Skip to Main Content
Have library access? Log in through your library
Anglo-Norman Studies 32

Anglo-Norman Studies 32: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2009

Edited by C. P. Lewis
Copyright Date: 2010
Edition: NED - New edition
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 254
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt7zstpw
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 32
    Book Description:

    This latest collection reflects the full range and vitality of the current work on the Anglo-Norman period. It opens with the R. Allen Brown Memorial Lecture for 2009, a wide-ranging reflection by the distinguished French historian Dominique Barthélemy on the Peace of God and the role of bishops in the long eleventh century. Economic history is prominent in papers on the urban transformation in England between 900 and 1100, on the roots of the royal forest in England, and on trade links between England and Lower Normandy. A close study of the Surrey manor of Mortlake brings in topography, another aspect of which appears in an article on the representation of outdoor space by Norman and Anglo-Norman chroniclers. Social history is treated in papers dealing with the upbringing of the children of the Angevin counts and with the developing ideas of knighthood and chivalry in the works of Dudo of Saint-Quentin and Benoît of Sainte-Maure. Finally, political ideas are examined through careful reading of texts in papers on writing the rebellion of Earl Waltheof in the twelfth century and on the use of royal titles and prayers for the king in Anglo-Norman charters. Contributors: Dominique Barthélemy, Kathryn Dutton, Leonie Hicks, Richard Holt, Joanna Huntington, Laurence Jean-Marie, Dolly Jorgensen, Max Lieberman, Stephen Marritt, Pamela Taylor

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-823-0
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

Export Selected Citations Export to NoodleTools Export to RefWorks Export to EasyBib Export a RIS file (For EndNote, ProCite, Reference Manager, Zotero, Mendeley...) Export a Text file (For BibTex)
  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. LIST OF MAPS AND TABLES
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. vii-viii)
    Chris Lewis
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. ix-xii)
  6. THE PEACE OF GOD AND BISHOPS AT WAR IN THE GALLIC LANDS FROM THE LATE TENTH TO THE EARLY TWELFTH CENTURY R. Allen Brown Memorial Lecture
    (pp. 1-23)
    Dominique Barthélemy

    The ‘Peace of God’ excites the modern imagination. It is thought of as a pacifist movement to abolish a feudal system based on war or halt its progress towards total domination. The Church of the year 1000, so the story goes, faced down the lords and rescued the Capetian kingdom from chaos pending the reinvigoration of kingship around 1100. What a vital moment in social and Christian history it was indeed! The bishops of Aquitaine, Gothia, Burgundy, and France had heard the sighs of the peasant victims of the castle-knights’ warlike pillaging. They summoned them one and all into the...

  7. AD ERUDIENDUM TRADIDIT: THE UPBRINGING OF ANGEVIN COMITAL CHILDREN
    (pp. 24-39)
    Kathryn Dutton

    This paper examines some aspects of how the counts of Anjou raised, educated, and trained their children during the first half of the twelfth century.¹ The considerable corpus of distinctive Angevin comitalactacontains rich evidence, often lacking from the chronicles, which indicates that from an early age the counts’ children remained within the parental household for training and education under non-parental figures.² Some of these, namely the masters (magistri) of Henry II, have been much discussed, while others, given the titlenutricii, have received only limited attention. The Angevin charters provide extensive evidence for the presence of bothmagistri...

  8. COMING AND GOING: THE USE OF OUTDOOR SPACE IN NORMAN AND ANGLO-NORMAN CHRONICLES
    (pp. 40-56)
    Leonie V. Hicks

    Conceptions of space in eleventh- and twelfth-century Norman and Anglo-Norman chronicles were complex.¹ They encompassed the natural environment, political relationships, and more abstract notions, such as the links between this world and the next. Central to their understanding was the movement of people through and around the landscape. The roads, rivers, and watercourses they travelled allowed the chroniclers to link different areas geographically and conceptually, adding to our knowledge of how these writers structured their narratives and how they understood medieval society.² In order to explore the chroniclers’ use of outdoor space and what it meant, I will examine four...

  9. THE URBAN TRANSFORMATION IN ENGLAND, 900–1100
    (pp. 57-78)
    Richard Holt

    Marc Bloch warned historians againstl’idole des origines– ‘the idol of origins’, the interpretation of an historical situation by reference to its origins, however distant, while neglecting the effect of contemporary factors. At its most extreme, this can lead us to treat ‘origins’ not only as a beginning that explains but even as a complete explanation.¹ An illustration could well be ‘the origins of towns’, a traditional area of research which has too often seen an assumption that it is the circumstances of a town’s ‘beginnings’ that need to be explained rather than its subsequent success as a commercial settlement,...

