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Anglo-Norman Studies 34

Anglo-Norman Studies 34: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2011

Edited by David Bates
Volume: 34
Copyright Date: 2012
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 288
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.cttn3353
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  • Book Info
    Anglo-Norman Studies 34
    Book Description:

    The contributions collected in this volume demonstrate the full range and vitality of current work on the Anglo-Norman period in a variety of disciplines. Subjects include the fables on the Bayeux Tapestry, the piety of Earl Godwine, the feudal quota of the pre-1066 Archbishops of Canterbury, Geoffrey Malaterra's treatment of Roger the Great Count, mints and money in Anglo-Norman England, the church of Lastingham, and a reappraisal of Lanfranc as theologian. David Bates is Professorial Fellow, University of East Anglia. Contributors: Martin Allen, Henry Bainton, Nicholas Brooks, Jonathan Grove, Toivo Holopainen, Chris Lewis, Tom Licence, Marie-Agnès Lucas-Avenel, Christopher Norton and Stuart Harrison, Rebecca Slitt, Stephen D. White, Ann Williams.

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-971-8
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. ILLUSTRATIONS AND TABLES
    (pp. vi-viii)
  4. EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. ix-x)
    DAVID BATES
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xi-xiv)
  6. MINTS AND MONEY IN NORMAN ENGLAND
    (pp. 1-22)
    Martin Allen

    In 1066 England had a highly developed coinage, which was left almost untouched by the Norman Conquest, in the short term at least. The system documented by Domesday Book in 1086 is essentially that of Edward the Confessor in 1066, with large numbers of moneyers in dozens of urban centres minting silver pennies and making profits for the king and local magnates, lay and ecclesiastical. The moneyers paid fees to obtain their coin dies in London, and the designs on the dies were regularly changed to generate more income from the issue of coins to people who needed money of...

  7. LITERATE SOCIABILITY AND HISTORICAL WRITING IN LATER TWELFTH-CENTURY ENGLAND
    (pp. 23-40)
    Henry Bainton

    ‘In order to remember the deeds and the words and the conduct of the ancestors’, recommends Wace in the prologue to his Roman de Rou, ‘people should read out books and histories and stories at festivals.’¹ ‘Many things that happened long ago’, he goes on to say, ‘would have been forgotten if documents [escripture] had not been written and then read and recounted by clerks.’² As a vernacular commendation of the pedagogical value of history and of the written word, Wace’s comments are well known.³ However, his emphasis on the public staging of writing – on the use of written...

  8. THE ARCHBISHOPRIC OF CANTERBURY AND THE SO-CALLED INTRODUCTION OF KNIGHT-SERVICE INTO ENGLAND
    (pp. 41-62)
    Nicholas Brooks

    The core of this article is a commentary upon four pre-Conquest documents, which are printed in part or in full in the Appendix, pp. 60–62. The first (1) is the only surviving Anglo-Saxon archiepiscopal will, that of Archbishop Ælfric (995–1005),which was preserved at Abingdon; the other documents all come from the archive of Canterbury cathedral. Two of these (2 and 3) are from the pontificate of Archbishop Æthelnoth (1020–38), who was remembered at Canterbury particularly because he was the first archbishop to be elected from within the Christ Church community since the election of Archbishop wulfred in...

  9. LASTINGHAM AND THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE BENEDICTINE REVIVAL IN NORTHUMBRIA
    (pp. 63-104)
    Stuart Harrison and Christopher Norton

    At first sight the village church at Lastingham, set upon a hillock on the edge of the moors with the ground dropping away to the east, looks like a standard Norman parish church with later additions (Figure 1). The exterior has an eastern apse,preceded by a forebay, with Romanesque detailing: a string-course with billet and other abstract ornament beneath round-headed windows. The aisles have tracery windows of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century date, and the tower is fifteenth century. It could pass muster as any ordinary parish church; but further inspection reveals something very rare. The apse is two-storied, a lower central...

  10. ‘LANFRANC OF BEC’ AND BERENGAR OF TOURS
    (pp. 105-122)
    Toivo J. Holopainen

    This article deals with a famous but obscure issue in eleventh-century intellectual history: the debate between Lanfranc of Bec and Berengar of Tours about the interpretation of the Eucharistic doctrine. The main focus will be on the treatise which is taken to be Lanfranc’s key contribution in the debate, De corpore et sanguine Domini (c. 1063).¹ As for Berengar, I shall leave aside his main work, the reply to Lanfranc known as Rescriptum contra Lanfrannum,² and from his earlier work I will be concerned only with what is needed to create the context for Lanfranc’s contribution.³ The reason for the...

