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Media Policy for the Digital Age

Media Policy for the Digital Age

Wetenschappelijke Raad voor het RegeringsbeleidSCIENTIFIC COUNCIL FOR GOVERNMENT POLICY
Series: WRR Rapporten
Copyright Date: 2005
Pages: 88
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46mw91
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  • Book Info
    Media Policy for the Digital Age
    Book Description:

    Traditionally, the Netherlands has enjoyed being a test market for many ideas in the media. But over the last decade, progress has been severely hampered by lengthy discussions on the future structure of just one sector of media, namely public broadcasting via radio and television. The narrow approach results in a lot of paper, speeches and theories, but little in the way of definitive policy making. In a report to the government, published in February 2005, the Scientific Council for Government Policy (WRR) argued for very different approaches to policy making. The recommendations are not only much broader than "broadcasting"; they tackle the challenges of making robust policy from new angles. Instead of trying to repair the old compass, the approach has been to find new instruments to help policymakers navigate the stormy and often confusing waters ahead. Perhaps the problem in the Netherlands is not accepting the new media, but rather accepting that the role "old" media has undergone a paradigm shift. Since the bulk of the WRR findings were published in the Dutch language, this summary is intended to provide readers outside the Netherlands with an insight into the issues at stake - and the solutions suggested by the WRR. Also available in Dutch"http://www.aup.nl/do.php?a=show_visitor_book&isbn=9789053567333">Focus op functies This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.

    eISBN: 978-90-485-0396-4
    Subjects: Political Science, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-8)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. 9-10)
    Wim B.H.J. van de Donk
  4. 1 INTRODUCTION AND ABSTRACT
    (pp. 11-16)

    The Netherlands is a small, densely populated nation. It is not a powerful country, but it does exert influence far greater than its size would suggest, through trade, aid and cultural exchange. It has a very productive and innovative ‘cultural industry’ that is increasingly active in offering both specific content and formats on international markets. It has a ‘unique’ media landscape. Yet, like other countries, the Netherlands is currently facing the challenges of digitalisation and the many changes this implies (McQuail and Siune 1998).

    Traditionally, the Netherlands has enjoyed being an international test market for many new ideas in the...

  5. 2 MEDIA AND SOCIETY: SOME GENERAL REFLECTIONS
    (pp. 17-22)

    The Dutch media landscape is rather unique in many respects, especially its complex ‘pillarised’ public broadcasting system. But it is certainly not unique when it comes to being affected by global change. The Dutch media landscape is evolving rapidly, heavily influenced by technological advances both in Europe in general and the Netherlands in particular. For some aspects, such as entertainment and gaming, the Dutch market is already far too small – developments here are already happening in the context of a global market.

    Traditional and emerging media imitate each other, getting intertwined in all sorts of new and surprising ways....

  6. 3 A CHANGING LANDSCAPE: SHORT OVERVIEW OF THE DOMINANT TRENDS
    (pp. 23-28)

    To obtain a well-informed picture of the future characteristics of the media landscape in the digital age, the Council commissioned a series of preparatory studies. These studies cover the different aspects and disciplines that are needed to draw up a new map of the media landscape: law (international and European), technology, economy, social and cultural aspects of media consumption and behaviour. As mentioned earlier, developments in these fields are most likely to show complex interactions. All of them still exhibit many uncertainties and ambiguities. However, a cross-impact analysis as well as many interviews and specialist meetings did enable us to...

  7. 4 A SHORT HISTORY OF THE DUTCH BROADCASTING POLICY
    (pp. 29-38)

    Many countries claim to have been involved in the early days of broadcasting. In the Netherlands, historical records show that an early Dutch radio pioneer, Hanso Schotanus à Steringa Idzerda, was perhaps the first in the world to broadcast programmes on a fixed schedule. Experiments elsewhere had been on a purely ad-hoc basis. On 5 November 1919, Idzerda put an advertisement in theNieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant(a Dutch newspaper that did not survive on its own and ultimately became part of a larger newspaper,nrc Handelsblad) that advertised a broadcast the following evening. At 8 pm on Thursday, 6 November,...

  8. 5 OTHER DOMAINS OF MEDIA POLICY
    (pp. 39-42)

    The members of parliament mentioned above questioned whether the current media law is out of touch with the changes in Dutch society and the broader media landscape. Although the law of 2000 is supposed to govern all printed and electronic forms of mass media, in fact there is different legislation for public broadcasting, commercial broadcasting and the press. As far as the Internet is concerned, the question of whether this should be seen as a medium or an infrastructure has not yet been asked, nor do policymakers have any answers. It is precisely the language of media and infrastructures that...

  9. 6 INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE NETHERLANDS: CHALLENGES AND POLICY QUESTIONS
    (pp. 43-50)

    Apart from the developments in media policymaking mentioned in the previous sections, many changes have taken place in the domain to be discussed here: infrastructures. Politicians and other policymakers who are responsible for the media domain have not always recognised this. Usually, they regard digitalisation of infrastructures as something that only applied to colleagues responsible for telecommunications policy. The developments in this domain, however, form one of the most important reasons for the fact that traditional goals and instruments of media policymaking are being seriously challenged. That is why we have expanded on this in a special section of this...

  10. 7 THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE: AN INSTITUTIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON CHANGE
    (pp. 51-62)

    The media landscape is increasingly governed by international regulation, and much of the policy is determined by the European Union. The Council of Europe, the European Court of Human Rights and the European Court of Justice protect the rights of the media to exercise their freedom of expression, whereby the freedom of the press is central. Apart from these approaches based on human rights, media policy is generally regulated by laws governing the internal European market and legislation governing competition and monopolies (Larouche and Van der Haar 2005).

    At the level of the European Union, there is in fact no...

  11. 8 A NEW PARADIGM: A FUNCTIONAL APPROACH TO THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE
    (pp. 63-82)

    The earlier sections of this book show the enormous pace of change: the media landscape is almost synonymous with technological innovations. Digitalisation is the driving force behind new equipment, new formats, new services and new relationships. Trying to create media policy to follow each of these new developments is not the approach that the Council considers very promising. It will not be effective, nor very efficient. It will be outdated before it can be seriously implemented. Moreover, there are still many uncertainties. The success of any new technology is not only linked to the technology itself, but to how people...

  12. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 83-84)
  13. Back Matter
    (pp. 85-85)