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iGovernment

iGovernment

Corien Prins
Dennis Broeders
Henk Griffioen
Anne-Greet Keizer
Esther Keymolen
Series: WRR Rapporten
Copyright Date: 2011
Pages: 264
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46mwkw
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  • Book Info
    iGovernment
    Book Description:

    How does the use of ict affect the relationship between government and its citizens? This book analyses the developments of networking information and concludes that in everyday practice an iGovernment has gradually come into existence, overtaking the old paradigm of the eGoverment. The iGoverment, effectively running at full speed on information flows and networks, is however seriously out of step with the self-image of the digital government, and the existing structure and division of responsibilities. This book is based on the report on iGovernment that the Scientific Council for Government Policy (WRR) presented to the Dutch Government in March 2011. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.

    eISBN: 978-90-485-1298-0
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-8)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. 9-10)
  4. SUMMARY
    (pp. 11-18)

    The ubiquitous use of ICT in government means that we can no longer label it ‘eGovernment’, where the focus is on providing services and on utilising technology. What has in fact evolved in everyday practice is closer to ‘iGovernment’, typified by information flows and data networks and focusing not only on providing services but also on control and care. iGovernment is bringing about far-reaching changes in the relationship between the public and the authorities. Although it has practical – and very real – implications for policy and implementation, iGovernment, with a few rare exceptions, has so far been flying under the political...

  5. PART I INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT

    • 1 DIGITIZING THE CITIZEN AND GOVERNMENT
      (pp. 21-46)

      Digitization is a fascinating phenomenon whose impact on society can hardly be overestimated. Many key societal and economic processes have come to rely heavily on ICT systems – systems that are essentially based on infinite series of zeros and ones. These simple digits are capable of converting analogue signals representing texts, images and sounds into digital versions of the same. One noteworthy feature of digitization is the relative ease with which users can gather, store, search, and share information, resulting in an unparalleled range of new products, services and applications. And it can all be done at breakneck speed: a mere...

    • 2 ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK: INFORMATION, ACTORS AND PRINCIPLES
      (pp. 47-80)

      Commentators have noted countless times that digitization is having an unprecedented impact on society. The dozens of reports published on ICT in recent years use adjectives such asrevolutionarydevelopments,uniqueopportunities,complextensions,fundamentalchanges,shiftinginterests andobsoletesocial and institutional contexts. But why, precisely, is digitization having such an unparalleled impact? Why should commentators refer to the related opportunities, tensions, shifts and challenges as ‘fundamental’, ‘unique’ or ‘complex’? And if all that is true, what are the consequences of digitization for the relationship between government and the citizen? If we set these qualifications to the side and...

  6. PART II EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS

    • 3 MANAGING eGOVERNMENT
      (pp. 83-102)

      The previous chapter explains that this study focuses more on technological systems in relation to their environment than on individual technologies or technology in general. Such sociotechnological systems consist of complex networks of people, technological applications, government and other organisations, and businesses. The motives and interests of the actors involved play an important role in charting the course that technological development takes and in generating and utilising information. The interactions that take place within this sociotechnological system are therefore the point of departure for the empirical analysis set out in this part of the book. That analysis zooms in on...

    • 4 FROM POLICY TO REALITY
      (pp. 103-132)

      It is not only politicians and policymakers in The Hague who have set ambitious targets for new systems and who are calling for more and better information. In addition to the national plans debated in the Senate and House of Representatives, a variety of local authorities and government agencies are working on their own plans and projects, relatively independently and far removed from parliamentary control. eGovernment is not only being rolled out ‘on the shop floor’; it is also being built there to a significant degree. There is ample scope for bottom-up initiatives. The national systems debated in Parliament are...

    • 5 EXCHANGE WITHOUT BORDERS
      (pp. 133-146)

      The setting up of information systems and the creation of connections between them have now become more or less thelingua francaof modern global governance. It is therefore obvious that information flows do not stop at national borders. As the WRR observed in 1998, information technology undercuts the significance of territorial boundaries. Today, governments are enthusiastically embracing that very feature. The global security drive after 9/11 has played a major role in this, but so has the extent to which the EU Member States have harmonised and coordinated their policies in a whole range of different areas. Information-sharing is...

    • 6 MARKET MASTERS AND MASTERING THE MARKET
      (pp. 147-162)

      Without an ICT supply market, there would be no eGovernment. On 9 September 2010, the then Minister of Health, Welfare and Sport, Ab Klink, reported to the House of Representatives on the sums spent on eGovernment, in this case on the EPD, in the ICT market.

      “In July, the Ministry received a request under the Government Information (Public Access) Act from RTL Nederland¹ asking for a full accounting of ‘all costs incurred and activities carried out under the auspices of the Ministry of Health in connection with the EPD for which invoices have been sent or which have been...

    • 7 SUPERVISORS OF eGOVERNMENT
      (pp. 163-178)

      We have already discussed many of the ‘supervisors’ of eGovernment in previous chapters. They are bodies charged with reviewing the ICT-related aspects of the relationship between government and the citizen, forcing changes where necessary, and/or urging such changes. This chapter looks more closely at the responsibility that these organisations bear in relation to government’s digitization projects and programmes. Our main focus, however, will be on how they perceive their role and how they actually fulfil it. Various actors have been assigned, and in fact play, a role as critical observers of eGovernment, making them vital to the necessary system of...

  7. PART III ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    • 8 iGOVERNMENT
      (pp. 181-196)

      Modern ICT offers government many tempting opportunities to speed up work processes, increase the effectiveness and efficiency of policy, offer better and more customised services, and lighten the load of bureaucratic paperwork. The aim is to make government streamlined, digital and service-minded while at the same time satisfying the citizen and ‘client’. In addition, ICT is increasingly being used in policymaking in the care sector and in the interest of public safety and international security. New systems and their interconnections are meant to make both the community and the world a safer place for the citizen. Indeed, innovative use of...

    • 9 RECOMMENDATIONS: WORKING ON iGOVERNMENT
      (pp. 197-222)

      Government must become aware that it has developed from an eGovernment into an iGovernment. That awareness is essential if it hopes to meet the challenges of unremitting digitization and to use digitization to exploit the benefits of innovation. A rationale based on iGovernment self-awareness will require government to look beyond technology and individual applications and shift its view to a broader perspective on information. That broader perspective means focusing on the information flows that result from the many different applications and the connections between them. In particular, it also means considering the consequences for society and policymaking of the ongoing...

  8. AFTERWORD: iGOVERNMENT AND iSOCIETY
    (pp. 223-228)

    In essence, this publication is about government taking responsibility for the way it uses ICT. The role that government plays in the information society and the responsibility that it bears go much further, however. In addition to being accountable for iGovernment, government is also responsible, to a certain extent, for the way the iSociety as a whole functions. Such sweeping responsibility can be defined in terms of the following questions: What aspects of the information society should government be concerned about? Should it intervene? If so, how? Former Dutch Prime Minister Wim Kok addressed this issue in April 2001 at...

  9. ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
    (pp. 229-230)
  10. REFERENCES
    (pp. 231-256)
  11. LIST OF INTERVIEWEES
    (pp. 257-263)