  10. THE TAMING OF THE LAITY: WRITING WALTHEOF AND REBELLION IN THE TWELFTH CENTURY
    (pp. 79-95)
    Joanna Huntington

    In the early hours of 31 May 1076, Waltheof, earl of Northumbria, was about to be decapitated.¹ He was one of the few native nobles who had retained his title under the new Norman regime, but had been found guilty of treason for his part in a rebellion against William the Conqueror. For a year in the king’s prison at Winchester he had been the model of good behaviour, aheros

    a man of great and elegant physique, exceeding many thousands in his largesse and courage, a devoted worshipper of God, a humble auditor of priests and of all religious,...

  11. CLOSE RELATIONS? SOME EXAMPLES OF TRADE LINKS BETWEEN ENGLAND AND THE TOWNS AND PORTS OF LOWER NORMANDY IN THE THIRTEENTH AND EARLY FOURTEENTH CENTURIES
    (pp. 96-113)
    Laurence Jean-Marie

    It is not my ambition, in the present paper, to offer an overview of the economic relations between western Normandy and England, let alone the whole of the British Isles. Rather, I wish to situate the topic of my current research, and suggest a possible perspective on particular aspects.

    Close relations? The question can be asked on several counts. To start with, it is asymmetrical. The scale of the two regions differs as, no doubt, do the issues involved. England appears to be a far more important commercial partner for Lower Normandy than the other way around. Nevertheless, for certain...

  12. THE ROOTS OF THE ENGLISH ROYAL FOREST
    (pp. 114-128)
    Dolly Jørgensen

    Histories of the English forest inevitably use Fitz Nigel’s definition of the forest from hisDialogus de Scaccarioof Henry II’s reign as their reference point.² In their supplement to Stubbs’sConstitutional Historyon English forests, Ch. Petit-Dutaillis and Georges LeFebvre went so far as say that ‘the nature of the Forest could not be more clearly stated’,³ and H. A. Cronne wrote that there is ‘no more succinct definition of the Forest’.⁴

    Fitz Nigel’s definition stresses three things: legal structures, royal hunting, and royal prerogative. He believed that noble love of the hunt was the only reason for the...

  13. KNIGHTHOOD AND CHIVALRY IN THE HISTORIES OF THE NORMAN DUKES: DUDO AND BENOÎT
    (pp. 129-183)
    Max Lieberman

    According to Dudo of Saint-Quentin, the young Richard, the future Duke Richard I of Normandy, surrounded himself with ‘the most prudent and renowned retainers’; he ‘shone resplendent in morals and merits, and through just government he strenuously guided clergy and people’; a severe punisher of crimes and a ‘munificent distributor of good things’, Richard ‘obliterated vices with the teeming accumulation of virtues’.¹ Dudo’s portrayal of the young Richard I may be compared with that in theChronique des ducs de Normandie. This is the second of the two Norman histories in French which were written at the behest of Henry...

  14. PRAYERS FOR THE KING AND ROYAL TITLES IN ANGLO-NORMAN CHARTERS
    (pp. 184-202)
    Stephen Marritt

    Anglo-Norman charters have sometimes seemed less forthcoming than those of other dynasties about contemporary kingship.¹ Some historians, perhaps influenced by developing diplomatic conventions, have characterized the Anglo-Norman kings as more pragmatic and prosaic than others.² For example, the royalintitulatio, almost invariablyRex Anglorum, has often been contrasted with imperialistic Anglo-Saxon royal titles to argue that the Anglo-Norman kings were less interested in the ideology of overlordship and empire than either their predecessors or contemporary writers.³ It is such writers who have been most used by historians of Anglo-Norman king-ship, but their works come with their own problems and their...

  15. DOMESDAY MORTLAKE
    (pp. 203-230)
    Pamela Taylor

    Mortlake today is famous as the settlement on the southern or Surrey shore of the Thames that marks the Boat Race finishing line,¹ but this is only Mortlake the erst-while village and small ancient parish.² The archbishop of Canterbury’s Domesday manor was far larger, extending over the whole contiguous block to the east: Barnes and Putney (and thus the whole of the Boat Race course) and Wimbledon. The archbishop lost the manor in 1536 but it survived into the twentieth century as a single unit, although for centuries more normally called Wimbledon.³ Before discussing its problems between 1066 and 1086,...

  16. Back Matter
    (pp. 231-243)