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Anglo-Norman Studies 28

Anglo-Norman Studies 28: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2005

Edited by C. P. Lewis
Volume: 28
Copyright Date: 2006
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 200
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt81g53
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  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 28
    Book Description:

    The latest volume in the series concentrates, as always, on the half century before and the century after 1066, with papers which have many interconnections and range across different kinds of history. There is a particular focus on church history, with contributions on an Anglo-Saxon archiepiscopal manual, architecture and liturgy in post-Conquest Lincolnshire, Anglo-Norman cathedral chapters, and twelfth-century views of the tenth-century monastic reform. Other topics considered include social history (the Anglo-Norman family), gender (William of Malmesbury's representation of Bishop Wulfstan of Worcester), and politics (the sheriffs of Northumberland and Cumberland 1170-1185). The volume is completed with articles on Domesday Book and the post-Domesday Evesham Abbey surveys, and a double paper on land tenure and royal patronage. Contributors: STEPHEN BAXTER, JOHN BLAIR, HOWARD CLARKE, TRACEY-ANN COOPER, HUGH DOHERTY, PAUL EVERSON, DAVID STOCKER, KIRSTEN FENTON, VANESSA KING, JOHN MOORE, NICOLA ROBERTSON, DAVID ROFFE

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-207-8
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS, MAPS, AND TABLES
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. vii-vii)
    Chris Lewis
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. viii-x)
  6. INSIDE THE ANGLO-NORMAN FAMILY: LOVE, MARRIAGE, AND THE FAMILY
    (pp. 1-18)
    John S. Moore

    The Director will, I hope, recall his jesting response when I first suggested this topic to him: ‘I assume there is something to be said about it.’¹ The ill-informed will impute sarcasm: better-educated persons who know that Victoria County History editors have to be expert in every period of English history from Roman Britain to the present will recognize knowledge and good sense. Most of the sources to which scholars of the early modern or modern periods would immediately turn for enlightenment on the subject of family love – wills, ecclesiastical court depositions, diaries, autobiographies, biographies, private correspondence, from the eighteenth...

  7. LAND TENURE AND ROYAL PATRONAGE IN THE EARLY ENGLISH KINGDOM: A MODEL AND A CASE STUDY
    (pp. 19-46)
    Stephen Baxter and John Blair

    King Alfred’s version of St Augustine’s Soliloquies contains a famous allusion to the process of tenurial patronage:

    Every man likes, when he has built up a farm on his lord’s lease with his help, to stay there some time . . . and to work for himself on the lease both on sea and on land, until the time when he shall earn bookland and eternal inheritance through his lord’s kindness.²

    This paper is concerned with the various forms of patronage to which Alfred alludes: bookland, land which was not bookland, and leased land (Old English lænland). Its argument comes...

  8. THE HOMILIES OF A PRAGMATIC ARCHBISHOP’S HANDBOOK IN CONTEXT: COTTON TIBERIUS A. iii
    (pp. 47-64)
    Tracey-Anne Cooper

    British Library, Cotton MS Tiberius A. iii, a bilingual compilation manuscript of some ninety-four texts and two full-page illustrations, was produced at Christ Church, Canterbury, sometime between 1012 and 1023.¹ To modern sensibilities the manuscript presents an incongruous assortment of texts: monastic rules, homilies, liturgy, confessional directives, prognostics, scientific treatises, extra-canonical notes and commonplaces, hagiography, a charm, a lapidary, a manual for monastic sign language, and the examinatio of an incumbent bishop (Appendix, Table 2, lists the contents of the manuscript). By examining concurrent text and quire endings and the distribution of the manuscript’s scribal hands it has been possible...

