Skip to Main Content
Have library access? Log in through your library
The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice

William Shakespeare
Fully annotated, with an Introduction, by Burton Raffel
With an essay by Harold Bloom
Copyright Date: 2006
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 208
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1np9mg
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    The Merchant of Venice
    Book Description:

    In this lively comedy of love and money in sixteenth-century Venice, Bassanio wants to impress the wealthy heiress Portia but lacks the necessary funds. He turns to his merchant friend, Antonio, who is forced to borrow from Shylock, a Jewish moneylender. When Antonio's business falters, repayment becomes impossible-and by the terms of the loan agreement, Shylock is able to demand a pound of Antonio's flesh. Portia cleverly intervenes, and all ends well (except of course for Shylock).

    eISBN: 978-0-300-13825-2
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

Export Selected Citations Export to NoodleTools Export to RefWorks Export to EasyBib Export a RIS file (For EndNote, ProCite, Reference Manager, Zotero, Mendeley...) Export a Text file (For BibTex)
  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ABOUT THIS BOOK
    (pp. ix-xvi)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xvii-xxxii)

    Written in the period 1596–1598,The Merchant of Venicewas first printed in 1600. This quarto-sized book, which has become the basic text for all modern editions, also gives us, directly and immediately via the volume’s title page, a good idea of what the printer-publisher thought was most worthy of public attention.“The most excellent history of the Merchant of Venice, with the extreme cruelty of Shylock the Jew towards the said merchant, in cutting a just pound of his flesh, and the obtaining of Portia by the choice of three chests.”¹ The Quarto text is so clean that scholars...

  5. SOME ESSENTIALS OF THE SHAKESPEAREAN STAGE
    (pp. xxxiii-xxxvi)
  6. The Merchant of Venice
    (pp. 1-150)

    AntonioIn sooth¹ I know not why I am so sad,

    It wearies me, you say it wearies you.

    But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,

    What stuff² ’tis made of, whereof it is borne,³

    I am to4learn.And such a want-wit5sadness makes of me,

    That I have much ado6to know myself.

    SalarinoYour mind is tossing on the ocean,7

    There where your argosies8with portly9sail

    Like signiors10and rich burghers11on the flood,12

    Or as it were13the pageants14of the sea,

    Do overpeer15the petty traffickers16

    That curtsy17to them,do them...

  7. AN ESSAY BY HAROLD BLOOM
    (pp. 151-158)

    Shylock is to the world of the comedies and romances what Hamlet is to the tragedies, and Falstaff to the histories: a representation so original as to be perpetually bewildering to us.What is beyond us in Hamlet and Falstaff is a mode of vast consciousness crossed by wit, so that we know authentic disinterestedness only by knowing the Hamlet of act 5,and know the wit that enlarges existence best by knowing Falstaff before his rejection by King Henry V, who has replaced Hal. Shylock is not beyond us in any way, and yet he resembles Hamlet and Falstaff in one...

  8. FURTHER READING
    (pp. 159-164)
  9. FINDING LIST
    (pp. 165-167)