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The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell

The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell: Volume 1, 1672-1673

Martin Dzelzainis
Annabel Patterson
Copyright Date: 2003
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 544
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1npdzn
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  • Book Info
    The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell
    Book Description:

    Andrew Marvell (1621-78) is best known today as the author of a handful of exquisite lyrics and provocative political poems. In his own time, however, Marvell was famous for his brilliant prose interventions in the major issues of the Restoration, religious toleration, and what he called "arbitrary" as distinct from parliamentary government. This is the first modern edition of all Marvell's prose pamphlets, complete with introductions and annotation explaining the historical context. Four major scholars of the Restoration era have collaborated to produce this truly Anglo-American edition.From theRehearsal Transpros'd,a serio-comic best-seller which appeared with tacit permission from Charles II himself, through the documentaryAccount of the Growth of Popery and Arbitrary Government,Marvell established himself not only as a model of liberal thought for the eighteenth century but also as an irresistible new voice in political polemic, wittier, more literary, and hence more readable than his contemporaries.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-12997-7
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-x)
  3. Introduction
    (pp. xi-xliii)
    Annabel Patterson

    Andrew Marvell is known to most late-twentieth-century readers as the author of a handful of exquisite lyric poems, a smaller number of political poems provocative of much debate, and, to those few who persist in curiosity or commitment after these categories have been exhausted, some rather nasty-minded satires of the Restoration court and government. In his own time, however, Marvell was known for quite other reasons: as the author of several brilliant prose pamphlets on the subject of church government and religious toleration; and another pamphlet, less witty but more immediately influential, on the history and principles of parliamentary government...

  4. Chronology: Marvell in the Restoration
    (pp. xliv-lii)
  5. Abbreviations
    (pp. liii-lvi)
  6. REHEARSAL TRANSPROS’D

    • Introduction
      (pp. 3-40)

      InGregory, Father-Greybeard(1673), Edmund Hickeringill relates how

      at theRainbow-Coffee housethe other day, taking my place at due distance, not far from me, at another Table sat a wholeCabalof wits; made up of Virtuoso’s, Ingenioso’s, young Students of the Law, two Citizens, and to make the Jury full,vous avez,one old Gentleman . . . they all laughing heartily and gaping . . . I was tickled to know the cause of all this mirth, and presently found, it was aBookmade all this sport; the Title of it,The Rehearsal transpros’d.Look you...

    • THE REHEARSAL TRANSPROS’D;
      (pp. 41-204)

      THe Author of this Preface had first writ aDiscourse of Ecclesiastical Policy; after that,A Defence and Continuation of the Ecclesiastical Policy; and there he concludes his Epistle to the Reader in these words:But if this be the Penance I must undergo for the wantonness of my Pen, to answer the impertinent and slender Exceptions of every peevish and disingenuous Caviller; Reader, I am reformed from my incontinency of Scribling, and do here heartily bid thee an Eternal Farewel.¹Now this Expression lyes open to his ownDilemmaagainst the Nonconformists confessing in their prayers to God such...

  7. REHEARSAL TRANSPROS’D:: THE SECOND PART

    • Introduction
      (pp. 207-220)

      Few editors receive a gift such as Marvell left us in relation to the second part of theRehearsal Transpros’d:a dated personal letter describing the hostile responses to the first part and what he proposed to do about them. In a letter of May 3, 1673, to Sir Edward Harley, his ally in the cause of toleration and comprehension, Marvell wrote,

      I find here at my returne a new booke against the Rehearsall intitled: St, to him Bayes: writ by one Hodges. But it is like the rest onely something more triviall. Gregory Gray-beard is not yet out. Dr....

    • THE REHEARSALL TRANSPROS’D: The SECOND PART.
      (pp. 221-438)

      THeAuthor of the Ecclesiastical Polity(why not DoctorSermon?)¹ doubts, with some reason, whether he has not in that Studylost his understanding.² To convince himself therefore and others of the contrary, he attempts to shew here at the beginning, that he not only knows as yet what he does, but remembers still the very circumstances of his actions. He tells me:I had heard from him sooner had he not, immediately after he undertook my Correction, been preven-[I]ted by a dull and lazy distemper; but being now³ recruited,4&c. Sooner or later imports not, it comes much to...

  8. Appendix A: THE JUSTICE OF THE SWEDISH CAUSE AND THE DANGER OF THE PROTESTANT CAUSE INVOLVED THEREIN. “BY MONSR FREZENDORP.” BRITISH LIBRARY ADD. MS. 4459.
    (pp. 441-449)
  9. Appendix B: THE LIFE OF CALIGULA CAESAR FROM THE HISTORY OF THE TWELVE CAESARS, EMPERORS OF ROME (LONDON, 1672)
    (pp. 450-459)
  10. Appendix C: “THE KING’S SPEECH”
    (pp. 460-464)
  11. Index
    (pp. 465-479)