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Wildflowers of Mississippi

Wildflowers of Mississippi

Stephen L. Timme
Copyright Date: 2007
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2tv75m
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  • Book Info
    Wildflowers of Mississippi
    Book Description:

    With its variety of habitats, Mississippi contains an especially rich and diverse set of native and naturalized flowering plants.

    First published in 1989, this handy volume is the comprehensive, full-color guide to the state's lush array of wildflowers. Now available again, it provides both professional and amateur botanists a quick yet authoritative resource for identifying more than five hundred of the wildflowers found in Mississippi and its contiguous states. An appendix provides scientific names that have changed since the original edition.

    Descriptions of species have been consistently organized for ready reference and comparison. Information on plants has been arranged alphabetically by family, genera, and species within the two groups of flowering plants. Each of the five hundred plus species is fully described and is identified by one or more full-color photographs.

    Stephen L. Timme is professor of botany and director of the Theodore M. Sperry Herbarium at Pittsburg State University in Kansas. He is coauthor ofMedicinal and Useful Plants of the Upper Amazon.

    eISBN: 978-1-60473-711-0
    Subjects: Botany & Plant Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-x)
  3. Preface
    (pp. xi-xii)
  4. Introduction
    (pp. xiii-2)

    The flora of Mississippi includes some 2,500 species of ferns and fern allies, sedges, rushes, grasses, woody plants, and forbs. This diversity of plant life can be found in a variety of habitats ranging from the floodplains in the western part of the state to the mountainous areas in the northeast and the dunes and savannas along the coast. A number of these species have been introduced from other areas or have escaped cultivation and become naturalized. Such species may become an established part of the flora for a particular area. Although the flora of some counties is well known,...

  5. Part I: Liliopsida (Monocots)

    • AGAVACEAE [= AMARYLLIDACEAE] Agave Family
      (pp. 5-5)
    • ALISMATACEAE Water-Plantain Family
      (pp. 6-6)
    • ARACEAE Arum Family
      (pp. 7-8)
    • COMMELINACEAE Spiderwort Family
      (pp. 9-9)
    • ERIOCAULACEAE Pipewort Family
      (pp. 10-10)
    • HAEMODORACEAE Redroot Family
      (pp. 11-11)
    • IRIDACEAE Iris Family
      (pp. 12-14)
    • LILIACEAE Lily Family
      (pp. 15-26)
    • MARANTACEAE Arrowroot Family
      (pp. 27-27)
    • ORCHIDACEAE Orchid Family
      (pp. 28-36)
    • PONTEDERIACEAE Pickerel-weed Family
      (pp. 37-37)
    • XYRIDACEAE Yellow-eyed Grass Family
      (pp. 38-38)
  6. Part II: Magnoliopsida (Dicots)

