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The Police-Mental Health Partnership

The Police-Mental Health Partnership: A Community-Based Response to Urban Violence

STEVEN MARANS
JEAN ADNOPOZ
MIRIAM BERKMAN
DEAN ESSERMAN
DOUGLAS MACDONALD
STEVEN NAGLER
RICHARD RANDALL
MARK SCHAEFER
MELVIN WEARING
Copyright Date: 1995
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 168
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt32bdx8
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  • Book Info
    The Police-Mental Health Partnership
    Book Description:

    Many of our children live in communities where violence, fear, and despair are commonplace. This book describes how one city developed a collaborative effort between law-enforcement and mental health professionals in order to help these children and their families.The Child Development-Community Policing Program in New Haven, Connecticut, was initiated in 1991 to deal more effectively with children who are victims or perpetrators of violence. Police officers, preparing for the new responsibilities of community-based policing, have become familiar with an array of strategies for preventing and responding to community violence. Mental health professionals have learned firsthand about the texture and trauma of the lives of children at risk. Police and mental health professionals working together have been able to mobilize treatment services more quickly and effectively and to assure that treatment plans are carried out. This manual provides a model, case studies, and guidelines for training the participants, operating a consultation service, and evaluating the program on an ongoing basis, all of which will be useful for other communities seeking to implement a similar project.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-14608-0
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. vii-x)
    DONALD J. COHEN and NICHOLAS PASTORE

    Several years ago, a group of faculty in the Yale Child Study Center became more immersed in thinking about the pathways into violence and the large number of children in clinical services whose lives were burdened by aggression. At the same time, police in New Haven embarked on a new, community-based approach that relied on the development of relationships between officers and the neighborhood residents for whom they work. In both fields, it became dear that we had to find other approaches to being useful, to augment traditional policing and clinical responses with more sustained and systemic interventions in the...

  4. The Authors
    (pp. xi-xii)
  5. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
  6. 1 Introduction
    (pp. 1-18)
    STEVEN MARANS, MIRIAM BERKMAN and DEAN ESSERMAN

    Today, when the threat and reality of violence overwhelm whole communities and undermine the sense of safety that is crucial to the optimal development and realization of the potential of our children, it is time to rethink the ways in which we intervene on their behalf. The Child Development–Community Policing (CD-CP) Program outlined in this manual aims to capitalize on the interests of two groups of professionals who have long been concerned about children caught in the cross fire of community violence but who, until recently, have worked in isolation. The collaboration between mental health and police professionals described...

  7. 2 Child Development Fellowships
    (pp. 19-39)
    MIRIAM BERKMAN, DOUGLAS MACDONALD, STEVEN MARANS, STEVEN NAGLER and MELVIN WEARING

    A child development fellowship provides selected supervisory police officers with an extended period of training and consultation with mental health professionals and an introduction to available programs for the evaluation and treatment of children and families. The basic clinical content of the fellowship includes material similar to the CD-CP seminar, however, the experiential and collaborative format of the fellowship facilitates the development of working relationships between officers and clinicians and provides police supervisors with additional tools for leading other officers. Simultaneously, the fellowship exposes a selected group of clinicians to the daily activities and concerns of police professionals.

    The fellowship...

  8. 3 Training Seminars
    (pp. 40-61)
    STEVEN NAGLER, STEVEN MARANS and MIRIAM BERKMAN

    The Child Development–Community Policing training seminars are intended to introduce police officers to the basic principles of child development and human behavior as useful tools of daily police work. The seminars capitalize on police officers’ well-developed observation skills, aiming to expand an officer’s field of observation to include child and adolescent behavior, as well as parent-child interactions. The practical nature of the seminar subject is emphasized through the use of field-based scenarios and the experiences of the seminar participants. Although the seminars proceed according to developmental sequence, each discussion attempts to link the inner life of the child and...

  9. 4 Consultation Service
    (pp. 62-83)
    MIRIAM BERKMAN, STEVEN MARANS and DOUGLAS MACDONALD

    Police officers, who are the first on the scene and most regularly in contact with children and families exposed to community violence, are in a unique position to intervene to ameliorate the psychological consequences of children’s chronic experience of violence. Officers’ stabilizing presence offers distressed children and their parents a sense of security and safety. The consultation service of the CD-CP program is intended to provide case-by-case assistance to officers in support of this role.

    The consultation service provides a wide range of coordinated clinical and police responses, including round-the-clock availability, crisis response, coordination of community response, clinical referral, interagency...

  10. 5 Program Conference
    (pp. 84-95)
    JEAN ADNOPOZ, RICHARD RANDALL and STEVEN MARANS

    The multiple activities of the Child Development–Community Policing Program suggest a need for a structured and consistent means of integrating the diverse program elements into a coherent whole. Keeping track of all the components—departmentwide training in the basic principles of child development, the fellowship program, clinical consultation around problematic cases, and crisis intervention, assessment, and treatment for children affected by violence and traumatic stress—requires ongoing discussion and coordination. Experience has made dear that the potential stresses and pressures inherent in this kind of work demand built-in opportunities for police officers and clinicians not only to discuss the...

  11. 6 Program Development
    (pp. 96-103)
    STEVEN NAGLER, STEVEN MARANS, MIRIAM BERKMAN and MARK SCHAEFER

    The Child Development–Community Policing Program is a collaborative effort between the police department and a child mental health agency of a particular community. As such, the relationships between the institutions and individuals within the institutions are the crucial factors in program development. Both the philosophy and the elements of the program have emphasized the importance of these relationships. This section offers a model for a program development process that is consistent with these principles. The collaborative process follows an interactive strategy that can guide a specific community’s program development effort. While each community’s program will evolve in a unique...

  12. 7 Results of the New Haven Program
    (pp. 104-124)
    STEVEN MARANS

    The Child Development–Community Policing Program has been in operation in New Haven since January 1992. During the first three years, the program has trained all four hundred and fifty members of the New Haven police force in the use of the consultation service; one hundred and sixty officers have completed the seminars on child development and human functioning; twenty-five police supervisors (sergeants and lieutenants) and the assistant chief of police have completed the fellowship and continue to meet with Child Study Center faculty in the weekly program conference. Six police supervisors have joined with the clinical faculty to staff...

  13. Appendix
    (pp. 125-138)
  14. References
    (pp. 139-142)
  15. Index
    (pp. 143-147)