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Anglo-Norman Studies 26

Anglo-Norman Studies 26: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003

Edited by John Gillingham
Volume: 26
Copyright Date: 2004
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 202
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt81v3r
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  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 26
    Book Description:

    The emphasis in this collection of recent work on the Anglo-Norman realm is particularly on narrative sources: Dudo, Vita Ædwardi Regis, monastic chronicle audiences in the Fens, the chronicles of Anjou, the Warenne view of the past - and much later sources for stereotypical images of the Normans. There are also papers analysing both charter and chronicle evidence in reconsiderations of the succession disputes following the deaths of William I and William II. Papers range geographically from Anjou to the Irish Sea zone. Contributors, from France and Germany as well as from Britain, Ireland and the US, are BERNARD S. BACHRACH, RICHARD BARBER, JULIA BARROW, CLARE DOWNHAM, VERONIQUE GAZEAU, JOHN GRASSI, ELISABETH VAN HOUTS, JENNIFER PAXTON, NEIL STREVETT, NEIL WRIGHT.

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-205-4
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. vii-viii)
    John Gillingham
  4. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. ix-xii)
  5. R. Allen Brown Memorial Lecture THE NORMAN CONQUEST AND THE MEDIA
    (pp. 1-20)
    Richard Barber

    Before I am thrown out of these august surroundings for excessive levity, there is a serious purpose in quoting this rhyme, from Eleanor and Herbert Farjeon’s Kings and Queens of England of 1932. It offers a stereotype: the Normans are the oppressors of the simple Anglo-Saxons, who are shut up and deprived of their liberty. It is a point of view typical of children’s history books of that period: but children’s books often tell us what their adult peers are thinking. This is pure popular tradition, prejudices, warts and all. It is not history; but it is a powerful myth....

  6. DUDO OF ST QUENTIN AND NORMAN MILITARY STRATEGY c.1000
    (pp. 21-36)
    Bernard S. Bachrach

    For almost a century and a half, scholars have questioned the historical accuracy of De Moribus et Actis primorum Normanniae ducum written by Dudo of St Quentin early in the eleventh century.¹ This work, which is sometimes referred to by scholars as Gesta Normannorum, is now widely recognized to be littered throughout with unreliable details in regard to political matters and this is the case especially in regard to the early history of the Norman ducal family.² Whether Dudo’s general failure to get the facts right, as many scholars believe, was intentional or whether his inaccuracies resulted from trying to...

  7. CLERGY IN THE DIOCESE OF HEREFORD IN THE ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CENTURIES
    (pp. 37-54)
    Julia Barrow

    In the 1140s Bishop Robert de Béthune of Hereford issued a charter adjudging two churches to the Norman abbey of Lire and its abbot Hildier who had come all the way to Hereford to press claims to them. After explaining the validity of Lire’s claim to the church of Fownhope, Robert went on to say ‘Similarly I grant to [Hildier] the church of Much Marcle, anciently subjected to Lire, in which in my time I found two priests, one having a concubine and the other not only having a concubine but also being a simoniac, which was recognised and proved...

  8. ENGLAND AND THE IRISH-SEA ZONE IN THE ELEVENTH CENTURY
    (pp. 55-74)
    Clare Downham

    Many historical studies have been written about Anglo-Irish relations in the years immediately after the English invasion of Ireland in 1169.¹ That the invasion should have an important place in research is understandable, given its long-term impact and its implications in recent historical and political debate.² In contrast, very few publications have focused on Anglo-Irish political interaction in the eleventh century.³ In this paper, I hope to draw more attention to this somewhat neglected field of enquiry.

    The emphasis of historical scholarship on the invasion and its aftermath has perhaps influenced the interpretation of earlier events. The issues in the ...

  9. LES ABBES BENEDICTINS DE LA NORMANDIE DUCALE
    (pp. 75-86)
    Véronique Gazeau

    Cet article constitue un résumé d’une partie du dossier présenté en vue de l’obtention de l’Habilitation à diriger des recherches en décembre 2002.¹ L’enquête sur les abbés bénédictins normands se propose d’être une large contribution aux recherches historiques relatives à la principauté normande pendant la période ducale (911–1204). Les ducs de Normandie, à la suite des souverains carolingiens dans la continuité desquels s’inscrit leur politique religieuse, restaurent le monachisme en relevant plusieurs maisons bénédictines au Xe siècle et au début du XIe siècle, Saint-Ouen de Rouen, Jumièges, Saint-Wandrille, Saint-Taurin d’Evreux, Le Mont-Saint-Michel peut-être, Fécamp et Cerisy. Le relais est...

