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The Politics of the Developing Areas

The Politics of the Developing Areas

GABRIEL A. ALMOND
JAMES S. COLEMAN
JAMES S. COLEMAN
LUCIAN W. PYE
MYRON WEINER
DANKWART A. RUSTOW
GEORGE I. BLANKSTEN
GABRIEL A. ALMOND
Copyright Date: 1960
Pages: 608
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x19q7
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  • Book Info
    The Politics of the Developing Areas
    Book Description:

    A pioneering venture, this book is the first major effort toward a valid comparison of the political systems of Asia, Africa, the Near East, and Latin America.

    After establishing a theoretical framework based on a functional approach to comparative politics, the authors apply their scheme to Southeast Asia (Lucian W. Pye), South Asia (Myron Weiner), SubSaharan Africa (James S. Coleman), the Near East (Dankwart Rustow), and Latin America (George I. Blanksten). In each area they survey the political background, the nature and function of political, governmental, and authoritative structures, the processes of change and means of political integration. The contributors have performed an extraordinarily difficult feat of classification, description, synthesis, and analysis in what promises to be a book of seminal importance in comparative politics.

    Originally published in 1970.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-6697-7
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. v-vi)
    Frederick S. Dunn

    This book sets out to do two things. The first is to construct a theoretical framework that makes possible, for the first time, a comparative method of analysis for political systems of all kinds. The second is to offer a comparative analysis of the political systems of those areas of the world in which dramatic social and political changes are taking place—Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

    The first of these objectives is covered by Professor Almond in his introductory essay on “A Functional Approach to Comparative Politics.” This reflects the very large amount of thought and invention that have...

  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-x)
    Gabriel A. Almond
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. xi-2)
  5. INTRODUCTION: A FUNCTIONAL APPROACH TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS
    (pp. 3-64)
    GABRIEL A. ALMOND

    This book is the first effort to compare the political systems of the “developing” areas, and to compare them systematically according to a common set of categories. To accomplish this it has been necessary to experiment with the conceptual vocabulary of political science. The old rubrics served us fairly well during the long era of political dominance of the Western European culture area. As long as scholars carried in the backs of their minds the history and anthropology of the area, the gross changes in the functional characteristics of governmental institutions which occurred in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries placed...

  6. 1. THE POLITICS OF Southeast Asia
    (pp. 65-152)
    LUCIAN W. PYE

    There is a quality of newness about Southeast Asia. The very term “Southeast Asia” came into common usage only with World War II and the creation of the South-East Asia Command. The end of colonialism and the rise of Communist China has caused the world to take a new interest in tropical Asia. The sense of the new and the contemporary stems also from the region being composed of newly emergent countries with youthful leaders who are striving to bring their peoples out of the old world of traditionalism and colonialism and into the modern world. The quality of newness...

  7. 2. THE POLITICS OF South Asia
    (pp. 153-246)
    MYRON WEINER

    South Asia has been rightfully called a “subcontinent.” It is massive in its area and population, prominent in its geographical position, and overwhelming in its problems. The subcontinent, consisting of India, Pakistan, Ceylon, and the secluded Himalayan states to the north—Nepal, Bhutan, and Sikkim—is a thousand-mile projection, dividing the Indian Ocean and the land mass of southern Asia in two. Older images of the region—elephants and snakes, maharajas and Nizams, fakirs and spiritualism, sola topees and sahibs, non-violence and Gandhi, untouchables and Brahmans—are rapidly being replaced with new images—socialism and neutralism, political disorder and violence,...

  8. 3. THE POLITICS OF Sub-Saharan Africa
    (pp. 247-368)
    JAMES S. COLEMAN

    In its geographical features, Africa is strikingly unique among the great continental masses of the earth’s surface. Among the several unusual characteristics setting it apart from other continents, five stand out: the massive Sahara Desert, the world’s largest arid waste, which stretches without a break from the Atlantic to the Red Sea and is nowhere less than a thousand miles wide; the historically impenetrable coastline, virtually devoid of natural harbors and throughout its vast length characterized by strong off-shore winds, sand bars, and inhospitable deserts or mangrove swamp-forests; its tropical character—squarely straddling the equator, three-quarters of its huge bulk...

  9. 4. THE POLITICS OF The Near East: SOUTH WEST ASIA AND NORTHERN AFRICA
    (pp. 369-454)
    DANKWART A. RUSTOW

    The pervasive instability of the Near Eastern region not only manifests itself in wars, revolutions, riots, and assassinations but seems to extend to the very delimitation and even the name of the area. The terminological confusion—Near East, Middle East, or NearandMiddle East—is of little significance, and I shall without further apology give preference to the term “Near East.” But the uncertainty about the region’s boundaries is no mere accident. Unlike the Americas, Australia, or the Indian subcontinent, the Near East is not set off from neighboring regions by vast oceans or impassable mountains. On the contrary,...

  10. 5. THE POLITICS OF Latin America
    (pp. 455-531)
    GEORGE I. BLANKSTEN

    Scholars in the United States generally use the term “Latin America” to embrace the twenty sovereign countries which have joined with the United States in the Organization of American States. Thus used, the term excludes not only the political units in the Western Hemisphere lying north of Mexico, but also Puerto Rico and the British, French, and Dutch possessions in the region.

    It is sometimes convenient to think of the twenty states of Latin America as falling into two major geographic categories. The first of these, the continent of South America, contains Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru,...

  11. CONCLUSION: THE POLITICAL SYSTEMS OF THE DEVELOPING AREAS
    (pp. 532-576)
    JAMES S. COLEMAN

    The purpose of this final chapter is to summarize briefly the modal characteristics of the political systems covered in this survey, to analyze the range of variation among these systems, and, where possible, to suggest propositions regarding relationships and developmental patterns in the process of modernization.

    It is important at the outset not only to make the analytical distinction between society and polity, but also to be explicit regarding the concept of “modernity” as used herein. Amodern societyis characterized, among other things, by a comparatively high degree of urbanization, widespread literacy, comparatively high per capita income, extensive geographical...

  12. APPENDIX
    (pp. 577-582)
  13. INDEX
    (pp. 583-592)
  14. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. 593-594)
  15. Back Matter
    (pp. 595-596)