and engaging vignettes illustrate the importance of miracle stories for the early medieval cult of saints. This new edition presents a revised text, with a facing-page, newly-prepared English translation; they are accompanied by a commentary based on a fresh comparison with some 250 Latin and Old English texts, the first published glossary for this text, and extensive bibliographical information and indices. Dr Christine Rauer is a Senior Lecturer in the School of English and the Institute of Mediaeval Studies at the University of St Andrews, Scotland.

    eISBN: 978-1-78204-157-3
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. Acknowledgements
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. Abbreviations
    (pp. ix-xi)
  5. Introduction
    (pp. 1-31)

    The Old English Martyrology is one of the longest and most important prose texts written in Anglo-Saxon England; it also represents one of the most impressive examples of encyclopaedic writing from the European Middle Ages. Probably intended as a reference work, it experienced more than 200 years of transmission and usage. Its principal aim must have been to educate Anglo-Saxon readers in their cults of native and foreign saints, but it also presents detailed information on time measurement, the seasons of the year, biblical events, and cosmology. Its range is impressive even by modern standards: the text makes reference to...

  6. Sigla
    (pp. 32-32)
  7. Text and Translation
    (pp. 34-227)
  8. Commentary
    (pp. 228-310)

    Each of the entries below comments on a particular text section, and consists of three parts. The first aims to summarise the sources of each section and comment on the presumed composition; the second provides notes on specific passages and points of difficulty; the third gives a summary bibliography. Within the bibliography, items are ordered according to the extent to which they comment on the entire text section: more wide-ranging items are listed first, and are followed by items commenting on more detailed aspects. The term ‘source’ is used to refer to texts which the martyrologist could have accessed directly...

  9. Appendix 1: Manuscript A, London, British Library, Add. 23211, fol. 2
    (pp. 311-313)
  10. Appendix 2: Manuscript E, London, British Library, Add. 40165 A.2, fols 6–7
    (pp. 314-318)
  11. Appendix 3: Manuscript F, London, British Library, Harley 3271, fol. 92v
    (pp. 319-320)
  12. Glossary
    (pp. 321-361)
  13. Bibliography
    (pp. 362-386)
  14. Index of Persons Named in the Old English Martyrology
    (pp. 387-393)
  15. Index of Authors and Texts
    (pp. 394-397)
  16. Index of Place-Names and Geographical Terms
    (pp. 398-400)
  17. Back Matter
    (pp. 401-402)