  10. THE VITA ÆDWARDI REGIS: THE HAGIOGRAPHER AS INSIDER
    (pp. 87-102)
    J. L. Grassi

    In the preface to his second edition of the Vita, Frank Barlow has commented that ‘it has received little critical attention’ in recent years and that ‘its lack of a certain author and indisputable date makes it slightly disreputable, something to be acknowledged only with half-averted eyes’.¹ It is not quite certain that Barlow himself has looked the work straight in the eye. While emphasising the significance of the Life for our knowledge of the reign of Edward the Confessor,² he has entered reservations that seem somewhat to undermine his confidence in the work³ whose ‘evidence has to be used...

  11. THE WARENNE VIEW OF THE PAST, 1066–1203
    (pp. 103-122)
    Elisabeth van Houts

    This paper is concerned with an heiress, Isabelle of Warenne (c.1130–c.1203), a tombstone, a chronicle and various clusters of charters, which between them throw light on the Warenne view of the past.¹ The heiress Isabelle of Warenne was born in the 1130s as the great-granddaughter of William I of Warenne (d.1088), the family’s Norman ancestor and his Flemish wife Gundrada.² Isabella succeeded her father William III of Warenne after his death in the Holy Land in 1147 or 1148. Around this time she was married by King Stephen (1135–54) to his second son William of Blois, a lad...

  12. TEXTUAL COMMUNITIES IN THE ENGLISH FENLANDS: A LAY AUDIENCE FOR MONASTIC CHRONICLES?
    (pp. 123-138)
    Jennifer Paxton

    In the second half of the twelfth century a number of Benedictine houses in England compiled histories of their own communities. This trend was particularly pronounced in the Fenlands, where three important abbeys – Ely, Peterborough, and Ramsey – produced house-histories at almost exactly the same time. These house chronicles do not seem to have enjoyed wide circulation. The manuscripts of these texts seem to have stayed within the monastic precincts, and there is little or no sign of their being consulted by outsiders. Not unreasonably, most historians have assumed that these texts were intended primarily for the monks themselves,...

  13. 1088 – WILLIAM II AND THE REBELS
    (pp. 139-158)
    Richard Sharpe

    William Rufus celebrated Christmas for the first time as king at London.¹ No diploma from that occasion has preserved the names of the great men who attended, though Henry of Huntingdon mentions the names of the bishops present.² His most probable source may have been a diploma for Bishop Remigius of Lincoln, now lost but accessible to Henry at Lincoln. Last of those named (apart from Remigius himself, who would not have witnessed such a diploma but must be counted as Henry’s addition) was Odo, bishop of Bayeux. William Rufus had restored him to his earldom of Kent, and he...

  14. THE ANGLO-NORMAN CIVIL WAR OF 1101 RECONSIDERED
    (pp. 159-176)
    Neil Strevett

    In July of 1101, Robert Curthose, duke of Normandy and the eldest son of William the Conqueror, landed in England with the intention of challenging his younger brother, Henry I, for the English throne.¹ Though contemporaries recognised a good story when they saw one, modern historians have shown a reticence to consider the episode with only three detailed studies devoted to the campaign of 1101. The first came from E. A. Freeman in the nineteenth century, who in characteristically nationalist terms saw a ‘listless’ Curthose momentarily dazzled by the prospect of the English throne, with the English rallying to support...

  15. EPIC AND ROMANCE IN THE CHRONICLES OF ANJOU
    (pp. 177-190)
    Neil Wright

    In this paper I shall consider two anonymous twelfth-century Angevin chronicles, the Chronica de gestis consulum Andegauorum and the Gesta Ambaziensium dominorum.¹ My prime concern will be to identify new sources in these texts, through close reading of some relevant passages which will, I hope, shed light on various aspects of both the texts and their sources. One question raised will be the influence exerted by sources in the vernacular – the romance of my title – as well, as we shall see, as that exercised by Latin epic. This latter question will lead in a surprising direction, to an...