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Anglo-Norman Studies 27

Anglo-Norman Studies 27: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2004

Edited by John Gillingham
Volume: 27
Copyright Date: 2005
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 222
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt81fvn
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  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 27
    Book Description:

    This volume contains the usual wide range of topics, and offers some unusual and provocative perspectives, including an examination of what the evidence of zooarchaeology can reveal about the Conquest. The other subjects discussed are the battle of Alençon; the impact of rebellion on Little Domesday; Lawrence of Durham; Thomas Becket; Peter of Blois; Anglo-French peace conferences; episcopal elections and the loss of Normandy; Norman identity in southern Italian chronicles; and the Normans on crusade. The contributors, from Germany, France and Denmark as well as Britain, and the United States, are RICHARD BARTON, NAOMI SYKES, LUCY MARTEN, MIA MÜNSTER-SWENDSEN, JOHN D. COTTS, J.E.M. BENHAM, JÖRG PELTZER, JULIE BARRAU, EMILY ALBU, EWAN JOHNSON, G. A. LOUD, HANNA VOLLRATH.

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-206-1
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. vii-vii)
    John Gillingham
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. viii-xii)
  6. PROBING THE PASSIONS OF A NORMAN ON CRUSADE: THE GESTA FRANCORUM ET ALIORUM HIEROSOLIMITANORUM
    (pp. 1-15)
    Emily Albu

    When Pope Urban II preached the crusade at Clermont in 1095, he had good reasons to hope that Normans would volunteer for the mission. They were formidable fighters, a fine match against the Seljuq Turks, who had taken Jerusalem, overrun Syria, and swept through ‘Romania’ (the Byzantine heartland of Asia Minor) following the debacle at Manzikert in 1071. Surely Norman warriors could restore Jerusalem to the Christian world. Their journeys to Jerusalem would bring another benefit to Christendom, too: the disappearance of those fractious Normans from the west.¹

    Urban must have been pleased, then, with the list of Norman knights...

  7. GILBERT FOLIOT ET L’ECRITURE, UN EXÉGÈTE EN POLITIQUE
    (pp. 16-31)
    Julie Barrau

    Les clercs médiévaux eurent longtemps un privilège presque exclusif sur la maîtrise du verbe écrit; le litteratus et l’homme d’Eglise se superposaient. Or, à l’origine de cette maîtrise du verbe, il y a le Verbe. Les clercs médiévaux, du moins ceux d’un certain niveau, sont supposés avoir une très bonne connaissance de la Bible, apprise dans les écoles, entendue, puis lue et méditée, enfin prêchée durant les offices. Et il est certes évident que la sacra scriptura, objet de l’exégèse, est aussi le matériau essentiel de la théologie et le support privilégié de la prédication. Cette place incomparable occupée par...

  8. WRITING WARFARE, LORDSHIP AND HISTORY: THE GESTA CONSULUM ANDEGAVORUM’S ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE OF ALENÇON
    (pp. 32-51)
    Richard Barton

    In December 1118, outside of Alençon in southern Normandy, Henry I suffered one of the few outright military defeats of his long and illustrious career.¹ While the impact of the battle is relatively well-known,² the battle itself has received a great deal less attention. On the face of it this relative lack of attention is surprising, for unlike other less well-attested Anglo-Norman battles, the battle of Alençon boasts several contemporary accounts of differing lengths and historical value. Two, namely the entry in the Angevin Annals of Saint-Aubin and a sentence in Suger’s Life of Louis VI, are quite short. Two...

  9. ANGLO-FRENCH PEACE CONFERENCES IN THE TWELFTH CENTURY
    (pp. 52-67)
    J. E. M. Benham

    Few historical problems have received so much attention among those studying the modern period and so little attention among medieval scholars as that of peacemaking.¹ Searching the shelves of any university library it soon becomes evident that the issue of peacemaking has been tackled from many angles in the modern period, so that, for instance, the 1919 conference of Paris intended to settle the unresolved issues of the First World War has seen studies from the vantage point of almost every individual nation represented on that occasion.² Yet a similar search of the literature for the medieval period yields little...

  10. PETER OF BLOIS AND THE PROBLEM OF THE ‘COURT’ IN THE LATE TWELFTH CENTURY
    (pp. 68-84)
    John D. Cotts

    Peter of Blois did not take criticism well, which was unfortunate because his career as a member of the secular clergy made him extremely vulnerable to several different traditions of satire and invective. We detect what would appear to be a persecution complex in an epistolary tract that he wrote to an anonymous regular canon sometime around 1198, a tract titled Invectiva in depravatorem in most of the extant manuscripts.¹ Peter’s unknown adversary must have hit his mark, for the tract responds passionately and defensively to protect Peter’s reputation from charges that he had a less-than-stellar intellect, that as a...

