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Foreign Policy and the Developing Nation

Foreign Policy and the Developing Nation

RICHARD BUTWELL Editor
HENRY BIENEN
RUPERT EMERSON
IVO
ROSALIND FEIERABEND
BENJAMIN HIGGINS
LLOYD JENSEN
WILSON CAREY McWILLIAMS
GAYL D. NESS
Copyright Date: 1969
Pages: 244
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130j1rf
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  • Book Info
    Foreign Policy and the Developing Nation
    Book Description:

    Eight well-known political scientists, economists, and sociologists here explore the interrelationships between the various levels of economic strength and political stability attended by newly emerged nations and the formulation of their foreign policies. These essays provide testimony not only to the importance of these problems, but also to contributions that can be made by various methodological approaches by scholars from the different social sciences. Contributing to the volume are Rupert Emerson, Benjamin Higgins, Gayl Ness, Ivo and Rosalind Feierabend, Henry Bienen, Lloyd Jensen, and Wilson C. McWilliams.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6235-5
    Subjects: Political Science, Sociology

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[iv])
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. [v]-[vi])
  3. INTRODUCTION CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT
    (pp. 1-10)
    RICHARD BUTWELL

    THE SYSTEM of international relations that existed on the eve of World War II was altered considerably in the years which followed that costly conflict. Before the war what was called “international” relations was essentially the relations among the countries of Europe, where the nation-state had developed. The United States and Japan, both located outside Europe, had been drawn into the system and were, as a matter of fact, the major belligerents in the Pacific phase of the war between 1941 and 1945. The other major powers, however, were European states (Britain, France, Germany, and the Soviet Union), and large...

  4. CHAPTER ONE POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT AND FOREIGN POLICY
    (pp. 11-40)
    WILSON CAREY McWILLIAMS

    DE TOCQUEVILLE wrote, “A new science of politics is needed for a new world.”¹ In our time, change has created what seems more a bewildering series of unfamiliar worlds than a single new one, and it is no surprise that political scientists have felt the same need. Yet they have not always understood, as de Tocqueville did, that a new science must return to old questions, that the perennial is never more important than in the transition from the obsolete to the untried.

    No science of politics is possible without a definition of “the political,” yet no satisfactory definition exists...

  5. CHAPTER TWO FOREIGN POLICY AND SOCIAL CHANGE
    (pp. 41-66)
    GAYL D. NESS

    THE RELATION between large, superordinate states and small, subordinate states provides the most useful setting for the analysis of the relation between foreign policy and social change.¹ The argument for the use of this type of highly simplified dyadic model with considerable power imbalance is largely a strategic one. Social change is a complex process that is shaped by many forces. Normally forces internal to the society will be more important than external forces in determining the speed and direction of social change. Further, the external forces that are important seldom derive from a single society. They are more often...

  6. CHAPTER THREE FOREIGN POLICY, THE MILITARY, AND DEVELOPMENT: MILITARY ASSISTANCE AND POLITICAL CHANGE IN AFRICA
    (pp. 67-112)
    HENRY BIENEN

    POLITICS AND ECONOMICS in the developing countries can be studied as part of international affairs.¹ There has, in fact, been a large literature on colonialism and its inheritances. And those who focus on imperialism or neocolonialism have analyzed the impact of external forces on the societies of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. More recently, studies of modernization have argued that there are important connections between national political systems and the international system, and the idea of a transnational politics has emerged. Some studies argue that nonindustrialized or traditional societies are changing under the impact of modern, industrial systems; their concern...

  7. CHAPTER FOUR FOREIGN ECONOMIC POLICY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
    (pp. 113-134)
    BENJAMIN HIGGINS

    FOUR ASPECTS of foreign economic policy are of importance for the development of underdeveloped countries: foreign aid, foreign trade, stabilization, and encouragement (or discouragement) of private investment.

    Foreign aid has been much more in the public eye in recent years than any of the other three types of policy, and controversy concerning it has been much keener. It might also be said that thinking about it has been much more confused. For this state of affairs social scientists are partly to blame. There is little truly sophisticated literature on the theory of foreign aid, and it could hardly be claimed...

  8. CHAPTER FIVE LEVEL OF DEVELOPMENT AND INTERNATION BEHAVIOR
    (pp. 135-188)
    IVO K., ROSALIND L. FEIERABEND, Frank W. Scanland III and John Stuart Chambers

    THIS DISCUSSION concerns the relationship between levels of socioeconomic development achieved by nations of the world and their behavior within the international political system.¹ The study includes 84 nations (all independent polities in 1948), which are scrutinized for the period following World War II. The variables employed derive generally from the period 1948–1962. The discussion is based on a consideration of 27 variables in all, giving the study a global scope although a limited historical perspective.

    A major portion of the analysis centers on three categories of internation behavior: hostile transactions, amicable transactions, and degree of involvement in the...

  9. CHAPTER SIX LEVELS OF POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT AND INTERSTATE CONFLICT IN SOUTH ASIA
    (pp. 189-208)
    LLOYD JENSEN

    MOST RESEARCH on the relationship between development and foreign policy has focused on the question of how the foreign policy of one of the larger states, usually the United States, can facilitate modernization in the less developed area.¹ Little attention has been given to the link between the level of development of a state and how it behaves in the international system, in spite of the fact that such a link is just as crucial in determining the goals and purposes of development. Does internal development, for example, tend to induce international conflict, or might it play an ameliorative role?...

  10. CHAPTER SEVEN AMERICAN INFLUENCE IN DEVELOPED AND UNDERDEVELOPED COUNTRIES
    (pp. 209-236)
    RUPERT EMERSON

    TO BE A GREAT POWER, and even more a super power, is to be concerned with what goes on in every corner of the globe. To be concerned is to seek to influence the turn of events wherever possible in order to secure a favorable outcome, or at least to forestall an unfavorable one. With the shrinking of time and space for both peaceful and belligerent purposes in the contemporary world and with the transition to independence of almost all the colonial territories, the interest of the super powers more literally embraces every corner of the globe than was feasible...

  11. Back Matter
    (pp. 237-237)