  11. THE INVENTION OF THE MANOR IN NORMAN ENGLAND
    (pp. 123-150)
    C. P. Lewis

    There is more in this article about the Latin word manerium than about the thing it described, the manor, but I shall be using the early history of the word as a way of getting at what was in people’s heads when they wrote manerium in the later eleventh century and at what realities they saw, or thought they saw, on the ground.¹ Words, concepts and things are not the same, as Susan Reynolds has taught us, and historians are well advised to begin by separating them. I would thus gloss David Bates’s injunction that anyone intent on comparing pre-...

  12. HERBERT LOSINGA’S TRIP TO ROME AND THE BISHOPRIC OF BURY ST EDMUNDS
    (pp. 151-168)
    Tom Licence

    Scholars of ecclesiastical politics in the reign of William Rufus know that, in his thirteen years on the throne, he had major disagreements with three of his bishops.¹ In 1088–91, he clashed with William of Saint-Calais, bishop of Durham from 1080 to 1096. In February 1094, he fell out with Herbert Losinga, bishop of Thetford since 1091,and finally, at about that time, he also fell to quarrelling with Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury. Fortunately, two of the conflicts were described in detail. We therefore know that the bishop of Durham behaved suspiciously during the rebellion of 1088 by ignoring the...

  13. LE RÉCIT DE GEOFFROI MALATERRA OU LA LÉGITIMATION DE ROGER, GRAND COMTE DE SICILE
    (pp. 169-192)
    Marie-Agnès Lucas-Avenel

    This article considers the way in which Geoffrey Malaterra legitimizes the careers of the Hauteville family and, above all, of Roger the Great Count and his conquest of the island of Sicily. In analysing Geoffrey’s relationship with Roger, which is seen as having been a close one, the author suggests that contrary to the received view that Geoffrey was a Norman, he might in fact have originally been from the region of Châteaudun or the county of Perche, and therefore was probably a protégé of Hildebert of Lavardin or Ivo of Chartres. Emphasizing that Geoffrey wrote on Roger’s oders and...

  14. THE TWO DEATHS OF WILLIAM LONGSWORD: WACE, WILLIAM OF MALMESBURY AND THE NORMAN PAST
    (pp. 193-208)
    Rebecca L. Slitt

    William Longsword, the second duke of Normandy, was a mythic figure for the generations of Normans who came after him. He was the first duke to succeed to the position, the first to be born a Christian, and an expert at manoeuvring in the difficult political environment of northern France in the tenth century.¹ Further enhancing his reputation was the fact that he was tragically assassinated in 942, betrayed by someone supposedly offering him friendship. Thanks to this convergence of traits, in the first two hundred years after his death William Longsword almost achieved the status of a martyr saint...

  15. THE BEASTS WHO TALK ON THE BAYEUX EMBROIDERY: THE FABLES REVISITED
    (pp. 209-236)
    Stephen D. White

    Just as the central frieze of the Bayeux Embroidery depicts Harold dux Anglorum and his milites leaving a second-story banquet hall at Bosham, boarding ship and sailing out to sea, the lower border shows the first in an uninterrupted series of Aesopian fables, the last of which appears just as the English reach land and are captured by a lord called Guy (W 4–8).² Previous writers on the embroidery are generally agreed that the series includes eight fables, referred to here as the ‘canonical’ eight to distinguish them from other fables also represented, but rarely if ever noticed.³ They...

  16. THE PIETY OF EARL GODWINE
    (pp. 237-256)
    Ann Williams

    Modern scholarship has not looked kindly on Earl Godwine.¹ Allen Brown called him ‘a parvenu who by some means won the favour of Cnut’, adding that ‘unscrupulous aggrandisement’ was his chief characteristic, while Donald Matthew presented his whole family as ‘ambitious upstarts’ among their warring peers.² Similar judgements appear in Robin Fleming’s description of Godwine and his kin as ‘a family of highly competent and slightly unscrupulous earls’ whose machinations fatally weakened the English kingdom, and in Eric John’s even more vituperative judgement: ‘a cancer upon the body politic that had to be cut out’.³ At best, modern historians tend...

  17. Back Matter
    (pp. 257-269)