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Making Good Communities Better

Making Good Communities Better

IRWIN T. SANDERS
Copyright Date: 1953
Edition: 2
Pages: 208
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130j4k9
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  • Book Info
    Making Good Communities Better
    Book Description:

    Irwin T. Sanders has translated his own experience as a social scientist into a practical, easy-to-read guide to community improvement. An impressive array of additional experts has teamed up with him to supply selected guideposts on twenty-one special problems in community organization.

    This popular handbook has been called by many civic workers the most practical, down-to-earth tool they have known for community engineering. Issued in two editions with a total of seven printings, it is now republished in a convenient, paper-bound form containing the complete text of the 1953 revision.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6424-3
    Subjects: Political Science, Sociology

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. v-vi)
    Irwin T. Sanders
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. PART I WHAT MAKES A GOOD COMMUNITY: FOUR TRAITS
    (pp. 1-7)

    WHY DO SOME communities leave a good impression with us when we drive through them, while other towns remain a dot on our road maps? All of us are attracted by well-kept lawns, wide streets, impressive public buildings, modern stores, and clean factories. If we look behind the scenes in a good community, we find a number of traits which result in an attractive, prosperous appearance. A listing of just four of these traits

    1. Leaders that see the whole community,

    2. A collective way of solving problems,

    3. A strong sense of community loyalty, and

    4. A basically a...

  5. PART II HOW COMMUNITIES SHOW DIFFERENCES: FIVE WAYS
    (pp. 8-26)

    CALIFORNIA farmers would laugh at a newcomer from the Corn Belt who tried to set up a replica of his Midwest farm in the belief that he could use the same methods to grow the same crops that he had grown back in Iowa. “The soils and climates are different,” they would tell their new neighbor.

    It is just as ridiculous for us to expect that all of the methods used by successful community leaders in one part of the country would work as well in another part. Our social soils and cultural climates are also different.

    Before we begin...

  6. PART III HOW TO PROMOTE A CIVIC PROGRAM: FIVE STAGES
    (pp. 27-59)

    A WARM-HEARTED club president found herself slightly at sea when she read over the suggestions I had to make in this part of the book. Her remarks showed that she had missed the point of this whole section since she did not know just what questions it was supposed to answer. Her concentration had been so wholeheartedly on her Tulip Civic Club that she had forgotten the community. Once properly briefed, she reread the material and became an enthusiastic champion of the five-stage approach in promoting a program.

    The pointers I gave my friend may help other readers, too.

    1....

  7. PART IV HOW TO MAKE OUR GROUP EFFECTIVE: SEVEN AREAS
    (pp. 60-84)

    AN ORGANIZED group is a great deal like a car. It consists primarily of a number of parts put together according to some plan. It exists—or should exist—not as an end in itself but to get something done. Such a group, like a car, has to have power or drive to move it along. When it moves, it has to head in some direction, have some goal or destination. Then, too, it has a braking system which may work too well, rather well, or not well enough. An organization, like an automobile which gets out of control, can...

  8. PART V OUR PHlLOSOPHY OF CIVIC SERVICE: FIVE QUESTIONS
    (pp. 85-99)

    MUCH OF THE emphasis of this handbook has been upon techniques, ways of getting the job done. But techniques of themselves are sterile. When used by the ignorant and uninformed, they may prove dangerous; when used by the selfish and unscrupulous, they may prove vicious. They become community assets only when they are employed intelligently by civic leaders who are genuinely interested in giving service.

    It becomes necessary, therefore, that we who are engaged in community activities should bring to our tasks a mature philosophy of community service. Of course, we cannot adopt such a philosophy ready-made from someone else,...

  9. PART VI PROCEDURES FOR CIVIC LEADERS: 20 GUIDEPOSTS
    (pp. 100-198)

    IT HAS BEEN a great temptation for me to make this handbook serve the same purpose as theBook of Household Hintswhich tells with clarity and by use of diagrams how to put in a stem washer to stop a steady trickle from a faucet. But with that type of book, helpful though it may be, we become at best a tinkerer. Indeed, our tinkering sometimes makes the plumber’s bill much higher than it would have been, had we called him in the first place.

    So it is with social relations. There is a complexity to them that makes...

  10. TOPICAL INDEX
    (pp. 199-199)