  11. NORMANDY AND NORMAN IDENTITY IN SOUTHERN ITALIAN CHRONICLES
    (pp. 85-100)
    Ewan Johnson

    In Book Eleven of his Ecclesiastical History Orderic Vitalis records the feelings of Robert of Montfort, who was in Italy after fleeing Normandy in 1106, upon discovering the presence of others from the duchy in the entourage of Bohemond, prince of Antioch (1098–1111): ‘there to his joy [Robert] discovered some of his own fellow countrymen. Hugh of Le Puiset and Simon of Anet, Ralph of Pont-Echanfray and Walchelin his brother, and many others from North of the Alps were there with Bohemond’.¹ The suggestion is that those Normans from north of the Alps formed a separate group of countrymen...

  12. MONASTIC CHRONICLES IN THE TWELFTH-CENTURY ABRUZZI
    (pp. 101-131)
    G. A. Loud

    The genre of chartulary-chronicles, that is a combination of an historical narrative with a substantial collection of original documents, usually pertaining to a monastic house, was relatively unusual, but far from unknown in medieval Europe. Students of Anglo-Norman England will be familiar with the Abingdon Chronicle and the Liber Eliensis, in particular, and a small number of other histories of this type were written in England and northern France, mostly in the middle or late twelfth century.¹ While there has been a tendency to dismiss such texts as a rather inferior form of history writing, a recent study of the...

  13. THE IMPACT OF REBELLION ON LITTLE DOMESDAY
    (pp. 132-150)
    Lucy Marten

    In 2001 Stephen Baxter began his important paper on the representation of lordship and land tenure in Domesday Book, with a quote from the contemporary Inquisitio Eliensis: ‘Who held it in the time of King Edward, who holds it now?’ (‘Quis tenuit eam tempore Regis Edwardi, quis modo tenet?’).¹ The fact that Domesday frequently provides information for two dates, one representing the position under the last acceptable (to the Norman compilers) English king and the other giving the position under William I in 1086, is part of what makes this text such a uniquely rich source. In this paper, I...

  14. SETTING THINGS STRAIGHT: LAW, JUSTICE AND ETHICS IN THE ORATIONES OF LAWRENCE OF DURHAM
    (pp. 151-168)
    Mia Münster-Swendsen

    Who eventually becomes a hallowed name in the literary canon for a given historical period is often a matter of coincidence, diverse conjunctures or, simply, inexplicable arbitrariness. Hence for various reasons some medieval authors undeservedly continue to languish in the shade of their better-known contemporaries. One such is Lawrence of Durham, generally neglected and only recently, yet still slowly, rediscovered – mainly by German philologists. The first edition of his main work, the Hypognosticon appeared as late as 2002. Yet judging from the quality of his works and the variety of genres and rhetorical devices he skilfully employed, Lawrence was...

  15. THE ANGEVIN KINGS AND CANON LAW: EPISCOPAL ELECTIONS AND THE LOSS OF NORMANDY
    (pp. 169-184)
    Jörg Peltzer

    Eight hundred years ago, in 1204, sixty years of Angevin rule in Normandy came to an end when King John failed to defend the duchy against Philip Augustus, king of France. This dramatic change of the ruling dynasty in what had been a central region of the Angevin empire has been much discussed among historians. In particular the extent to which John’s own behaviour contributed to the events of 1204 has been controversial. The judgements ranged from James Holt’s view that the structure of the Angevin empire was the major reason for its collapse,¹ to John Gillingham’s verdict that King...

  16. ZOOARCHAEOLOGY OF THE NORMAN CONQUEST
    (pp. 185-197)
    Naomi Sykes

    The Norman Conquest is widely held to be an important historical watershed, with eleventh- and twelfth-century texts suggesting occupation by a self-possessed people, the Gens Normannorum.¹ Yet in contrast to the abundance of textual evidence concerning it, the social and economic effects of 1066 are poorly documented in the archaeological record. Absence of a distinct material culture has led some scholars to question whether the Normans did indeed possess a common identity, whilst others have argued that without guidance from written sources the Norman Conquest would remain archaeologically invisible.² Without doubt, clear archaeological evidence for Conquest-related change is scarce. Research...

  17. WAS THOMAS BECKET CHASTE? UNDERSTANDING EPISODES IN THE BECKET LIVES
    (pp. 198-210)
    Hanna Vollrath

    Who was Thomas Becket? Many learned scholars have asked this question. What were his thoughts and convictions, what made him act the way he did? Was he a staunch defender of ecclesiastical rights against the encroachments of an imperious king? Was he convinced that canon law left him with no other choice? He certainly claimed to be speaking for the whole English Church, but on the way he somehow lost his fellow bishops. Was he just a very unpleasant person? But if so, why did the king not notice that when he was chancellor? Did he undergo a dramatic change...

  18. Back Matter
    (pp. 211-211)