  9. ROBERT DE VAUX AND ROGER DE STUTEVILLE, SHERIFFS OF CUMBERLAND AND NORTHUMBERLAND, 1170–1185
    (pp. 65-102)
    Hugh Doherty

    The counties of Northumberland and Cumberland, together with their castles, were surrendered to Henry II, king of the English, by Malcolm IV, king of Scots, at Chester in 1157.¹ At the Michaelmas session of the exchequer in 1158, the farms and profits of both counties were accounted for by their sheriffs, those of Northumberland by William de Vescy and those of Cumberland by Robert fitz Truite.² William de Vescy’s father Eustace fitz John had been killed in the king’s service in 1157;³ William himself was a landholder of substantial wealth in northern England.⁴ He continued to serve as sheriff of...

  10. THE COMMON STEEPLE? CHURCH, LITURGY, AND SETTLEMENT IN EARLY MEDIEVAL LINCOLNSHIRE
    (pp. 103-123)
    Paul Everson and David Stocker

    This modest, interdisciplinary paper is a report on fieldwork undertaken a decade ago in Lincolnshire, whilst the authors were collecting material for the Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture for that county.¹ On most maps of Anglo-Saxon remains in England, Lincolnshire is thickly spread with symbols marking churches. This exceptional density is mostly due to the survival in considerable numbers of church towers of the characteristically simple, tall, unbuttressed type exemplified in a complete form by St Peter-at-Gowts or St Mary-le-Wigford in the southern suburb of Lincoln (Fig. 1).² They are frequently said to be late Anglo-Saxon in date and thus...

  11. THE QUESTION OF MASCULINITY IN WILLIAM OF MALMESBURY’S PRESENTATION OF WULFSTAN OF WORCESTER
    (pp. 124-137)
    Kirsten A. Fenton

    One of the more unusual explanations for English defeat in 1066 appears in the Life of St Wulfstan.¹ In it Bishop Wulfstan lambastes English noblemen for their luxurious style of living as well as their long flowing hair and he warns them that this will lead to disaster if they do not mend their ways. Not one to be accused of being all talk and no action, Wulfstan proceeds to cut the hair of all those that he can with a special knife which he kept to hand precisely for this purpose.

    Anyone who thought it worth objecting he would...

  12. SHARE AND SHARE ALIKE? BISHOPS AND THEIR CATHEDRAL CHAPTERS:THE DOMESDAY EVIDENCE
    (pp. 138-152)
    Vanessa King

    This paper looks at the tenurial relationship between bishops and their familiae in the aftermath of the Norman Conquest, and in particular at the evidence in Domesday Book for the organization of a separate endowment for the community.¹ Although the evidence was considered by Professor Crosby in his major study of the mensa episcopalis,² it seems worth while reconsidering it afresh and in isolation, in order to get a better sense of how far the division of endowments between bishops and their chapters had progressed by the time that Domesday Book provides the first opportunity to look systematically across the...

  13. DUNSTAN AND MONASTIC REFORM: TENTH-CENTURY FACT OR TWELFTH-CENTURY FICTION?
    (pp. 153-167)
    Nicola Robertson

    The traditional view of Dunstan’s role in the English monastic revival of the tenth century, known as the Benedictine Reform, is as its instigator and leader.¹ Dunstan has been seen as the pivotal force behind the vigorous promotion of ‘reformed’ Benedictine monasticism which revitalized the religious life in England during this time. As Knowles states

    The beginning of the monastic revival in England, which set in being a life that was destined to endure till the Dissolution of the monasteries six hundred years later, may be dated from the year c. 940, when King Edmund, after his narrow escape from...

  14. DOMESDAY NOW
    (pp. 168-188)
    David Roffe

    The world of Domesday studies is divided between those who use Domesday data and those who merely worry about them.¹ Some five years ago Chris Lewis asserted that a sure-fire way of finding out what you are in for is to look up the word ‘pig’ in the index. If you find it you know that you are in for a feast of figures and yields. If not, look out for texts and procedure.² I do not know which he intended as a recommendation. I am going to hedge my bets here. I want to look at pigs but in...

  15. Back Matter
    (pp. 189-189)