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The New Eurocrats: National Civil Servants in EU Policymaking

Karin Geuijen
Paul’t Hart
Sebastiaan Princen
Kutsal Yesilkagit
Copyright Date: 2008
Pages: 176
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46mvpw
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  • Book Info
    The New Eurocrats
    Book Description:

    Policies in the EU are largely made by national civil servants who prepare and implement decisions in Brussels as well as at home. Despite their important role, these national civil servants form a relatively hidden world that has received little attention from both the media and academics. This volume considers a wide variety of sources and research methods to answer such questions as: how many civil servants are actually involved in EU-related activities? What do these civil servants do when they engage with the EU? And how do they negotiate their dual roles? The New Eurocrats offers unique and invaluable insights into these civil servants and their working practices-and uncovers some secrets in the world of EU governance along the way. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.

    eISBN: 978-90-485-0147-2
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-7)
  3. TABLES AND FIGURES
    (pp. 8-10)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 11-12)
    Karin Geuijen, Paul’t Hart, Sebastiaan Princen and Kutsal Yesilkagit
  5. CHAPTER 1 STUDYING EUROCRATS AT WORK
    (pp. 13-30)

    Civil servants from the various European Union (EU) member states are among the most ubiquitous and important players in European governance. Within the formal EU structures, they are involved in a myriad of Commission expert groups, Council working parties, and ‘comitology’ committees, as well as a range of advisory committees. In these various groups and committees, their roles vary from preparing decisions and giving advice to approving proposals on behalf of their political superiors and taking or implementing decisions. In addition, civil servants are active outside of these formal EU-related structures, either in independent networks of officials and regulators or...

  6. CHAPTER 2 TOWARD A EUROPEANISED CIVIL SERVICE? A SURVEY STUDY
    (pp. 31-50)
    Ellen Mastenbroek

    Before we touch upon this book’s main objective — to find out more about how Dutch national bureaucrats ‘do EU business’ — we first have to answer the obvious question: who are these people? How many officials in Dutch national government ‘do European business’ on a more than incidental basis? And which organisations within the Dutch public service do they tend to work for? Perhaps surprisingly, this obvious question has never been answered before. On the individual level, we do not know how many Dutch civil servants are involved in EU-related activities and what kinds of activities they are involved in. On...

  7. CHAPTER 3 EUROCRATIC WORK AS STRATEGIC BEHAVIOUR: MOVING BEFORE THE COMMISSION DOES IN VETERINARY POLICY
    (pp. 51-76)

    The senior echelons of the various departments that national Eurocrats work for expect them to make sure their department’s view of the world is successfully presented when EU policies are being created (or implemented). To do this job well, Eurocrats need to know about the plans and intentions of ‘their’ Directorate-General at the European Commission early on in the policy process. Furthermore, they need to be able to sense where the Commission is heading with a particular proposal; assess the implications for their department in terms of costs and benefits for the domestic policy status quo; discuss these plans with...

  8. CHAPTER 4 GETTING THINGS DONE IN EUROPEAN POLICE CO-OPERATION
    (pp. 77-102)

    In this chapter, as in the previous one, we will look at European governance through the eyes of people who routinely ‘do it’ as part of their jobs as national civil servants. We want to know how these national Eurocrats operate in international arenas and how this EU-related work is embedded in and facilitated by the organisations they are part of. In chapter 3, we focused on the veterinary policy case, in which the Commission was a crucial actor, driving a highly institutionalised regime of technocratic deliberation and negotiation, which is punctuated only occasionally by politically explosive issues such as...

  9. CHAPTER 5 BRIDGE BUILDERS OR BRIDGEHEADS IN BRUSSELS? THE WORLD OF SECONDED NATIONAL EXPERTS
    (pp. 103-128)
    Semin Suvarierol and Caspar van den Berg

    The foregoing chapters have demonstrated the extent to which national civil servants are involved in EU-related activities, and the dynamics of national administrative activities in the context of the EU. This chapter shifts the focus from national civil servants workingonthe European Union to national civil servants workingforthe European Union. This is a class of national civil servants for whom finding a balance between national and European interests in their work is a permanent, although sometimes implicit, feature of their daily professional activities. The duality of national and European roles is perhaps the most exacerbated for the...

  10. CHAPTER 6 UNDERSTANDING EUROCRATIC WORK: CONCLUSIONS AND REFLECTIONS
    (pp. 129-150)

    The research reported in this study was prompted by the widely perceived shift from ‘classic’ to ‘new’ diplomacy in the very design and day-to-day practices of international regimes such as the European Union. We set out to examine what implications the rise of policy-oriented, domain-specific bilateral, as well as multilateral, diplomacy (noted in chapter 1) has had on how nation-states organise their relations with their regional neighbours and the web of international organisations they belong to or are engaged in.

    By focusing on the case of the Netherlands and its modus operandi in the European Union, we wanted to document...

  11. APPENDIX ITEMS ON EUROPEANSATION INCLUDED IN THE ‘POMO’ SURVEY
    (pp. 151-152)
  12. NOTES
    (pp. 153-160)
  13. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 161-170)
  14. ABOUT THE AUTHORS
    (pp. 171-172)
  15. INDEX
    (pp. 173-176)