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Anglo-Norman Studies 36

Anglo-Norman Studies 36: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2013

Edited by David Bates
Copyright Date: 2014
Edition: NED - New edition
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 304
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt5vj7bq
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  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 36
    Book Description:

    The contributions collected in this volume demonstrate the full range and vitality of current work on the Anglo-Norman period in a variety of disciplines. They begin with Elisabeth van Houts' Allen Brown Memorial Lecture, which makes a major contribution to understanding Normandy's early history. A number of essays deal illuminatingly and provocatively with monastic culture (both male and female) and with associated literary production, from the making of the famous Worcester cartularies to new insights into the cultural world of forgery. There are also articles on the cross-Channel Anglo-Norman economy, a comparative study of Angevin and Hohenstaufen succession strategies, and Wace's treatment of women and power. David Bates is Professorial Fellow, University of East Anglia.BR> Contributors: Elisabeth van Houts, Ilya Afanasyev, Mathieu Arnoux, Robert Berkhofer III, Laura Cleaver, Matthew Hammond, Susan M. Johns, Catherine Letouzey-Réty, Alheydis Plassmann, Sigbjorn Olsen Sonnesyn, Andrew Wareham, Teresa Webber, Emily Winkler.

    eISBN: 978-1-78204-297-6
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND TABLES
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. ix-xi)
    David Bates
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xii-xvi)
  6. THE PLANCTUS ON THE DEATH OF WILLIAM LONGSWORD (943) AS A SOURCE FOR TENTH-CENTURY CULTURE IN NORMANDY AND AQUITAINE (The R. Allen Brown Memorial Lecture, 2013)
    (pp. 1-22)
    Elisabeth van Houts

    ThePlanctus, or lament, is a contemporary Latin poem on the murder of William Longsword, count of Rouen, on 17 December 942.¹ It belongs to the Carolingian genre of lament (planctus) poems, which bewail the death of a beloved person.² Laments were written for rulers, bishops or other prominent people, originally in Latin but also in the vernacular, of which the Occitanplanhare amongst the most common. Early composition after the death of the person lamented was the norm and, as I will argue, William’s was written in 943. ThePlanctuson William is an exceptionally important text for...

  7. BIBLICAL VOCABULARY AND NATIONAL DISCOURSE IN TWELFTH-CENTURY ENGLAND
    (pp. 23-38)
    Ilya Afanasyev

    In the introduction to a recent general book on religion, society, and politics in high medieval Britain, Henry Mayr-Harting felt compelled to justify his decision to omit from consideration the interplay between religion and national identity.¹ Although Mayr-Harting was not convinced about the significance of this topic, it is in my view a fruitful direction for further research on national identity in England during the ‘long’ twelfth century.² The unexhausted potential of this perspective on the generally well-studied theme of twelfth-century national identity is especially manifest in comparison with the existing literature on nationhood and ethnicity in Anglo-Saxon England that...

  8. BORDER, TRADE ROUTE, OR MARKET? THE CHANNEL AND THE MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN ECONOMY FROM THE TWELFTH TO THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY
    (pp. 39-52)
    Mathieu Arnoux

    On 8 September 1435, at the peace conference held at Arras, the English delegates received from the French ambassadors a letter with their ‘last offers’ to put an end to the war between the two nations. The main condition was ‘that upon the part of England, there be a renunciation, sufficiently and for ever, of the title and right they advance to the crown of France’. In which case, the French king consented and agreed

    that to the said king shall belong and shall remain in perpetual inheritance all that they held and occupy at present in the duchy of...

  9. GUERNO THE FORGER AND HIS CONFESSION
    (pp. 53-68)
    Robert F. Berkhofer III

    In 1131, Pope Innocent II summoned a great council to the city of Reims in northern France to rally support for his papacy. It was a very large gathering, featuring bishops from all over western Christendom. This was a momentous council, since the Church had been divided by schism – since the death of Honorius II in 1130 – between two contenders for the papacy, Innocent II and Anacletus II. Innocent II eventually triumphed with the support of King Louis VI of France, and the spiritual leaders Norbert of Xanten and Bernard of Clairvaux. Moreover, Innocent II used the council...

  10. FROM CODEX TO ROLL: ILLUSTRATING HISTORY IN THE ANGLO-NORMAN WORLD IN THE TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES
    (pp. 69-90)
    Laura Cleaver

    In the majority of cases, the process of transmission for texts found in both rolls and codices in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries seems, logically, to have moved from roll to codex.¹ Material recorded first on rolls that could be easily expanded through the addition of sheets of parchment might then be copied into sturdier books. Yet occasionally the process was reversed, with texts that were widely available in book form being copied into rolls.² Part of the explanation for this must lie in the visual appearance of the resulting rolls, which contributed to shaping the experience of the user....

  11. THE ADOPTION AND ROUTINIZATION OF SCOTTISH ROYAL CHARTER PRODUCTION FOR LAY BENEFICIARIES, 1124–1195
    (pp. 91-116)
    Matthew Hammond

    In the Europeanizing societies of the central Middle Ages the question of when kings began to produce charters in favour of lay beneficiaries, usually their own sworn men, is a salient one.¹ That religious institutions dominated the early phases of the expansion of literate methods of record-keeping is well known, but one key milestone in the road that would eventually lead to widespread use and acceptance of written documents throughout most levels of lay society was when the king’s clerks began to produce charters recording gifts to lay subjects, because this appears to be when administrative literacy was first used...

