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Othello

Othello

William Shakespeare
Fully annotated, with an Introduction, by Burton Raffel
With an essay by Harold Bloom
Copyright Date: 2005
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 320
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1nph2f
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  • Book Info
    Othello
    Book Description:

    One of the most powerful dramas ever written for the stage,Othellois a story of revenge, illusion, passion, mistrust, jealousy, and murder. If in Iago Shakespeare created the most compelling villain in Western literature, in Othello and Desdemona he gave us our most tragic and unforgettable lovers.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-13829-0
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ABOUT THIS BOOK
    (pp. ix-xvi)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xvii-xxxvi)

    Over the past four hundred years, neither the text ofOthello,nor the “true” understanding of that text, has been fully settled. We lack manuscript copies of any of Shakespeare’s plays, and different printed sources frequently provide quite different readings. Given the nature of this annotated edition, however, and the fact thatOthello’s textual issues are more or less resolvable (especially in the light of Scott McMillin’s extremely helpful edition of the play’sFirst Quarto), I want to deal first with interpretation and more briefly, and only thereafter, with textual issues.

    The primary focus of interpretive disagreement has become the...

  5. SOME ESSENTIALS OF THE SHAKESPEAREAN STAGE
    (pp. xxxvii-xl)
  6. Othello
    (pp. 1-204)

    RoderigoNever¹ tell me, I take it much unkindly²

    That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse

    As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.³

    IagoBut you will not⁴ hear me. If ever I did dream⁵

    Of such a matter, abhor⁶ me.

    RoderigoThou told’st me Thou didst hold him⁷ in thy hate.⁸

    IagoDespise⁹ me

    If I do not.Three great ones10of the city,11

    In personal suit12to make me his lieutenant,

    Off-capped13to him, and by the faith14of man,

    I know my price,15I am worth no worse a place.16

    But he, as loving17...

  7. AN ESSAY BY HAROLD BLOOM
    (pp. 205-258)

    “The character of Iago . . . belongs to a class of characters common to Shakespeare, and at the same time peculiar to him—namely, that of great intellectual activity, accompanied with a total want of moral principle, and therefore displaying itself at the constant expense of others, and seeking to confound the practical distinctions of right and wrong, by referring them to some over-strained standard of speculative refinement.—Some persons, more nice than wise, have thought the whole of the character of Iago unnatural. Shakespeare, who was quite as good a philosopher as he was a poet, thought otherwise....

  8. FURTHER READING
    (pp. 259-264)
  9. FINDING LIST
    (pp. 265-268)