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The Tempest

The Tempest

William Shakespeare
Fully annotated, with an Introduction, by Burton Raffel
With an essay by Harold Bloom
Copyright Date: 2006
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 192
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1njkxr
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  • Book Info
    The Tempest
    Book Description:

    Shakespeare's valedictory play is also one of his most poetical and magical. The story involves the spirit Ariel, the savage Caliban, and Prospero, the banished Duke of Milan, now a wizard living on a remote island who uses his magic to shipwreck a party of ex-compatriots.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-13830-6
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ABOUT THIS BOOK
    (pp. vii-xiv)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xv-xxx)

    First performed, so far as we know, in 1611, and probably written either in that year or in 1610–1611,The Tempestis very likely the last play that Shakespeare wrote entirely on his own.Henry VIIIhas been dated from 1612–1613, andThe Two Noble Kinsmenfrom 1613, but the latter play was written with John Fletcher, and the former (if it is, as generally conjectured, a collaborative effort) with an undetermined writer or writers.Cardenio,1613, and fairly clearly drawn from Miguel de Cervantes’sDon Quijote,is known to have been written with Fletcher, but the play...

  5. SOME ESSENTIALS OF THE SHAKESPEAREAN STAGE
    (pp. xxxi-xxxiv)

    There was noscenery(backdrops, flats, and so on).

    Compared to today’s elaborate, high-tech productions, the Elizabethan stage had fewon-stageprops. These were mostly handheld: a sword or dagger, a torch or candle, a cup or flask. Larger props, such as furniture, were used sparingly.

    Costumes (some of which were upper-class castoffs, belonging to the individual actors) were elaborate. As in most premodern and very hierarchical societies, clothing was the distinctive mark of who and what a person was.

    What the actorsspoke,accordingly, contained both the dramatic and narrative material we have come to expect in a theater...

  6. The Tempest
    (pp. 1-136)

    MasterBoatswain!

    BoatswainHere, master. What cheer?¹

    MasterGood.² Speak to the mariners. Fall to’t,³ yarely,⁴ or we run ourselves aground. Bestir,⁵ bestir.

    BoatswainHeigh,⁶ my hearts,⁷ cheerly,⁸ cheerly, my hearts! Yare,⁹ yare! Take in10the topsail.11Tend12to th’ master’s whistle.(to the storm) Blow till thou burst thy wind, if room enough.13

    AlonsoGood boatswain, have care. Where’s the master? Play the men.14

    BoatswainI pray15now, keep16below.

    AntonioWhere is the master, boson?

    BoatswainDo you not hear him? You mar17our labor,18keep19your cabins. You do20assist the storm.

    GonzaloNay, good21be patient.

    Boatswain...

  7. AN ESSAY BY HAROLD BLOOM
    (pp. 137-148)

    The Tempestled off the First Folio in 1623, seven years after the death of Shakespeare. Edward Dowden, an Anglo-Irish critic of the later nineteenth century, first referred to Shakespeare’s final group of plays as the Late Romances. Though I regard Dowden’s suggestion as unfortunate, it has become universal and no longer can be overturned. In the First Folio,The Tempestclearly is regarded by Shakespeare’s co-workers as a comedy, and I believe that we should think of it, and ofThe Winter’s Tale,as tragi-comedies.

    Shakespeare exorcised Christopher Marlowe through a long process that went on from about 1589...

  8. FURTHER READING
    (pp. 149-154)
  9. FINDING LIST
    (pp. 155-157)