  12. WOMEN AND POWER IN THE ROMAN DE ROU OF WACE
    (pp. 117-134)
    Susan M. Johns

    In 1155 Wace of Bayeux completed theRoman de Brutand began his verse chronicle, theRoman de Rou. Of the two, theRouhas in general been less extensively studied. In order to set this study into a secure analytical framework the discussion will explore the way Wace has been evaluated by historians and literary scholars to clarify some of the approaches that may be taken to reading him. It will build on this discussion to explore the way that Wace portrayed women in theRou, in order to consider whether they were central to family power and Norman...

  13. LITERACY AND ESTATE ADMINISTRATION IN A GREAT ANGLO-NORMAN NUNNERY: HOLY TRINITY, CAEN, IN THE TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES
    (pp. 135-148)
    Catherine Letouzey-Réty

    In an article published in 2007, Kathleen Thompson presents a vivid picture of the authority and administrative efficiency of the abbesses of Caen at the beginning of the thirteenth century:

    En ce temps-là, en 1230, Isabelle de Crèvecœur, nouvelle abbesse de La Trinité de Caen, fit un voyage en Bretagne pour faire hommage au roi anglais, Henri III, pour les terres anglaises de sa maison. Malgré la séparation entre la Normandie et l’Angleterre les religieuses avaient gardé ces terres et les géraient efficacement. Isabelle et ses avocats plaidèrent dans les cours anglaises et l’existence de plusieurs «surveys» des...

  14. THE KING AND HIS SONS: HENRY II’S AND FREDERICK BARBAROSSA’S SUCCESSION STRATEGIES COMPARED
    (pp. 149-166)
    Alheydis Plassmann

    The relationship between kings and their sons in the High Middle Ages has been the subject of reflections by Anglophone and German scholars alike. Ralph Turner wrote in an article on Eleanor of Aquitaine: ‘Revolts by sons against the Norman dukes/kings made up a substantial portion of the family history … We can almost speak of a “Norman tradition of family hostility”.’¹ Karl-Heinrich Krüger, on the other hand, was sure that severe conflicts between father and son happened repeatedly in the Empire.² Juxtaposing these two opinions I hope makes my point as to why a comparison between different realms might...

  15. IN VINEA SORECH LABORARE: THE CULTIVATION OF UNITY IN TWELFTH-CENTURY MONASTIC HISTORIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 167-188)
    Sigbjørn Olsen Sønnesyn

    Ecce quam bonum et quam iucundum habitare fratres in unum– see how good and how delightful it is for brothers to live together in unity’: thus wrote the psalmist in Psalm 132, and there is a mass of evidence suggesting that medieval monks not only agreed, but even found this verse particularly applicable to their own profession.¹ Unity, ordered communal life, was a highly desirable good, and could be sought in a variety of units: families, local communities, larger political units, but also in monastic communities, and in the universal Church. But what, in basic terms, allowed brothers to...

  16. THE REDACTION OF CARTULARIES AND ECONOMIC UPHEAVAL IN WESTERN ENGLAND c.996–1096
    (pp. 189-220)
    Andrew Wareham

    For over half a century historians have suggested that population growth, economic development and agricultural innovation supported and enhanced the cultural, intellectual and spiritual achievements of Benedictine monasticism and new monastic orders in late Anglo-Saxon England and Anglo-Norman Britain.¹ These developments were gradual and have provided the basis for suggesting that two Worcester cartularies fulfilled different functions. In recent years the transformation of Anglo-Saxon England has been presented within an inter-disciplinary framework which has brought together archaeology, history, numismatics, and landscape studies.² The success of the research programme has had an unintended consequence in that less attention has been given...

  17. MONASTIC SPACE AND THE USE OF BOOKS IN THE ANGLO-NORMAN PERIOD
    (pp. 221-240)
    Teresa Webber

    In an exhibition of manuscripts from Anglo-Norman England held to mark the thirty-sixth Battle Conference, the Eadwine Psalter (Trinity College, MS R.17.1) held pride of place as one of the masterpieces of Anglo-Norman book production. It was made during the mid-twelfth century by teams of scribes and artists working in collaboration at the cathedral priory of Christ Church, Canterbury,¹ and contains a triple psalter together with liturgical calendar and canticles, each psalm accompanied by a Latin psalter gloss, prologues and collects, Old English and Anglo-Norman interlinear translations, and pictorial illustration.² A decade or so after the book was completed, various...

  18. 1074 IN THE TWELFTH CENTURY
    (pp. 241-258)
    Emily A. Winkler

    Chronologically speaking, 1074 was in the eleventh century. But if a year matters to us as historians, it is usually because it was significant, or because it became significant at some other point in time. In terms of its significance to Anglo-Norman studies, I propose that 1074 be relocated to the twelfth century.

    Years and dates are useful tools and markers for the modern historian. Several Anglo-Norman dates in particular have continued to serve as focal points and titles, most notably 1066 and 1086.¹ By 1086 the English aristocracy was mostly replaced, and the Domesday survey was completed, a document...

  19. Back Matter
    (pp. 259-272)