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Anglo-Norman Studies 33

Anglo-Norman Studies 33: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2010

Edited by C. P. Lewis
Volume: 33
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 216
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt81m7n
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  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 33
    Book Description:

    The latest volume of Battle Conference proceedings emphasizes the European range and interdisciplinarity of the series. It opens with Anne Duggan's R. Allen Brown Memorial Lecture for 2010, on the effects of Pope Alexander III's so-called "marriage legislation" in England. Norman history is covered by chapters on the detailed account of Robert de Torigni's deeds as abbot of Mont Saint-Michel which he added to the monastic cartulary, and on religious life in Rouen in the late eleventh century, covering the rivalries but also the common outlook of the cathedral canons and the monks of St Ouen. Close readings of the work of two of the Anglo-Norman historians of the earlier twelfth century provide many new insights into their working methods and views of the world, specifically Willam of Malmesbury's use of ambiguity and innuendo, and Orderic Vitalis's treatment of the nexus between power and the display of emotions. There are also two papers on art history, giving sophisticated readings of the architecture shown in the Bayeux Tapestry and the politically charged glazing scheme that Archbishop Anselm installed at Canterbury cathedral. Contributors: Anne Duggan, Alison Alexander, Richard E. Barton, Thomas N. Bisson, Paul Hayward, T. A. Heslop, Elizabeth Carson Pastan. C. P. Lewis is a Research Fellow in the History Department at King's College, London, and a Senior Fellow of the Institute of Historical Research in the University of London.

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-953-4
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND TABLES
    (pp. vi-viii)
  4. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. ix-x)
    Chris Lewis
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xi-xiv)
  6. THE EFFECT OF ALEXANDER III’S ‘RULES ON THE FORMATION OF MARRIAGE’ IN ANGEVIN ENGLAND
    (pp. 1-22)
    Anne J. Duggan

    In a splendid but controversial paper read at the Fourth International Congress of Medieval Canon Law in Toronto in 1972, Charles Donahue presented the arresting argument that Pope Alexander III (1159–81) pursued a consistent policy in his judgments and consultations relating to matrimony, intended to undermine the prevailing structures supporting seigneurial and paternal control of marriage. ‘Alexander’s rules on the formation of marriage’, he wrote, ‘constitute a conscious, and at least partially successful, attempt to use the canon law to influence the course of social development.’ Further, he argued that the ‘rules’ were new, that they did diminish the...

  7. RIOTS, REFORM, AND RIVALRY: RELIGIOUS LIFE IN ROUEN, c. 1073—c. 1092
    (pp. 23-40)
    Alison Alexander

    An infamous riot of 1073 in the suburban monastery of Saint-Ouen at Rouen dominates current understanding of ecclesiastical life in the Norman capital in the second half of the eleventh century.¹ The violent clash between the Benedictine monks and their metropolitan archbishop attracted the attention of historians almost from the moment it occurred. It was recorded roughly contemporaneously in a set of annals written at Rouen cathedral in the mid 1070s.² From the late 1080s this record was copied into annals in several monasteries around Normandy, from where it subsequently spread to England. Finally, in the early 1090s an anonymous...

  8. EMOTIONS AND POWER IN ORDERIC VITALIS
    (pp. 41-60)
    Richard E. Barton

    ‘The word “power” (pouvoir) is vague in French.’¹ Thus Georges Duby, writing in 1991 about women and power. Although he proceeded in this context to provide a precise definition of power, his comment is perhaps more significant than even Duby realized. For while Duby intended merely to set the stage for his subsequent analysis, he inadvertently touched upon a central fact that describes many of the dozens of books and articles written over the past twenty years employing the word ‘power’ either in their titles or, more rarely, in their methodological apparatus. While studies of power, then, are ubiquitous, what...

  9. THE ‘ANNUARY’ OF ABBOT ROBERT DE TORIGNI (1155–1159)
    (pp. 61-74)
    Thomas N. Bisson

    This paper has to do with an unidentified object that is too well known to be suspicious. If we are well informed about Robert de Torigni’s first years as abbot of Le Mont Saint-Michel, it is because he or another monk told us what he did, in very specific detail. How he told us this is what interests me, and I refer to this ‘how’ as an unidentified object because, to my knowledge, no previous historian has reflected on the nature of this accessible and useful evidence. We know what it says. Do we really know what it means?

    What...

  10. THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING AMBIGUOUS: INNUENDO AND LEGERDEMAIN IN WILLIAM OF MALMESBURY’S GESTA REGUM AND GESTA PONTIFICUM ANGLORUM
    (pp. 75-102)
    Paul Antony Hayward

    One of the qualities that make William of Malmesbury’s twined histories Gesta regum and Gesta pontificum Anglorum so absorbing, but one that also bedevils the efforts of historians to make use of their contents, is their studied ambiguity.¹ These works are full of paradoxes – full of sudden shifts of perspective and dramatic changes of direction. There are many passages where the author sets out contrasting positions without committing himself to either side. Consider, for instance, his comments about the effects of King William I’s almsgiving, one of the most quoted passages in the Gesta regum. He begins with praise:

    Thus,...

  11. ST ANSELM, CHURCH REFORM, AND THE POLITICS OF ART
    (pp. 103-126)
    T. A. Heslop

    The late twelfth-century glass from the choir aisles and eastern transept arms of Canterbury cathedral is rightly famous on two counts: its superb design and execution and its conceptual ambition as a moralizing cycle, relating the Old to the New Testament and devising much else besides. Although most of the glass is lost, its subject matter is known from transcripts of the accompanying Latin verses, the earliest dating from the late thirteenth century.¹ These present in twelve windows a sequence of about seventy central New Testament subjects with more than 140 parallels (Fig. 1): a large, varied, and complex programme...

  12. THE DOMESDAY BOROUGHS REVISITED
    (pp. 127-150)
    Julian Munby

    Two blank folios in the Exchequer Domesday, before the counties of Hampshire (fol. 37) and Middlesex (fol. 126), are among the most intriguing and suggestive in the entire work. For they go to the heart of the vexed question of the treatment of boroughs in the great survey, tell us something of the difficulties facing the compiler, and are a silent reminder of why so many questions still remain after a century of profound scholarship on the subject. The borough was a central part of Maitland’s Domesday Book and Beyond (1897),¹ and was carefully considered by Adolphus Ballard in his...

  13. BUILDING STORIES: THE REPRESENTATION OF ARCHITECTURE IN THE BAYEUX EMBROIDERY
    (pp. 151-186)
    Elizabeth Carson Pastan

    Like the Bayeux Embroidery of the later eleventh century,¹ the incunabulum of 1493 known in English as the Nuremberg Chronicle has been the subject of many claims about its utility as a document of contemporary architectural practices.² On the one hand, there is the publisher Anton Koberger’s grandiose assertion that the 101 different sites it depicts will lead you to think that you are seeing these places ‘with your own eyes’.³ On the other hand, Koberger’s statement has to be qualified by the numerous instances of image recycling within the Chronicle.⁴ For example, the very same image of a cityscape...

  14. Back Matter
    (pp. 187-199)