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New Perspectives on Medieval Scotland, 1093-1286

New Perspectives on Medieval Scotland, 1093-1286

Edited by MATTHEW HAMMOND
Volume: 32
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 256
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt31nk19
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  • Book Info
    New Perspectives on Medieval Scotland, 1093-1286
    Book Description:

    The years between the deaths of King Mael Coluim and Queen Margaret in 1093 and King Alexander III in 1286 witnessed the formation of a kingdom resembling the Scotland we know today, which was a full member of the European club of monarchies; the period is also marked by an explosion in the production of documents. This volume includes a range of new studies casting fresh light on the institutions and people of the Scottish kingdom, especially in the thirteenth century. New perspectives are offered on topics as diverse as the limited reach of Scottish royal administration and justice, the ties that bound the unfree to their lords, the extent of a political community in the time of King Alexander II, a view of Europeanization from the spread of a common material culture, the role of a major Cistercian monastery in the kingdom and the broader world, and the idea of the neighbourhood in Scots law. There are also chapters on the corpus of charters and names and the innovative technology behind the People of Medieval Scotland prosopographical database, which made use of over 6000 individual documents from the period. Matthew Hammond is a Research Associate at the University of Glasgow. Contributors: John Bradley, Stuart Campbell, David Carpenter, Matthew Hammond, Emilia Jamroziak, Cynthia Neville, Michele Pasin, Keith Stringer, Alice Taylor.

    eISBN: 978-1-78204-135-1
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. List of illustrations and tables
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. List of contributors
    (pp. vii-vii)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. viii-viii)
    Matthew Hammond
  6. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. ix-xiii)
  7. Maps
    (pp. xiv-xvi)
  8. 1 INTRODUCTION: THE PARADOX OF MEDIEVAL SCOTLAND, 1093–1286
    (pp. 1-52)
    Matthew Hammond

    It was this quotation from Rees Davies’s masterful The First English Empire: Power and Identities in the British Isles 1093–1343 (2000) that first gave voice to the notion of the ‘paradox of medieval Scotland’, a notion which we took as the title of the project that led to this book. Davies was concerned with showing that an expansive socio-cultural and linguistic ‘Anglicisation’ was harnessed by the Anglo-Norman and Angevin kings to establish a ‘first English empire’ across Britain and Ireland in the central middle ages. Tempered by a hard-edged ethnic worldview which cast the Celtic-speaking peoples of Wales, Ireland,...

  9. 2 THE SCOTTISH ‘POLITICAL COMMUNITY’ IN THE REIGN OF ALEXANDER II (1214–49)
    (pp. 53-84)
    Keith Stringer

    Historians of the emerging ‘states’ of medieval Western Europe are generally agreed that the benchmarks of an effective polity included defined territorial frontiers, institutionalised governance, and the notion of the realm as a ‘community’, a concept closely linked with the development of parliamentary assemblies. It is usually accepted that Alexander II’s Scotland had sufficient solidity to meet the first two requirements. Thus, the Tweed–Solway line was confirmed as a boundary between sovereign polities by the Treaty of York of 1237, and the crown had the entire Scottish mainland within its grasp by 1249. Again, while regal government was relatively...

  10. 3 HOMO LIGIUS AND UNFREEDOM IN MEDIEVAL SCOTLAND
    (pp. 85-116)
    Alice Taylor

    In a conference on feudalism held in 1999, Chris Wickham identified three main ‘ideal types’ or models of feudalism that had dominated twentieth-century historiography: first, ‘Marxist feudalism’, which focused on the relationship between the peasant who worked the land, and the lord, who controlled it; second, ‘juridical feudalism’ or feudo-vassalic feudalism, which prioritised the relationship between lord and vassal, centred on the holding of a piece of land, the fee or fief;¹ and third, feudalism as a type of society, comprising its economic bases, cultural manifestation and socio-political bonds. This type of society was outlined in the final few pages...

  11. 4 SCOTTISH ROYAL GOVERNMENT IN THE THIRTEENTH CENTURY FROM AN ENGLISH PERSPECTIVE
    (pp. 117-160)
    David Carpenter

    All historians would agree that English identity in the thirteenth century was shaped by both the burdens and the benefits of royal government. It was in reaction to the burdens that the rebels of 1215, in Magna Carta’s security clause, called into being ‘the community of the land’ to enforce the Charter’s terms.¹ Yet the realm, or much of it, was also united by the ‘common law’, ‘a royal benefit granted to the people by the goodness of the king’, as Glanvill put it, which meant that throughout England, a vast amount of civil litigation was decided by juries before...

  12. 5 NEIGHBOURS, THE NEIGHBOURHOOD, AND THE VISNET IN SCOTLAND, 1125–1300
    (pp. 161-174)
    Cynthia J. Neville

    In the spring of 1266 Alexander Stewart lord of Dundonald set his seal to a charter that extended to Melrose Abbey a series of privileges designed to enhance the already broad authority that the abbot and monks exercised over their Ayrshire-based estates.¹ Among these was exemption from the obligation to make suit of Stewart’s baronial court and the opportunity henceforth to reserve to themselves the profits of justice arising from the trial of miscreants resident on abbey lands. The monks, however, pressed their benefactor for more still, and secured from Stewart measures that would in future facilitate the trial of...

  13. 6 CISTERCIAN IDENTITIES IN TWELFTH- AND THIRTEENTH-CENTURY SCOTLAND: THE CASE OF MELROSE ABBEY
    (pp. 175-182)
    Emilia Jamroziak

    The concept of ‘Cistercianness’, Cistercian ethos or ideal, has a long history, and on the whole has been understood as something that developed fairly early on, in the first decades of the twelfth century, and then continued to shape monastic history for the rest of the middle ages. Therefore, any deviation from it has been seen as a symptom of decline and diversion from a correct path. The editions of key early Cistercian sources by Chrysogonus Waddell changed the chronology of many of these texts and made clear that they, and hence the ideas contained in them, developed over several...

  14. 7 THE LANGUAGE OF OBJECTS: MATERIAL CULTURE IN MEDIEVAL SCOTLAND
    (pp. 183-202)
    Stuart D. Campbell

    The material culture and archaeology of medieval Scotland are familiar from both archaeological excavation and museum collections, although that familiarity has often proved an impediment to a fuller understanding. Those objects commonly collected and curated by museums are typically of a particular quality, and this concentration on high-status objects can lead to a circular and self-fulfilling interpretation of their use and significance. The importance and meaning of these objects has often been overshadowed by the attention given to the wider historical picture, not least by archaeologists themselves, and it is a key question whether these objects are primarily illustrative and...

  15. 8 STRUCTURING THAT WHICH CANNOT BE STRUCTURED: A ROLE FOR FORMAL MODELS IN REPRESENTING ASPECTS OF MEDIEVAL SCOTLAND
    (pp. 203-214)
    John Bradley and Michele Pasin

    Computing offers something of a paradox when it comes to historical studies. On one hand, one suspects that almost all academic historians in at least Western Europe and North America have a computer both in their office and at home and use it daily for email, word processing, and for surfing the World Wide Web. However, in spite of their daily contact with the machine, they view it as having little or nothing to do with the essence of their research. Now, the fact that historians use the computer every day as a part of their research activities, but both...

  16. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 215-236)
  17. INDEX
    (pp. 237-253)
  18. Back Matter
    (pp. 254-257)