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The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook

The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook

Albert W. A. Schmid
FOREWORD BY DEAN FEARING
Copyright Date: 2010
Pages: 168
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2tv636
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  • Book Info
    The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook
    Book Description:

    Once thought to be only the tipple of southern gentlemen and the companion of confederate roughnecks, bourbon has gained a steady resurgence in popularity over the years with an ever-expanding and diverse audience. A beverage distilled almost exclusively in Kentucky, bourbon has attained prominence and appreciation for its complexity, history, and tradition. In The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook, Albert Schmid provides readers with the best recipes using the famous spirit of the Bluegrass. From classic Kentucky cocktails such as the Mint Julep, to bourbon inspired desserts, such as Bourbon-Pecan Cr�me Brul�e with Chocolate Sauce, and more savory fare, such as Steaks with Bourbon Ginger Sauce, this book supplies recipes for every course. Schmid uses the four distinct seasons of the Bluegrass State to guide the reader through this rich collection of bourbon dishes and color photographs. In many ways a lesson on the flavor profiles that pair with and improve the flavor of bourbon, this book can be used by the home cook and the professional chef alike for inspiration to create new dishes. Much more than just a cookbook, The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook recounts bourbon lore, food traditions, and Kentucky history, giving the reader a full appreciation of America's native spirit.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-7374-0
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. FOREWORD
    (pp. ix-x)
    DEAN FEARING

    ALTHOUGH I HAVE MADE TEXAS my home since arriving in Dallas in 1979, I am proud to be from Kentucky. I was born in Ashland, in the far eastern part of the state, where my first food memories are of the simple but perfectly seasoned cooking of my grandmothers. I still use and treasure their recipes to this day, and much of my culinary inspiration can be traced to their early influence. Later, my father ran hotels in Louisville and elsewhere. He encouraged my interest in food and taught me valuable lessons in southern hospitality that have shaped my career...

  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xi-xii)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xiii-xvi)

    I LOVE FOOD AND I LOVE BOURBON. My first exposure to fine cuisine and bourbon occurred when I was a student at the McDonogh 15 elementary school. There, as I began learning the three Rs, I also began studying food and gastronomy. Although I didn’t know it at the time, it was one of the best places in the world for such study—the French Quarter in New Orleans. My father and mother moved to “the Big Easy” so my father could become pastor of the East-minster Presbyterian Church in New Orleans East. Every day my parents would drive me...

  6. CHAPTER ONE BEVERAGES Recipes for All Seasons
    (pp. 1-16)

    Bourbon is a kind of whiskey.Whisk(e)yis a word spelled two ways, with and without thee. The term is an English word of Celtic origin that comes from “uisce beatha” in Gaelic and “usice beatha” in Irish and is equivalent to “eau de vie” in French or “aqua vitae” in Latin. All of those terms mean “the water of life.”¹ How someone spellswhisk(e)yhas a lot to do with where the beverage is made, where the person’s family comes from, and what tradition he or she is trying to follow. For example, there is Scotch whisky and...

  7. CHAPTER TWO WINTER
    (pp. 17-39)

    For bourbon distilleries, winter is an important time of the year. As the weather cools, the temperature drops in the storage warehouses, allowing the bourbon to contract in the barrels. During the warm weather, the bourbon has expanded and pushed its way into the burned wood of the barrel. So now in cold weather, the bourbon contracts and pulls with it, from the barrel, color and flavor that will stay with the bourbon until it is consumed. For the bourbon drinker in winter, this whiskey provides relief from the cold by dropping the body’s temperature, a phenomenon perceived by humans...

  8. CHAPTER THREE SPRING
    (pp. 40-59)

    Spring in Kentucky signals not only the greening of the countryside but also the return of horse racing and the culmination of the basketball season. The greenery and horse racing are gastronomically joined in the traditional drink of the Kentucky Derby, the mint julep, which combines two local ingredients, mint and bourbon (seeMint Julep, page 12). For college basketball fans, spring brings March Madness, or the NCAA Basketball Tournament, during which drinks laced with bourbon, appetizers, and finger food are enjoyed while fans cheer for their favorite teams.

    Although shrimp would not have been served at the inaugural Kentucky...

  9. Photo gallery
    (pp. None)
  10. CHAPTER FOUR SUMMER
    (pp. 60-80)

    For distillers, summer is the season when whiskey warms in the warehouse, intermingling with the toasted oak of the never-used barrels and absorbing the flavors of vanilla, cloves, coconut, and caramel. The flavors gained in this process make bourbon unique in the whiskey-making world. Summer is also when corn, bourbon’s primary ingredient, is grown. A successful year for the crop translates into a bountiful harvest that will become plentiful bourbon; failure means elevated costs in production and a shortage of bourbon. Good corn also makes good bourbon. For the bourbon drinker, a highlight of summer is bourbon served over ice...

  11. CHAPTER FIVE FALL
    (pp. 81-104)

    In early fall, the corn—so important for bourbon production—is still being harvested. For gridiron fans, fall signals the return of football and of tailgating parties before the games. For bourbon drinkers, fall is a good time to travel the Bourbon Trail to see where their favorite beverage is produced. This is also the season for the Bourbon Festival, a tradition in Bardstown, Kentucky. The festival lasts for a week in late September and offers attendees the chance to enjoy bourbon tastings, music, and food; to see barrel-making, and to watch the World Championship Bourbon Barrel Relay.

    This recipe...

  12. APPENDIX DINNER FOR FOUR AT DICKIE BRENNAN’S BOURBON HOUSE IN NEW ORLEANS
    (pp. 105-116)
    DARIN NESBIT
  13. NOTES
    (pp. 117-120)
  14. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 121-124)
  15. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 125-128)
  16. BOURBON DISTILLERIES IN KENTUCKY
    (pp. 129-130)
  17. NAME AND SUBJECT INDEX
    (pp. 131-134)
  18. RECIPE INDEX
    (pp. 135-139)