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The Fifteenth Century X

The Fifteenth Century X: Parliament, Personalities and Power. Papers Presented to Linda S. Clark

Edited by HANNES KLEINEKE
Volume: 10
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 265
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.cttn33rq
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  • Book Info
    The Fifteenth Century X
    Book Description:

    Linda S. Clark is a distinguished scholar of fifteenth-century England, best known for her important contribution to the study of the late medieval English parliament. She has served as general editor of 'The Fifteenth Century' since 2003. This special volume in the series marks her four decades of work for the History of Parliament Trust. As is appropriate, its essays focus above all on Parliament and the personalities that served in its chambers, but they also illuminate a wider range of themes that have long concerned students of the later middle ages, including the lawlessness of the gentry and nobility, the acquisition and management of their estates, and their self-expression in pageantry and legend. Other social groups, ranging from the mercantile élite of the city of London and their Italian trading partners to England's common soldiers, also make an appearance. Several of the papers collected here have a geographical focus in London and East Anglia, but other regions are also represented. The collection thus pays tribute to the breadth of Dr Clark's contribution to the field, both in her own writing, and in her long-standing commitment to facilitate the publication of the original research of others. Contributors: A. J. Pollard, Simon Payling, Charles Moreton, Colin Richmond, J. L. Bolton, James Ross, Carole Rawcliffe, Elizabeth Danbury, Matthew Davies, Hannes Kleineke, David Grummitt, Caroline M. Barron

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-983-1
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. xi-xii)
    H.W.K.
  6. PREFACE
    (pp. xiii-xv)
    Hannes Kleineke
  7. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xvi-xvi)
  8. THE PEOPLE AND PARLIAMENT IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLAND
    (pp. 1-16)
    A.J. Pollard

    A fuller understanding of the participation of relatively humble people in the politics of the kingdom¹ and the importance of the public realm² in the fifteenth century has emerged in recent years. In this body of work, however, little attention has been paid to the specific question of the engagement of the people with parliament. A broad assumption remains that this was one arena from which they were excluded. After all, we seem to have no better authority for this than Bishop John Russell of Lincoln, chancellor of England in 1483. As he intended to declare to the Lords that...

  9. ‘A BEEST ENVENYMED THOROUGH … COVETIZE’: AN IMPOSTER PILGRIM AND THE DISPUTED DESCENT OF THE MANOR OF DODFORD, 1306–1481
    (pp. 17-38)
    Simon Payling

    The dispute over the valuable manor of Dodford, a few miles west of Northampton, was intermittently in agitation for 175 years.¹ Its longevity recommends it as a subject of study, as does the survival of a narrative statement, drawn up in the late 1470s, outlining the case of one of the disputants and providing some curious details about what the compiler of the narrative professed to take as the origin of the manor’s disputed ownership.² Such narratives, more extended than simple statements of title, are infrequent survivals. This one, drawn up to answer a lost declaration of a claim, is...

  10. HENRY INGLOSE: A HARD MAN TO PLEASE
    (pp. 39-52)
    Charles Moreton and Colin Richmond

    The first few decades of the fifteenth century were glorious ones for English arms in France, giving the landed classes the opportunity to follow a traditional and honourable calling and to win fame, if not fortune, across the Channel. In some cases fortunes were made, and successful soldiers like the well-known East Anglian knight, Sir John Fastolf, invested their newly acquired wealth in land at home. Whether Fastolf received a good return from his considerable investments is a matter for debate but he was far from an uninterested landowner. He kept a close eye on the management of his estates...

  11. LONDON MERCHANTS AND THE BORROMEI BANK IN THE 1430s: THE ROLE OF LOCAL CREDIT NETWORKS
    (pp. 53-74)
    J.L. Bolton

    Italian merchants were not liked in fifteenth-century England, if contemporary propaganda is to be believed. They were accused of all manner of commercial and financial crimes, from selling their imports dear and buying English goods for export cheaply to rigging international exchange transactions so that both the balance of trade and payments was in their favour and bullion drained from the land.¹ If this was generally true of late-medieval attitudes, then it was even more the case between 1435 and 1439–40. The Burgundian decision to change sides in the Hundred Years War and, by the Treaty of Arras of...