    • ACANTHACEAE Acanthus Family
      (pp. 41-42)
    • AMARANTHACEAE Amaranth Family
      (pp. 43-43)
    • ANACARDIACEAE Sumac or Cashew Family
      (pp. 44-44)
    • ANNONACEAE Pawpaw or Custard Apple Family
      (pp. 45-45)
    • APIACEAE [= UMBELLIFERAE] Carrot or Parsley Family
      (pp. 46-49)
    • APOCYNACEAE Dogbane Family
      (pp. 50-51)
    • ARALIACEAE Ginseng Family
      (pp. 52-52)
    • ARISTOLOCHIACEAE Birthwort Family
      (pp. 53-53)
    • ASCLEPIADACEAE Milkweed Family
      (pp. 54-56)
    • ASTERACEAE [= COMPOSITAE] Sunflower or Aster Family
      (pp. 57-95)
    • BALSAMINACEAE Balsam or Touch-me-not Family
      (pp. 96-96)
    • BATACAEAE Saltwort Family
      (pp. 97-97)
    • BERBERIDACEAE Barberry Family
      (pp. 98-98)
    • BIGNONIACEAE Trumpet Creeper Family
      (pp. 99-100)
    • BORAGINACEAE Borage or Forget-me-not Family
      (pp. 101-102)
    • BRASSICACEAE [= CRUCIFERAE] Mustard Family
      (pp. 103-104)
    • BUXACEAE Allegheny Spurge Family
      (pp. 105-105)
    • CABOMBACEAE [= NYMPHAEACEAE] Cabomba Family
      (pp. 106-106)
    • CACTACEAE Cactus Family
      (pp. 107-107)
    • CAESALPINIACEAE Caesalpinia Family
      (pp. 108-108)
    • CALYCANTHACEAE Sweet Shrub or Spicebush Family
      (pp. 109-109)
    • CAMPANULACEAE Bellflower Family
      (pp. 110-112)
    • CAPPARACEAE Caper Family
      (pp. 113-113)
    • CAPRIFOLIACEAE Honeysuckle Family
      (pp. 114-115)
    • CARYOPHYLLACEAE Pink Family
      (pp. 116-117)
    • CELASTRACEAE Staff-tree Family
      (pp. 118-118)
    • CHENOPODIACEAE Goosefoot Family
      (pp. 119-119)
    • CLETHRACEAE White Alder Family
      (pp. 120-120)
    • CLUSIACEAE [= HYPERICACEAE] St. Johnʹs Wort Family
      (pp. 121-123)
    • CONVOLVULACEAE Morning Glory Family
      (pp. 124-127)
    • CORNACEAE Dogwood Family
      (pp. 128-128)
    • CRASSULACEAE Stonecrop or Orpine Family
      (pp. 129-129)
    • CYRILLACEAE Titi or Cyrilla Family
      (pp. 130-130)
    • DROSERACEAE Sundew Family
      (pp. 131-131)
    • ERICACEAE Heath or Blueberry Family
      (pp. 132-134)
    • EUPHORBIACEAE Spurge Family
      (pp. 135-136)
    • FABACEAE Legume, Pea or Bean Family
      (pp. 137-149)
    • FUMARIACEAE Fumitory Family
      (pp. 150-150)
    • GENTIANACEAE Gentian Family
      (pp. 151-154)
    • GERANIACEAE Geraninum or Storkʹs-bill Family
      (pp. 155-155)
    • HYDRANGEACEAE Hydrangea Family
      (pp. 156-156)
    • HYDROPHYLLACEAE Waterleaf Family
      (pp. 157-157)
    • ILLICIACEAE Anise Family
      (pp. 158-158)
    • LAMIACEAE [= LABIATAE] Mint Family
      (pp. 159-167)
    • LENTIBULARIACEAE Butterwort or Bladderwort Family
      (pp. 168-169)
    • LINACEAE Flax Family
      (pp. 170-170)
    • LOGANIACEAE Jessamine Family
      (pp. 171-171)
    • LYTHRACEAE Loosestrife Family
      (pp. 172-173)
    • MAGNOLIACEAE Magnolia Family
      (pp. 174-175)
    • MALVACEAE Mallow Family
      (pp. 176-178)
    • MELASTOMATACEAE Melastoma or Meadow Beauty Family
      (pp. 179-180)
    • MENYANTHACEAE Bogbean Family
      (pp. 181-181)
    • MIMOSACEAE Mimosa or Acacia Family
      (pp. 182-183)
    • MONOTROPACEAE Indian Pipe Family
      (pp. 184-184)
    • NELUMBONACEAE Water Lotus Family
      (pp. 185-185)
    • NYMPHAEACEAE Water Lily Family
      (pp. 186-186)
    • OLEACEAE Olive Family
      (pp. 187-187)
    • ONAGRACEAE Evening Primrose Family
      (pp. 188-190)
    • OROBANCHACEAE Broom-rape Family
      (pp. 191-192)
    • OXALIDACEAE Wood Sorrel Family
      (pp. 193-193)
    • PAPAVERACEAE Poppy Family
      (pp. 194-194)
    • PASSIFLORACEAE Passion Flower Family
      (pp. 195-195)
    • PLUMBAGINACEAE Leadwort Family
      (pp. 196-196)
    • POLEMONIACEAE Phlox Family
      (pp. 197-198)
    • POLYGALACEAE Candy Root Family
      (pp. 199-201)
    • POLYGONACEAE Buckwheat or Smartweed Family
      (pp. 202-202)
    • PORTULACACEAE Purslane Family
      (pp. 203-203)
    • PRIMULACEAE Primrose Family
      (pp. 204-204)
    • RANUNCULACEAE Buttercup Family
      (pp. 205-209)
    • RHAMNACEAE Buckthorn Family
      (pp. 210-210)
    • ROSACEAE Rose Family
      (pp. 211-215)
    • RUBIACEAE Madder or Coffee Family
      (pp. 216-217)
    • SANTALACEAE Toadflax Family
      (pp. 218-218)
    • SAPINDACEAE Soapberry Family
      (pp. 219-219)
    • SARRACENIACEAE Pitcher Plant Family
      (pp. 220-221)
    • SAURURACEAE Lizardʹs Tail Family
      (pp. 222-222)
    • SAXIFRAGACEAE Saxifrag Family
      (pp. 223-224)
    • SCROPHULARIACEAE Figwort or Snapdragon Family
      (pp. 225-230)
    • SOLANACEAE Nightshade Family
      (pp. 231-232)
    • STAPHYLEACEAE Bladdernut Family
      (pp. 233-233)
    • STYRACACEAE Styrax Family
      (pp. 234-234)
    • SYMPLOCACEAE Sweetleaf Family
      (pp. 235-235)
    • THEACEAE Tea or Camellia Family
      (pp. 236-236)
    • VALERIANACEAE Valerian Family
      (pp. 237-237)
    • VERBENACEAE Vervain Family
      (pp. 238-239)
    • VIOLACEAE Violet Family
      (pp. 240-242)
  7. Glossary
    (pp. 243-252)
  8. Vegetative and Floral Characteristics: Illustrations
    (pp. 253-260)
  9. Selected References
    (pp. 261-264)
  10. Index
    (pp. 265-278)