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International Aid and National Decision: Development Programs in Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia

International Aid and National Decision: Development Programs in Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia

LEON GORDENKER
Copyright Date: 1976
Pages: 218
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x0rx5
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  • Book Info
    International Aid and National Decision: Development Programs in Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia
    Book Description:

    In more than one hundred developing countries, international organizations continuously offer practical assistance for economic advancement and social change-assistance that in some cases forms a substantial part of national programs. This book examines international aid in three countries-Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia-in order to ascertain how assisting organizations exert influence on member governments.

    Professor Gordenker draws on interviews, information usually inaccessible to observers, and his own direct field observation of programs established by the United Nations' system of organizations in the three countries during the late 1960s, immediately after their independence from British administration. This period witnessed sharp changes in national development policies and the political turmoil produced by the Rhodesian revolt. The author analyzes in detail the creation, bureaucratic consideration, and execution of important projects. His conclusions cast doubt on the existence of a reliable process by which international organizations may influence national governments, and he explains why such doubt is well-founded.

    Originally published in 1976.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-7226-8
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. PREFACE
    (pp. xi-xviii)
    L.G.
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xix-2)
    L.G.
  7. 1. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION AND FIELD OPERATIONS
    (pp. 3-51)

    The constant, even frenetic, operation of several hundred international institutions of diverse models has so seeped into international relations that it is both taken for granted and regarded as an essential element by national governments. Even though few persons anywhere, and these sometimes reluctantly, pay much attention to this ceaseless, beneficially intended activity, it nevertheless concerns the general welfare and relates with special intensity to the poorer parts of the world.

    Promotion of the general welfare—the provision of varied services to the people of the world—in one way or another now preoccupies most of the personnel and takes...

  8. 2. STRUCTURAL COUNTERPARTS
    (pp. 52-84)

    The process of securing assistance from an international organization involves a national governmental hierarchy and the counterpart hierarchies of one or several international organizations. These hierarchies reflect the modes of operation thought appropriate by the founders of the international organizations and by the national governments. The original approaches were set forth in formal, legal documents that emerged from the policy-making negotiations of the international organizations. But elaborations of these approaches emerged in practice and became the basis, and to a considerable extent the boundary markers, of the field programs. This chapter therefore begins with a consideration of the formally designed...

  9. 3. INFLUENCE: PROJECTS
    (pp. 85-118)

    The operations of the administrative structures in international agencies and those of governments receiving aid helps to establish a process of mutual influence. Elements of this influence process relate to specific development projects that receive international support. Such projects vary greatly in subject matter and in degree of involvement by international agencies and governments. It would be impossible to develop a general statement of this influence process so as to give specific weight to each example of development projects. Yet some insights into the process and its operation may be found in specific case material. This chapter will use examples...

  10. 4. INFLUENCE: ADVICE AND CRISIS
    (pp. 119-149)

    With the exception of loans from the World Bank system, the primary means by which all international organization projects aid governments with economic development is advice and compilation and analysis of specialized information. It is therefore an effort to introduce new technology or to make more efficient the existing methods of economic production and social administration. The advice proffered generally has to do with problems that have been defined by means of interactions among governments and international organizations over a considerable period of time. This process, discussed in Chapter 3, is presumed to be a means of keeping the character...

  11. 5. AN INTERNATIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUMENT
    (pp. 150-182)

    Dag Hammarskjöld once said, “In the field of economic and social policy, and of guidance and assistance to the underdeveloped areas, . . . the United Nations is in the first place to be regarded as an international administrative instrument, complementing the national administrations.”¹ A decade later, field observation in East and Central Africa indicated that the activities of the UN system had not changed in kind. The phrase, “an international administrative instrument,” continued accurately to characterize what could be observed. It provides a base from which conclusions, related to the hypotheses and propositions of Chapter 1, can be drawn....

  12. INDEX
    (pp. 183-190)
  13. Back Matter
    (pp. 191-198)