  12. ‘MISCHIEVIOUSLY SLEWEN’: JOHN, LORD SCROPE, THE DUKES OF NORFOLK AND SUFFOLK, AND THE MURDER OF HENRY HOWARD IN 1446
    (pp. 75-96)
    James Ross

    Murders of members of the gentry committed by peers, or on the orders of peers, were not common in the later middle ages. The few that did occur tended to generate much contemporary comment, such as the notorious murder of the westcountry lawyer Nicholas Radford by Sir Thomas Courtenay, son and heir of the earl of Devon, in 1455.¹ The murder of Henry Howard, esquire, by servants of John, Lord Scrope of Masham, in 1446, however, is almost unknown to historians, not least because there is no reference to it in any chronicle, or in the early Paston letters; this...

  13. A FIFTEENTH-CENTURY MEDICUS POLITICUS: JOHN SOMERSET, PHYSICIAN TO HENRY VI
    (pp. 97-120)
    Carole Rawcliffe

    At first glance, the return of John Somerset as a shire knight for Middlesex to the parliament of 1442 seems unsurprising, if not predictable. Although, unlike his fellow representative, Thomas Charlton, he did not come from an established county family, he had occupied the manor of Ruislip as a life tenant of the crown since 1437, had served on the local bench for just over two years, and had already acquired the extensive estate in and around Osterley where he was to build a ‘great messuage’.² And if these unimpeachable local connexions failed to convince the electors of Middlesex, his...

  14. ‘DOMINE SALVUM FAC REGEM’: THE ORIGIN OF ‘GOD SAVE THE KING’ IN THE REIGN OF HENRY VI
    (pp. 121-142)
    Elizabeth Danbury

    ‘God save the king’ is by far the best known of all royal acclamations in the English language. The origins of the phrase lie in the first part of the tenth verse of psalm 19 in the Vulgate text. It first appeared in Latin as a royal motto in the reign of Henry VI, was adopted by his successors and, after its translation into English, was inserted at the foot of royal proclamations, incorporated into the coronation service and eventually reached its apotheosis as the refrain of the national anthem. This paper aims to investigate certain aspects of the origin...

  15. ‘MONUMENTS OF HONOUR’: CLERKS, HISTORIES AND HEROES IN THE LONDON LIVERY COMPANIES
    (pp. 143-166)
    Matthew Davies

    In celebrating Linda Clark’s contribution to the study of late medieval history, it seems fitting to write something which reflects both on the importance of archives, and on the lives of individuals in shaping our perspectives on the medieval past. This essay seeks to look at some of the ways in which the city of London guilds (or livery companies as they became known) developed a sense of their own histories, and in particular at the emergence of heroic figures within guild and civic culture, from the fourteenth to the early seventeenth centuries. In doing so, one is rightly conscious...

  16. THE EAST ANGLIAN PARLIAMENTARY ELECTIONS OF 1461
    (pp. 167-188)
    Hannes Kleineke

    In the aftermath of the decisive battle of Towton, fought on Palm Sunday (29 March) 1461, King Edward IV remained at York for several weeks, before moving north to Durham and Newcastle. Only in May did he set out for the south-east and the capital once more, but at a leisurely pace and taking in some of the western midlands. He had thus only reached Manchester when on 23 May he issued writs for a parliament to be held at Westminster in July, probably with a view to put in place a permanent constitutional settlement. The parliament called in Henry...

  17. CHANGING PERCEPTIONS OF THE SOLDIER IN LATE MEDIEVAL ENGLAND
    (pp. 189-202)
    David Grummitt

    In the summer of 1514 a curious case came before the mayor’s court in Norwich. It concerned a Lancashire priest, Adelston Attylsey, who had come to Norwich to serve in the household of Sir Philip Calthorpe. Attylsey had got his hands on ‘an Englysshe boke in print’, entitled Thordre and behauyoure of the right honourable Erle of Surrey tresour and Marshal of Englande ayenst the kynge of Scottes and the Inuasions howe the same kynge at the Batayle of Brakston was slayne by the sayd erle. This was an account of Surrey’s famous victory at Flodden printed by the king’s...

  18. THOMAS MORE, THE LONDON CHARTERHOUSE AND RICHARD III
    (pp. 203-214)
    Caroline M. Barron

    The summer of 1535 saw the first high-profile martyrs executed for the Catholic cause in England. In March 1534 Parliament had passed the Act of Succession which recognised the validity of the king’s marriage (in January 1533) to Anne Boleyn, and this was followed in November that year by the Act of Supremacy which acknowledged the king as supreme head on earth of the Church of England. Subjects were required to take oaths accepting both acts, or to suffer the penalties for treason. Thomas More, seeing the way the wind was blowing, had resigned the chancellorship in May 1532; in...

  19. INDEX
    (pp. 215-234)
  20. TABULA GRATULATORIA
    (pp. 235-236)
  21. Back Matter
    (pp. 237-243)