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The Forgotten Palestinians

The Forgotten Palestinians: A History of the Palestinians in Israel

Ilan Pappé
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 320
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1nphsk
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  • Book Info
    The Forgotten Palestinians
    Book Description:

    For more than 60 years, hundreds of thousands of Palestinians have lived as Israeli citizens within the borders of the nation formed at the end of the 1948 conflict. Occupying a precarious middle ground between the Jewish citizens of Israel and the dispossessed Palestinians of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, the Israeli Palestinians have developed an exceedingly complex relationship with the land they call home; however, in the innumerable discussions of the Israel-Palestine problem, their experiences are often overlooked and forgotten.

    In this book, historian Ilan Pappé examines how Israeli Palestinians have fared under Jewish rule and what their lives tell us about both Israel's attitude toward minorities and Palestinians' attitudes toward the Jewish state. Drawing upon significant archival and interview material, Pappé analyzes the Israeli state's policy towards its Palestinian citizens, finding discrimination in matters of housing, education, and civil rights. Rigorously researched yet highly readable,The Forgotten Palestiniansbrings a new and much-needed perspective to the Israel-Palestine debate.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-17013-9
    Subjects: Sociology, History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vii)
  3. [Map]
    (pp. viii-viii)
  4. PROLOGUE: HOSTILE ALIENS IN THEIR OWN HOMELAND
    (pp. 1-8)

    The early zionist settlers were compulsory diarists. They left the historians mountains of travelogues, journals and letters, writing from almost the moment they landed in Palestine, at the very beginning of the twentieth century. The land was unfamiliar and their journey from Eastern Europe was quite often harsh and dangerous. But they were well received, first in Jaffa where small boats took them ashore from their ships and where they looked for their first temporary abode or piece of land. The local Palestinians in most cases offered these newcomers some accommodation and advice on how to cultivate the land, something...

  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 9-14)

    This book is not the first attempt to narrate the story of a group that numbered a mere 100,000 people when the story began and is today no more than a million and a half. It is not a very sizeable group of people, but nonetheless one that deserves our attention. It has been and still is the subject of much social science research as a case study – or rather a test case – for a plethora of theories. The excellent work done so far, therefore, has focused on specific aspects of this group’s life, whether identified chronologically or...

  6. CHAPTER ONE OUT OF THE ASHES OF THE NAKBAH
    (pp. 15-45)

    The files about Palestinian villages compiled by the intelligence service of the Haganah, the Jewish underground during the British Mandate for Palestine, make a fascinating read. The intelligence officers prepared a file on every Palestinian village, all one thousand of them. The process of registering these villages began in 1940 and lasted for seven years. Every such file contained the most detailed information possible, from the names of the big families, through to the occupation of most of the villagers and their political affiliations, from their history to the quality of the land, the public buildings and even what grew...

  7. CHAPTER TWO THE OPEN WOUND: MILITARY RULE AND ITS LASTING IMPACT
    (pp. 46-93)

    The military rule imposed on the Palestinians in Israel deserves a book of its own, but almost like theNakbahitself, it is still repressed by the traumatized victims and the guilt-stricken victimizers. The rule was imposed on every area that had a large Palestinian population and was based on the British Mandate’s Emergency Regulations. It lasted until 1966 and it affected every walk and aspect of life.‘Hamimishar Ha-Zevai’in Hebrew means ‘military rule’. But it was not only a noun describing a legal reality, it was also the name of a unit within the Israeli army that supervised...

  8. CHAPTER THREE MILITARY RULE BY OTHER MEANS, 1967–1977
    (pp. 94-134)

    In the mid-1970S the Palestinians in Israel comprised 13 per cent of the overall population. As a result of the Israeli law that annexed East Jerusalem, which was occupied in the June 1967 war, they became 15 per cent, that is, about half a million people.

    The first twenty years of statehood were tough and anxious. At the time one suspects that many of them did not know that these were not objective hardships but the result of an intentional and systematic policy of discrimination. It was not only the visible aspect of military rule that oppressed the palestinians during...

  9. CHAPTER FOUR BETWEEN THE DAY OF THE LAND AND THE FIRST INTIFADA, 1976–1987
    (pp. 135-169)

    The dramatic events of the Day of the Land led to a briefrapprochement, and a halt to massive land confiscation – although only for a short while. The Galilee was not totally Judaized, but Palestinian–Jewish tension remained high. In November 1978, the Jewish heads of local councils in the Galilee met with governmental officials and ministers in the newly expanded (on Arab land) town of Carmiel. Carmiel now stretched over the land expropriated, despite the protest and the sacrifices made by the local community.

    The failure to stop the expropriation of land may be explained by the fact...

  10. CHAPTER FIVE AFTER THE FIRST INTIFADA: BETWEEN PALESTINIAN ASSERTIVENESS AND JEWISH UNCERTAINTY, 1987–1995
    (pp. 170-200)

    The images of yitzhak Rabin shaking the hand of Yasser Arafat on the White House lawn on 13 September 1993 have long been shelved, and rightly so, as an embarrassing moment of staged histrionics that utterly failed all those living between the River Jordan and the Mediterranean. Such cynicism and frustration are warranted in hindsight, given the dismal reality that developed on the ground. But at the time, the Palestinians in Israel, clinging desperately to any sign of better things to come, were moved deeply by the ceremony and could hear, or so they thought, the clatter of the wings...

  11. CHAPTER SIX THE HOPEFUL YEARS AND THEIR DEMISE, 1995–2000
    (pp. 201-228)

    1995 did not start well for the Palestinians in Israel. The year began with a huge demonstration in Nazareth against the settlement of Palestinian collaborators in Arab communities. The Oslo Accords meant that the new Palestinian Authority would now have jurisdiction over sizeable parts of the occupied territories. As a result, tens of thousands of Palestinians who had been working – either willingly, or, in most cases, reluctantly – with the Israeli secret service feared that they would now be identified and brutally punished by the new regime.

    The Israeli government’s decision was typically insensitive. Their policy of ethnically segregating...

  12. CHAPTER SEVEN THE 2000 EARTHQUAKE AND ITS IMPACT
    (pp. 229-263)

    It is not difficult to choose the image to represent the last decade of our story. All the possibilities come from three days in October 2000. It could be the picture of police snipers shooting at a gathering of youths and throwing stones and blazing bottles at them. It could also be Muhammad Asil, aged eighteen and a member of one of the very few Arab—Jewish youth peace movements, Seeds for Peace, who was shot at close range by a police officer when sitting under a tree as he watched the demonstration and clashes in his town of Sakhnin....

  13. EPILOGUE: THE OPPRESSIVE STATE
    (pp. 264-275)

    On 29 may 2007, the Israeli Knesset duly revalidated, as it has done annually in recent times, the Emergency Regulations that had been imposed in Palestine by the British Mandate in 1945 and readopted by Israel on its day of foundation in 1948.¹ On paper, even today in the twenty-first century, there are almost two hundred such regulations, which enable the state to legally declare any part of the country a closed military area, exercise administrative arrest without trial, expel and even execute citizens.

    From the creation of the state until 1996, there was no need to extend this validation...

  14. APPENDIX: NOTE ON THE SCHOLARSHIP
    (pp. 276-291)
  15. NOTES
    (pp. 292-308)
  16. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 309-316)
  17. INDEX
    (pp. 317-336)