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Mobilizing Inclusion

Mobilizing Inclusion: Transforming the Electorate through Get-Out-the-Vote Campaigns

Lisa García Bedolla
Melissa R. Michelson
Copyright Date: 2012
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 256
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt32bj9c
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  • Book Info
    Mobilizing Inclusion
    Book Description:

    Which get-out-the-vote efforts actually succeed in ethnoracial communities-and why? Analyzing the results from hundreds of original experiments, the authors of this book offer a persuasive new theory to explain why some methods work while others don't.

    Exploring and comparing a wide variety of efforts targeting ethnoracial voters, Lisa García Bedolla and Melissa R. Michelson present a new theoretical frame-the Social Cognition Model of voting, based on an individual's sense of civic identity-for understanding get-out-the-vote effectiveness. Their book will serve as a useful guide for political practitioners, for it offers concrete strategies to employ in developing future mobilization efforts.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-16739-9
    Subjects: Political Science, Sociology

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. I-VI)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. VII-VIII)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. IX-XII)
  4. A NOTE ON TERMINOLOGY
    (pp. XIII-XIV)
  5. List of Acronyms
    (pp. XV-XVI)
  6. 1 CONSTRUCTING VOTERS: THE SOCIOCULTURAL COGNITION MODEL AND VOTER MOBILIZATION
    (pp. 1-28)

    A man unlocked the heavy gate to let Rosa into the apartment complex; rusted metal squeaked as it swung open. Entering, Rosa found herself in a small, dusty courtyard framed on all sides by three levels of apartments. A few children were playing in the courtyard; they stopped to look at the stranger and to comment on her bright blue vest, identifying her as from the Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), a local community organization. Rosa glanced at the clipboard she carried to find the number of the first apartment she sought. She turned left up a flight of stairs...

  7. 2 VOTERS WILL THROW AWAY JESUS: INDIRECT METHODS AND GETTING OUT THE VOTE
    (pp. 29-54)

    The church leaders sat in a circle, brainstorming about how best to mobilize their congregation to vote. Since they had little money, they had decided to use leaflets for their outreach. Yet they knew that voters get hundreds of pieces of literature during each election. How could they make theirs stand out? “Aha!” they thought, “if we put a picture of Jesus Christ on the front (and the Virgin Mary on the back)—people won’t just throw away Jesus.” They hoped that the moment of hesitation might be enough for the targeted voter to read their leaflet and for it...

  8. 3 CALLING ALL VOTERS: PHONE BANKS AND GETTING OUT THE VOTE
    (pp. 55-85)

    The room is long and narrow, filled with rows of desks, each topped with a computer monitor and a phone. Empty pizza boxes and soda bottles litter the long tables at the far end of the room. Each phone and computer is manned by a volunteer. The screen displays show whom the volunteers are calling, what language they should use, and what script they should follow during their conversation. Since tonight’s phone canvassers speak four different Asian-origin languages, to the observer the room sounds like a modern-day Tower of Babel, where technology has combined with old-fashioned get-out-the-vote personal contact. The...

  9. 4 KNOCK, KNOCK, WHO’S THERE? DOOR-TO-DOOR CANVASSING AND GETTING OUT THE VOTE
    (pp. 86-127)

    The mercury had already hit eighty degrees Fahrenheit, even though it was not yet nine o’clock in the morning. Marianna and Gianna parked their car on the side of the road and felt the sun beat down on their heads as they made their way down the dusty driveway. Checking their clipboards to make certain they were going to the right house, they did not notice the flock of geese that had been disrupted by their arrival. The sound of flapping wings was the only warning they got before five angry birds were upon them, beaks open and honks blaring....

  10. 5 NOTES FROM THE FIELD: RUNNING AN EFFECTIVE MOBILIZATION CAMPAIGN
    (pp. 128-172)

    Lucas and Jackson, aged fourteen and seventeen, felt out of place in this neighborhood. Even though it was located only a few blocks from their school, it was over a mile from where they lived, and the area felt completely unfamiliar. The lawns were fenced and gated, with large, fierce-looking dogs patrolling the small patch of land in front of each house. Recruited by their local church, the boys had volunteered to help motivate individuals to vote. For every hour they worked, a club at their high school would receive a donation. Yet, when they found themselves in the field,...

  11. 6 EXPANDING THE ELECTORATE THROUGH PRACTICE: VOTING AND HABIT FORMATION
    (pp. 173-190)

    One of the most important questions regarding voter mobilization is whether its effects endure. Are those who are impelled to vote in a given election likely to vote in subsequent elections? Very often, enduring effects are ascribed to the formation of voting habits, the argument being that people who cast ballots in one election become accustomed to voting: being a voter becomes part of their cognitive schemas. Other explanations are also compatible with enduring mobilization effects. For example, when those classified as low-propensity voters cast ballots in a low-turnout election, they may be reclassified as middle-propensity voters and attract the...

  12. CONCLUSION: TRANSFORMING THE AMERICAN ELECTORATE
    (pp. 191-210)

    Carlota had never really talked to anyone about voting. She had just become an American citizen the year before and, as a part of the naturalization process, had registered to vote. The upcoming statewide election was the first contest in which she would be eligible to participate. At first, she was excited about the prospect of voting for the first time in her adult life. Then, when she received the sample ballot, she felt intimidated by the number and complexity of the choices she was being asked to make. She remembered learning about voting for her citizenship test—she knew...

  13. APPENDIX A: DETAILED TABLES
    (pp. 211-248)
  14. APPENDIX B: FORMS
    (pp. 249-254)
  15. NOTES
    (pp. 255-266)
  16. REFERENCES
    (pp. 267-280)
  17. INDEX
    (pp. 281-288)