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Fourteenth Century England VIII

Fourteenth Century England VIII

Edited by J. S. Hamilton
Copyright Date: 2014
Edition: NED - New edition
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 176
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt5vj7tg
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  • Book Info
    Fourteenth Century England VIII
    Book Description:

    Drawing on a diverse range of documentary, literary and material evidence, the contributors to this volume examine several inter-related topics on political, social and cultural matters in late medieval England. Aspects of both arms production and armigerous society are explored, from the emergence of royal armourers in the early fourteenth century to the social implications of later armour and armorial bearings. Another major focus is the church and religion more broadly. The nature and significance of the ceremonial entry, the adventus, of bishops is explored, as well as the legal impact of provisions in shaping church-state relations in mid-century. Religious constructs of women are considered in a comparative analysis of orthodox and Lollard texts. Finally, a group of papers looks at aspects of politics at the centre, with an examination of the queenship of Isabella of France and the issue of the Mortimer inheritance in the early years of Richard II. J.S. Hamilton is Professor and Chair, Department of History, Baylor University. Contributors: Beth Allison Barr, Philip Caudrey, Katherine Harvey, Mark King, Malcolm Mercer, Shelagh Mitchell, Lisa Benz St John, Charlotte Whatley

    eISBN: 978-1-78204-269-3
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-vii)
    J. S. Hamilton
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. viii-x)
  6. KING’S ARMOURERS AND THE GROWTH OF THE ARMOURER’S CRAFT IN EARLY FOURTEENTH-CENTURY LONDON
    (pp. 1-20)
    Malcolm Mercer

    Until the establishment of Henry VIII’s workshops, the domestic manufacture of arms and armour has generally been written off as rather insignificant, the assumption being that there was a preference for purchasing both basic and fine-quality armour from Italy, Flanders or Germany.¹ The establishment of his own armour workshop at Greenwich by Henry VIII shortly after his accession in 1509 has been identified quite rightly as one of the new king’s earliest ambitions. Emulating the court workshop of the Emperor Charles V established at Innsbruck in 1505, Henry VIII was able to create a domestic industry capable of producing fine-quality...

  7. IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE QUEEN: ISABELLA OF FRANCE, EDWARD II AND THE IMAGE OF A FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIP
    (pp. 21-42)
    Lisa Benz St John

    Recent scholarship on medieval queenship has developed a paradigm for the relationship between the late medieval king and queen. In this paradigm, the office of queenship is an essential part of the crown and of the king’s exercise of sovereignty. Both the king and queen benefited from this relationship, with the queen actively involved in creating, upholding and performing the roles of queenship (intercession, motherhood, patronage and so on), and the king manipulating them to legitimize and strengthen his own rule.¹ In this way, a partnership, albeit an uneven one, was created for the benefit of the crown.

    Surprisingly, this...

  8. THE FIRST ENTRY OF THE BISHOP: EPISCOPAL ADVENTUS IN FOURTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLAND
    (pp. 43-58)
    Katherine Harvey

    In August 1310, Walter Reynolds wrote a short letter to John de Wyke, prior of Worcester. Reynolds had recently been appointed chancellor of England, but his letter did not relate to royal business; rather, he was writing in his capacity as bishop of Worcester. His enthronement as bishop, he wrote, had been long delayed, and he was now anxious to remedy this; within a fortnight, he wrote again, this time to fix the date for his installation.¹ The ceremony, which finally took place in late September 1310, was essentially a ritual in three stages: the first was the bishop’s entry...

  9. TEMPORALITIES BE TAKEN: EDWARD III, UNRULY ECCLESIASTICS AND THE FIGHT FOR THE BENEFICES OF EXETER, 1337–60
    (pp. 59-82)
    Charlotte Whatley

    The anticlerical period often attributed to Edward III’s reign saw a concerted royal effort to maintain control over a lower clergy that increasingly acted against the king and the interests of his realm. Papal provisions and English advowson rights had long been a subject of contention in English church–state relations.¹ The tumultuous political atmosphere of the mid-fourteenth century, coupled with attempts on both sides to consolidate resources, created a situation in England in which it was often difficult to know which party had legal claim to present to a benefice. The lower clergy took advantage of the opportunities provided...

  10. THE ARMOUR OF SIR ROBERT SALLE: AN INDICATION OF SOCIAL STATUS?
    (pp. 83-94)
    Shelagh Mitchell

    The chronicles of Jean Froissart state that during the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381, Sir Robert Salle was in his native Norfolk; that the rebels reminded him he was the son of a villein, a mason; that they appealed to him to be their leader; that he refused, offering instead armed combat; that losing his footing in his stirrups he abandoned his horse and faced the large mob alone. Not surprisingly, he was hacked to pieces. According to Froissart, Salle was wearing his armour on that fateful day and while the vast numbers said to have been involved in the incident...

  11. RICHARD II, THE MORTIMER INHERITANCE AND THE MARCH OF WALES, 1381–84
    (pp. 95-118)
    Mark King

    Few things were as important to the late medieval nobility as the secure preservation of their estates and the right of their heirs to inherit unhindered. As Plucknett wrote, ‘in a turbulent world, the idea of inheritance was one which all accepted without question as part of the natural order … the most telling charge which could be brought against a tyrant was to say that he had thrust men out of their inheritances.’¹ As a king who would ultimately be deposed for breaking this very principle, Richard II first gave his subjects cause for concern over this issue through...

  12. WAR, CHIVALRY AND REGIONAL SOCIETY: EAST ANGLIA’S WARRIOR GENTRY BEFORE THE COURT OF CHIVALRY
    (pp. 119-146)
    Philip Caudrey

    In recent decades the surviving late medieval records of the Court of Chivalry have received considerable scholarly attention.¹ Presided over by the constable and earl marshal of England, the Court was in all likelihood extremely active during the age of the Hundred Years War.² Its registers are now lost and only sporadic cases have survived, often in miscellaneous collections, or in later copies.³ The Court was usually the first port-of-call for military men who possessed unresolved grievances relating to campaigns on which they had served, and its jurisdiction principally covered matters relating to treason, ransoms, rights to prisoners, and rights...

  13. A ‘STERRE OF ÞE SEE TO 3YUE LY3T TO MEN’ AND ‘MYRROURE TO ALLE SINFUL’: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF BIBLICAL WOMEN IN THE ENGLISH WYCLIFFITE SERMONS WITH JOHN MIRK’S FESTIAL
    (pp. 147-164)
    Beth Allison Barr

    A late medieval English sermon penned during the last two decades of the fourteenth century describes Mary Magdalene as preaching. Her sermon was inspired after she witnessed a local lord in Marseilles offering sacrifices in a pagan temple.

    Whan see Magdaleyn grete pepul comyng towarde þis tempul and þe lorde of þe cuntre to hau done offering and sacrifice to here mawmentis, but Mag// daleyne was so ful of grace of þe holy goste . þt scheo be hur gracious wordys turned hem alle aɜeyne hom. And for þis lorde sethe hyr ful of alle swet//nesse and gentryes. He had...

  14. INDEX
    (pp. 165-174)
  15. Back Matter
    (pp. 175-179)