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Lawrence Booth’s Book of Visions

Lawrence Booth’s Book of Visions

Maurice Manning
Foreword by W. S. Merwin
Copyright Date: 2001
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 96
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1npcc0
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  • Book Info
    Lawrence Booth’s Book of Visions
    Book Description:

    This year's winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets competition is Maurice Manning'sLawrence Booth's Book of Visions.These compelling poems take us on a wild ride through the life of a man child in the rural South. Presenting a cast of allegorical and symbolic, yet very real, characters, the poems have "authority, daring, [and] a language of color and sure movement," says series judge W.S. Merwin.

    FromSeven ChimerasThe way Booth makes a love story:same as a regular story, exceptunder one rock is a trapdoor that leadsto a room full of belly buttons;each must be pushed, one is a landmine.The way Booth makes hope:thirty-seven acres, Black Damon,Red Dog. Construct a pillar of firein the Great Field and let it becomeunquenchable.The way Booth ends the Jack-in-the-Box charade:shoot the weasel in the neckand toss it to the buzzards.The way Booth thinks of salvation:God holding a broken abacus,colored beads falling away.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-13818-4
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-ix)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. x-xv)
    W. S. Merwin

    The opening lines ofLawrence Booth’s Book of Visionsgive us an idea of what to expect from this vivid collection. Authority, daring, a language of color and sure movement, first of all, and a high style of great speed and resource that can range, without apparent change of step, from irony and farce to clear lyrical elegy, from refracted projections of child-talk to direct or costumed maturity.

    The individual poems, arranged in three sections, comprise one sequence, with a setting as present and consistent as the sets of a theatrical production, and they bring on a cast of characters...

  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xvi-xvi)
  5. ONE
    (pp. 3-38)
  6. TWO
    (pp. 41-58)
  7. THREE
    (pp. 61-80)